KFIV
KFIV Power Talk 1360 logo.png
Frequency1360 kHz
BrandingPower Talk 1360
Programming
FormatTalk radio
Affiliations
Ownership
Owner
KJSN, KMRQ, KOSO, KWSX
History
First air date
March 20, 1950; 72 years ago (1950-03-20) (as KMOD)
Former call signs
  • KMOD (1950–1957)
  • KFIV (1957–1989)
  • KASH (1989–1991)
Call sign meaning
FIVe (backronym for former "K-5" branding)
Technical information
Facility ID12959
ClassB
Power4,000 watts day
950 watts night
Transmitter coordinates
37°41′23″N 120°57′12″W / 37.68972°N 120.95333°W / 37.68972; -120.95333
Links
WebcastListen Live
WebsitePowerTalk1360.iheart.com

KFIV (1360 AM) is a broadcast radio station in the United States. Licensed to Modesto, California, it has a talk format and is owned by iHeartMedia, Inc.

Founded in 1950 as KMOD, the station became KFIV in 1957 and had a hit music format branded "K-5" for much of its first four decades. From 1989 to 1991, the station had call sign KASH and a business news format. KFIV returned to its present call sign in 1991 and began broadcasting a news/talk format around 1994. Clear Channel Communications, predecessor to iHeartMedia, bought KFIV in 2000.

History

As KMOD (1950–1957)

The station signed on the air March 20, 1950 as KMOD, a 1,000-watt station owned by Radio Modesto, Inc.[1][2] KMOD was a network affiliate of ABC Radio and broadcast popular ABC programs such as The Lone Ranger and commentaries by Paul Harvey and Walter Winchell.[3][2] KMOD's studios were once located in the Hotel Covell prior to moving to Orangeburg Avenue and Oakland Road in 1953.[2][1]

Among early programming on KMOD were early morning shows in foreign languages including Portuguese, Italian, and Spanish; popular and country music; and a Saturday afternoon program featuring the music of Glenn Miller.[4][2] The Billboard observed in 1954 that KMOD DJ Gene Williams played "good danceable instrumentals" on his program.[5]

First time as KFIV (1957–1989)

In 1957, Radio Modesto sold KMOD to the Finley Broadcasting Company for $170,000.[6] KMOD became KFIV on May 5, 1957 and was sold by Finley to K-Fiv, Inc. in 1959 for nearly $103,000.[1][7] Branded "K-5", KFIV was a Top 40 station into the 1980s.[8][9][10]

KFIV increased its power from 1,000 to 5,000 watts in 1965.[1] Kilibro Broadcasting bought KFIV for $475,000 in 1966.[11] Kilibro founded a KFIV-FM sister station in 1977.[12] In 1982, the KFIV stations were part of a four-station, $5.7 million sale from Kilibro and Monterey Peninsula Communications to Community Pacific Broadcasting.[13]

As KASH (1989–1991)

The call sign changed to KASH on March 17, 1989.[14] KASH changed from music to business news and talk and joined the Mutual Broadcasting System.[15][16]

Second time as KFIV (1991–present)

Logo of Power Talk 1360 KFIV prior to 2002.
Logo of Power Talk 1360 KFIV prior to 2002.

The station became KFIV again on February 22, 1991 and retained its previous business format.[14][17] By 1994, KFIV became a standard news/talk station.[18] Community Pacific Broadcasting purchased Stockton station KJAX (later KWSX) in 1996 and made KJAX a full-time simulcast of KFIV.[19]

Logo of 1360 AM News/Talk KFIV from 2002 to 2006.
Logo of 1360 AM News/Talk KFIV from 2002 to 2006.

After 50 years of local ownership, KFIV was acquired by Clear Channel Communications, the forerunner to today's iHeartMedia, Inc., in 2000.[20] KFIV was branded "Power Talk 1360 KFIV" around 2001.[21] By 2003, KFIV had a local morning show along with syndicated talk shows including The Rush Limbaugh Show, Dr. Laura, and The Savage Nation.[22]

Logo of the "K5/K6" simulcast with KWSX in Stockton in late 2006.
Logo of the "K5/K6" simulcast with KWSX in Stockton in late 2006.

In 2006, KFIV and KWSX began a new simulcast branded "K-5 and K-6" after KWSX changed from a religious to news/talk format and introduced a new morning show hosted by Bill Mick.[23][24] Dave Bowman (formerly Dave Diamond) replaced Mick as morning host for KFIV/KWSX in 2007 and moved to afternoons before resigning in 2015.[25][26][27]

Logo of the "K5" simulcast with KWSX from 2006 to 2008.
Logo of the "K5" simulcast with KWSX from 2006 to 2008.

The KFIV/KWSX simulcast was rebranded "Power Talk" in September 2013.[28] Trevor Carey replaced Bowman as afternoon drive host in February 2015.[29] Dan Conry became afternoon drive host in July 2016.[30]

In June 2018, KWSX dropped the KFIV simulcast and became a Fox Sports Radio affiliate.[31]

Programming

Most weekday programming is nationally syndicated conservative talk shows. They include The Glenn Beck Program, The Rush Limbaugh Show, and The Sean Hannity Show from Premiere Networks, The Mark Levin Show from Westwood One, and The Chad Benson Show from Radio America.[32] KFIV broadcasts hourly news bulletins from Fox News Radio.[33]

KFIV also broadcasts some sports coverage, such as NFL on Westwood One Sports.[34] KFIV also broadcast San Jose State University football in 2005,[35] 2008,[36] and from 2012 to 2019.[37][38]

