KMXR
KMXR BIG93.9 logo.png
Broadcast areaCorpus Christi, Texas
Frequency93.9 MHz
BrandingBig 93.9
Programming
FormatClassic hits
Ownership
Owner
History
First air date
1970 (1970)
Former call signs
KSIX-FM (1970–1980)
KEXX (1980–1985)
KSTE (1985–1989)
Technical information
Facility ID55163
ClassC1
ERP100,000 watts
HAAT284 meters (932 ft)
Transmitter coordinates
27°45′7.00″N 97°38′17.00″W / 27.7519444°N 97.6380556°W / 27.7519444; -97.6380556Coordinates: 27°45′7.00″N 97°38′17.00″W / 27.7519444°N 97.6380556°W / 27.7519444; -97.6380556
Links
WebcastListen Live
Websitebig939.iheart.com

KMXR (93.9 FM, "Big 93.9") is a radio station broadcasting a classic hits format.[1] Licensed to Corpus Christi, Texas, United States, the station serves the Corpus Christi area. The station is currently owned by iHeartMedia.[2] The station's studios and offices are located on Old Brownsville Road in Corpus Christi near the airport, and its transmitter tower is located in Robstown, Texas.

History

The station was originally licensed and constructed by the legendary Col. Vann M. Kennedy, a pioneer Texas broadcaster. Col. Kennedy was perhaps best known for giving Walter Cronkite his first job in news while Cronkite attended UT Austin, and, as Cronkite later described it, "teaching me to write." Mr. Kennedy also built KZTV, Channel 10, Corpus Christi, and KVTV, Channel 13, Laredo, along with KSIX, a pioneer South Texas AM. The 93.9FM frequency was originally licensed as KSIX-FM, with the call letters changed to KEXX which offered adult contemporary format in the early 1980s. The station was assigned the call letters KSTE on December 2, 1985 on its sale to American Wireless Company. KSTE offered an adult contemporary format.

On April 1, 1989, the station changed its call sign to the current KMXR.[3]

On December 26, 2014 KMXR rebranded as "Big 93.9".

References

  1. ^ "Station Information Profile". Arbitron. Summer 2009. Retrieved 2009-08-23.
  2. ^ "KMXR Facility Record". United States Federal Communications Commission, audio division. Retrieved 2009-08-23.
  3. ^ "KMXR Call Sign History". United States Federal Communications Commission, audio division. Retrieved 2009-08-23.