Juventus
Juventus
Full nameJuventus Football Club S.p.A.[1]
Nickname(s)[Le] Bianconere (The Black and Whites)
Juventus Femminile (Female Juventus)
Short nameJuve
Founded1 July 2017; 5 years ago (2017-07-01)
GroundJuventus Training Center
Capacity400
Owner
ChairmanAndrea Agnelli
Head coachJoe Montemurro
LeagueSerie A
2021–22Serie A, 1st of 12 (champions)
WebsiteClub website
Current season

Juventus Football Club (from Latin: iuventūs, 'youth'; Italian pronunciation: [juˈvɛntus]), colloquially known as Juventus Women or simply Juve (pronounced [ˈjuːve]), is a women's football club based in Turin, Piedmont, Italy. It was established in 2017 as the women's section of the homonymous club, following an acquisition of the sporting license of Cuneo.

The team compete in Serie A, the top flight in national football, since its debut in the 2017–18 season. They have won five league titles, two Coppa Italia titles, and three Supercoppa Italiana titles, becoming one of the country's most successful teams. In 2020–21 they became the first Italian club (women's or men's) to accomplish a perfect season, having won all their league matches. After their 2021–22 league triumph, Juventus became the first team to win five consecutive league titles.

History

Formation (2017)

Juventus' general manager Giuseppe Marotta announced in May 2017 that the club was planning to form a women's team.[2] The women's section of Juventus was officially formed on 1 July 2017.[3] Despite there being other women's football clubs in Turin in the past which had adopted the name "Juventus" and the black and white colours, such as Real Juventus and Juventus Torino [it], these have never had any connection with the men's club.[3]

Colloquially known as Juventus Women,[4] the team was formed thanks to the possibility given by the Italian Football Federation (FIGC) to professional men's clubs to purchase amateur women's clubs. Already active in women's youth football since 2015,[5] Juventus acquired the sporting licence of Serie A club Cuneo,[6] which in the meantime had dissolved,[4] allowing the newly-formed team to directly compete in the Italian top division;[7] several players were signed from neighbouring Brescia, Italian champions in two of the previous four seasons and runners-up in the others.[8]

Rita Guarino era (2017–2021)

Under the tenure of Rita Guarino,[9] Juventus quickly emerged as a dominating force in Italy, winning four consecutive league titles in their first four years of activity.[10] Juventus' first game was on 27 August 2017, in a 13–0 away victory over Torino in the first leg of the first round of 2017–18 Coppa Italia [it]; Martina Rosucci scored the club's first-ever goal.[11] In the 2017–18 Serie A, the club was tied with Brescia for first place at 60 points.[12] The two sides played a single-legged play-off match where, following a goalless draw after 120 minutes, Juventus beat Brescia 5–4 in a penalty shoot-out.[12]

In 2018–19, by virtue of having won the previous season's league title, they qualified for the UEFA Champions League; they lost 3–2 on aggregate to Brøndby in the round of 32.[13] That season [it], Juventus achieved the domestic double, winning their second Serie A title and first Coppa Italia.[14] In 2019–20, Juventus won both the Supercoppa Italiana, their first title,[15] and their third consecutive league title.[10] In only two years, the team won all the trophies of Italian women's football.[15]

In the 2020–21 season, Juventus won their second Supercoppa Italiana,[16] and their fourth-consecutive league title, becoming only the second club to achieve this streak after Torres in 2013.[17] They finished the season winning all 22 league matches, becoming the first team in the Italian women's top flight to accomplish a perfect season.[18]

Joe Montemurro era (2021–present)

After four seasons at the club, Guarino left Juventus,[19] and was replaced by Joe Montemurro ahead of the 2021–22 season.[20] Juventus won their fifth-consecutive league title, establishing a record streak in Italian women's football.[21] They also finished among the best eight teams in Europe, reaching the quarterfinals of the 2021–22 Champions League.[22] Having also won the Coppa Italia and Supercoppa Italiana that season, their second and third respectively, Juventus achieved their first domestic treble.[23]

Season by season

Season League Coppa Italia Supercoppa Italiana UEFA Champions League
Tier Division Position
2017–18 [it] 1 Serie A Champions Quarter-finals N/A N/A
2018–19 [it] Champions Champions Final Round of 32
2019–20 Champions Not concluded Champions Round of 32
2020–21 Champions Semi-finals Champions Round of 32
2021–22 Champions Champions Champions Quarter-finals

Players

For a list of former and current Juventus F.C. (women) players with a Wikipedia article, see Category:Juventus F.C. (women) players.