References

  1. ^ a b c d "Broadcasting Station License Record [KFIV, KMOD]". Federal Communications Commission. Retrieved January 3, 2021.
  2. ^ a b c d "KMOD/KFIV". Modesto Radio Museum. Retrieved January 3, 2021.
  3. ^ Broadcasting Yearbook 1951 (PDF). Washington: Broadcasting Publications. 1951. p. 90. Retrieved January 3, 2021 – via World Radio History.
  4. ^ Martin, Joe (June 7, 1952). "Vox Jox". The Billboard. 64 (23): 24. Retrieved January 3, 2021 – via World Radio History.
  5. ^ "Vox Jox". The Billboard. 66 (18): 30. May 1, 1954. Retrieved January 3, 2021 – via World Radio History.
  6. ^ "Two video, two radio stations sold for $4.5 million total" (PDF). 64 (23). March 4, 1957: 74. Retrieved January 3, 2021 – via World Radio History. ((cite journal)): Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  7. ^ "Ownership Changes" (PDF). Broadcasting. 56 (18): 98. May 4, 1959. Retrieved January 3, 2021.
  8. ^ "Introduction of Bob at the MAMA Awards – Modesto Radio Museum".
  9. ^ "Quite a Ride, When You Ride Shotgun – Modesto Radio Museum".
  10. ^ Broadcasting/Cable Yearbook 1989 (PDF). Washington: Broadcasting Publications. 1989. p. B-35. Retrieved January 7, 2021 – via World Radio History.
  11. ^ "Existing AM stations" (PDF). Broadcasting. 71 (19): 109. November 7, 1966. Retrieved January 3, 2021 – via World Radio History.
  12. ^ Broadcasting Yearbook 1978 (PDF). Washington: Broadcasting Publications. 1978. p. C-23. Retrieved January 3, 2021 – via World Radio History.
  13. ^ "Approved" (PDF). Broadcasting. 103 (16): 57. October 18, 1982. Retrieved January 3, 2021 – via World Radio History.
  14. ^ a b "FCCdata.org - powered by REC". fccdata.org.
  15. ^ The Broadcasting Yearbook 1990 (PDF). Washington: Broadcasting Publications. 1990. p. B-38. Retrieved January 3, 2021 – via World Radio History.
  16. ^ The Broadcasting Yearbook 1991 (PDF). Washington: Broadcasting Publications. 1991. p. B-38. Retrieved January 3, 2021 – via World Radio History.
  17. ^ The Broadcasting Yearbook 1992 (PDF). Washington: Broadcasting Publications. 1992. p. A-40. Retrieved January 3, 2021 – via World Radio History.
  18. ^ The Broadcasting Yearbook 1994 (PDF). Washington: Broadcasting Publications. 1994. p. B-42. Retrieved January 3, 2021 – via World Radio History.
  19. ^ "Data" (PDF). worldradiohistory.com. Retrieved 2021-04-03.
  20. ^ Broadcasting & Cable Yearbook 2010 page D-95
  21. ^ "Listing". www.kfiv1360.com:80.com. Archived from the original on 2001-04-28. Retrieved 2021-04-18.
  22. ^ "Listing". www.kfiv1360.com:80.com. Archived from the original on 2003-02-12. Retrieved 2021-04-18.
  23. ^ Cuslidge, Tara (January 2, 2006). "Christian station going off the air". The Record. Stockton. Retrieved December 29, 2020.
  24. ^ "Bill Mick Joins K-5 And K-6/Modesto-Stockton". All Access. January 3, 2006. Retrieved December 29, 2020.
  25. ^ "Dave Bowman Exits KFIV-KWSX". All Access. January 12, 2015. Retrieved December 30, 2020.
  26. ^ "Sly: Hopefully, tea parties mean more involvement". The Modesto Bee. April 11, 2009. Retrieved January 2, 2021.
  27. ^ "K5 Live & Local". www.kfiv1360.com. Archived from the original on 1 February 2008. Retrieved 12 January 2022.
  28. ^ Venta, Lance (September 23, 2013). "Clear Channel Launches PowerTalk Simulcast In Stockton & Modesto". Radio Insight. Archived from the original on September 25, 2013. Retrieved December 27, 2020.
  29. ^ "Trevor Carey Joins Power Talk/Modesto-Stockton For Afternoons". All Access. February 4, 2015. Retrieved December 30, 2020.
  30. ^ "KFIV-KWSX (Power Talk 1360/1280)/Modesto-Stockton Adds Dan Conry For Afternoons". All Access. July 12, 2016. Retrieved December 30, 2020.
  31. ^ "Facebook". www.facebook.com.
  32. ^ "Find PowerTalk 1360 KFIV's Friday Live On-Air Schedule". PowerTalk 1360 KFIV.
  33. ^ "Station Finder". Fox News Radio. Retrieved January 3, 2021. Select "California" as state and "5 Minute News" as show.
  34. ^ "Station Finder".
  35. ^ "KNTS (1220 AM) to provide full-season radio coverage of football and men's basketball". San Jose State Athletics. August 3, 2005. Archived from the original on August 25, 2016. Retrieved January 3, 2021.
  36. ^ "Radio Network Expands; Adds Affiliate, Analyst". San Jose State University. August 8, 2008. Retrieved January 3, 2021.
  37. ^ "KFIV (1360 AM, Modesto) Joins Radio Network". San Jose State University. August 31, 2012. Archived from the original on September 24, 2015. Retrieved January 3, 2021.
  38. ^ Fan, Lawrence (November 25, 2019). "Spartans Host Fresno State For Valley Trophy". San Jose State University. Retrieved January 3, 2021.