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Juiced: Wild Times, Rampant 'Roids, Smash Hits & How Baseball Got Big
AuthorJose Canseco
LanguageEnglish
PublisherRegan Books
Publication date
2005
ISBN0-06-074640-8

Juiced: Wild Times, Rampant 'Roids, Smash Hits & How Baseball Got Big is a 2005 book by Jose Canseco and his personal account of steroid usage in Major League Baseball. The book is autobiographical, and it focuses on Canseco's days as a major leaguer, his marriages, his daughter, and off-field incidents including his barroom brawl in 2001. The book deals primarily with anabolic steroids, drawing upon the personal experiences of Canseco. He takes personal credit for introducing steroids to baseball and names former teammates Mark McGwire, Juan González, Rafael Palmeiro, Iván Rodríguez, and Jason Giambi as fellow steroid users. He also believes he was blackballed by baseball when Bud Selig decided that the league needed to be cleaned up.

One of Juiced's central precepts is that steroid use is not in and of itself a bad thing, as long as the person is being monitored by a physician and the dosages are small. Canseco believes that steroids cannot only improve the game of baseball but also improve and lengthen lives and that more research needs to be done on the topic. Canseco claims to discredit many of the myths regarding steroids, asserting that they do not break down a person's body if used correctly and can actually help a person recover quickly from injuries. During the A&E Network's one-hour documentary, Jose Canseco: The Last Shot, Canseco said he "regrets mentioning players [as steroid users]. I never realized this was going to blow up and hurt so many people."[1]

Other topics in Juiced

See also

References