Current squad

As of 24 June 2022[24]

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Pos. Nation Player
1 GK Italy ITA Roberta Aprile (on loan from Inter)
3 DF Italy ITA Sara Gama (captain)
5 DF Sweden SWE Amanda Nildén
7 MF Italy ITA Valentina Cernoia
8 MF Italy ITA Martina Rosucci
9 FW Italy ITA Sofia Cantore
10 FW Italy ITA Cristiana Girelli
11 FW Italy ITA Barbara Bonansea
12 DF Denmark DEN Matilde Lundorf Skovsen
13 DF Italy ITA Lisa Boattin
14 MF Denmark DEN Sofie Junge Pedersen
No. Pos. Nation Player
15 MF Canada CAN Julia Grosso
16 GK France FRA Pauline Peyraud-Magnin
17 FW Sweden SWE Lina Hurtig
18 FW Netherlands NED Lineth Beerensteyn
19 MF France FRA Annahita Zamanian
21 MF Italy ITA Arianna Caruso
22 FW Italy ITA Agnese Bonfantini
23 DF Italy ITA Cecilia Salvai
32 DF Sweden SWE Linda Sembrant
71 DF Italy ITA Martina Lenzini
77 MF Iceland ISL Sara Björk Gunnarsdóttir

Youth players

As of 14 August 2021[25]

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Pos. Nation Player
6 DF Italy ITA Sara Caiazzo
18 MF Italy ITA Alice Giai
24 FW Italy ITA Nicole Arcangeli
27 FW Italy ITA Chiara Beccari
29 FW Italy ITA Elisa Pfattner
No. Pos. Nation Player
36 GK Italy ITA Valentina Soggiu
GK Italy ITA Beatrice Beretta
GK Italy ITA Giulia Mancuso
FW Italy ITA Federica Anghileri
FW Italy ITA Flavia Devoto

Other players under contract

As of 1 July 2022

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Pos. Nation Player
GK Italy ITA Beatrice Beretta
DF Italy ITA Beatrice Airoli
DF Italy ITA Lorenza Scarpelli
DF Italy ITA Vanessa Panzeri
DF Italy ITA Valentina Puglisi
DF Italy ITA Paola Boglioni
DF Italy ITA Michela Giordano
DF Italy ITA Martina Toniolo
DF Italy ITA Margherita Brscic
MF Italy ITA Vittoria Verna
MF Italy ITA Kristin Carrer
MF Italy ITA Melissa Bellucci
No. Pos. Nation Player
MF Italy ITA Carlotta Masu
MF Italy ITA Letizia Musolino
MF Italy ITA Ludovica Silvioni
FW Italy ITA Alice Berti
FW Italy ITA Asia Bragonzi
FW Argentina ARG Dalila Ippolito
FW Italy ITA Sofia Cantore
FW Italy ITA Flavia Devoto
FW Italy ITA Gaia Distefano
FW Italy ITA Adele Distefano
FW Italy ITA Federica Anghlieri

Managerial history

Below is a list of Juventus Women coaches from 2017 until the present day.

Name Nationality Years
Rita Guarino  Italy 2017–2021
Joe Montemurro  Australia 2021–current

Honours

European record

See also: UEFA Women's Champions League

As of match played 31 March 2022
Season Round Opposition Home[a] Away[a] Aggregate[a] Ref.
2018–19 Round of 32 Denmark Brøndby IF 2–2 0–1 2–3 [26]
2019–20 Round of 32 Spain Barcelona 0–2 1–2 1–4 [27]
2020–21 Round of 32 France Lyon 2–3 0–3 2–6 [28]
2021–22 First round North Macedonia Kamenica Sasa 12–0 (H)[b] [29]
Austria St. Pölten 4–1 (H)[c]
Second round Albania Vllaznia 1–0 2–0 3–0
Group A Switzerland Servette 4–0 3–0 2nd
England Chelsea 1–2 0–0
Germany VfL Wolfsburg 2–2 2–0
Quarter-finals France Lyon 2–1 1–3 3–4

Overall record

By country

Country Pld W D L GF GA GD Win%
 Albania 2 2 0 0 3 0 +3 100.00
 Austria 1 1 0 0 4 1 +3 100.00
 England 2 0 1 1 1 2 −1 000.00
 Denmark 2 0 1 1 2 3 −1 000.00
 France 4 1 0 3 5 10 −5 025.00
 Germany 2 1 1 0 4 2 +2 050.00
 North Macedonia 1 1 0 0 12 0 +12 100.00
 Spain 2 0 0 2 1 4 −3 000.00
  Switzerland 2 2 0 0 7 0 +7 100.00

By club

Team Country Pld W D L GF GA GD Win%
Barcelona Spain 2 0 0 2 1 4 −3 000.00
Brøndby IF Denmark 2 0 1 1 2 3 −1 000.00
Chelsea England 2 0 1 1 1 2 −1 000.00
Kamenica Sasa North Macedonia 1 1 0 0 12 0 +12 100.00
Lyon France 4 1 0 3 5 10 −5 025.00
Servette Switzerland 2 2 0 0 7 0 +7 100.00
St. Pölten Austria 1 1 0 0 4 1 +3 100.00
Vllaznia Albania 2 2 0 0 3 0 +3 100.00
VfL Wolfsburg Germany 2 1 1 0 4 2 +2 050.00

Notes

  1. ^ a b c Juventus score listed first
  2. ^ This match was the semi-final of the four-teams first round.
  3. ^ This match was the final of the four-teams first round.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Rilascio licenze UEFA 2022–2023" (PDF). FIGC. 9 May 2022. Retrieved 15 May 2022.
  2. ^ "Official: Juventus launch women's team". Football Italia. 16 June 2017. Retrieved 13 August 2017.
  3. ^ a b "Juventus Women to compete in Serie A". Juventus.com. 1 July 2017. Retrieved 24 August 2020.
  4. ^ a b "La conferenza stampa di presentazione della Juventus Women". Juventus.com (in Italian). 10 August 2017. Retrieved 24 August 2020.
  5. ^ "Descubrimos la Juve femenina" (in Spanish). Juventus F.C. 10 November 2016. Retrieved 13 August 2017.
  6. ^ "Comunicato ufficiale n°15". Lega Nazionale Dilettanti. 6 July 2017. Archived from the original on 4 August 2017. Retrieved 24 August 2020.
  7. ^ "Ammissioni Campionati Nazionali Femminili - S.S. 2017/18". Lega Nazionale Dilettanti. 1 August 2017. Archived from the original on 7 August 2017. Retrieved 24 August 2020.
  8. ^ Juventus Women are building their own legacy, Black & White & Read All Over, 7 December 2017
  9. ^ "Rita Guarino to coach Juventus Women". Juventus.com. 21 June 2017. Retrieved 24 August 2020.
  10. ^ a b "#LEAD3RS | Women campionesse d'Italia!". Juventus.com (in Italian). 25 June 2020. Retrieved 24 August 2020.
  11. ^ Juventus.com. "Che esordio per le Juventus Women! - Juventus". Juventus.com (in Italian). Retrieved 4 June 2021.
  12. ^ a b "#WOMENF1RST". Juventus.com. 21 May 2018. Retrieved 24 August 2020.
  13. ^ Maschio, Tommaso (26 September 2018). "CL femminile, Juve eliminata dal Brondby: decide Sorensen". TUTTOmercatoWEB.com (in Italian). Retrieved 17 December 2021.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  14. ^ "DOUBLE DELLE JUVENTUS WOMEN! LA COPPA ITALIA E' BIANCONERA!". Juventus.com (in Italian). 28 April 2019. Retrieved 24 August 2020.
  15. ^ a b "SUPER Juventus Women!". Juventus.com (in Italian). 27 October 2019. Retrieved 24 August 2020.
  16. ^ "La Juve trionfa in Supercoppa, Fiorentina ko 2–0". sport.sky.it (in Italian). 10 January 2021. Retrieved 10 January 2021.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  17. ^ "Serie A femminile. La Juventus batte il Napoli e si laurea Campione d'Italia per la quarta stagione di fila". www.tuttocampo.it (in Italian). Retrieved 8 May 2021.
  18. ^ "Record per la Juventus femminile: 22 vittorie su 22 partite in campionato". Globalist (in Italian). Retrieved 23 May 2021.
  19. ^ "Juve Femminile, UFFICIALE l'addio di coach Rita Guarino". Calciomercato.com | Tutte le news sul calcio in tempo reale (in Italian). Retrieved 8 June 2021.
  20. ^ Juventus.com. "Joe Montemurro è il nuovo Coach delle Juventus Women! - Juventus". Juventus.com (in Italian). Retrieved 8 June 2021.
  21. ^ Juventus.com. "Che numeri, Campionesse! - Juventus". Juventus.com (in Italian). Retrieved 23 May 2022.
  22. ^ "Poker della Juventus Women al Servette: bianconere ai quarti di Champions da seconde | Goal.com". www.goal.com. Retrieved 23 May 2022.
  23. ^ "La Juventus Women vince anche la Coppa Italia: 2-1 alla Roma | Goal.com". www.goal.com. Retrieved 23 May 2022.
  24. ^ Juventus.com. "Women". Juventus.com. Retrieved 25 June 2020.
  25. ^ "Italy - Juventus FC - Results, fixtures, squad, statistics, photos, videos and news - Women Soccerway". int.women.soccerway.com. Retrieved 7 January 2021.
  26. ^ UEFA.com. "Brøndby-Juventus | UEFA Women's Champions League". UEFA.com. Retrieved 8 July 2021.
  27. ^ UEFA.com. "Barcelona-Juventus | UEFA Women's Champions League". UEFA.com. Retrieved 8 July 2021.
  28. ^ UEFA.com. "Lyon-Juventus | UEFA Women's Champions League". UEFA.com. Retrieved 8 July 2021.
  29. ^ UEFA.com. "UEFA Women's Champions League". UEFA.com. Retrieved 7 October 2021.