KQNK
Simulcasting KQNK-FM Norton
KQNK station logo.png
Frequency1530 kHz
BrandingClassic Hits KQNK
Programming
FormatClassic hits
AffiliationsWestwood One
Ownership
KQNK-FM
History
First air date
October 30, 1963 (as KNBI)
Former call signs
KNBI (1963-1978)
Technical information
Facility ID52681
ClassD
Power1,000 watts daytime only
Transmitter coordinates
39°49′37″N 99°52′08″W / 39.82694°N 99.86889°W / 39.82694; -99.86889Coordinates: 39°49′37″N 99°52′08″W / 39.82694°N 99.86889°W / 39.82694; -99.86889
Translator(s)102.5 K273DE (Norton)
Links
WebcastListen Live
Websitekqnk.com

KQNK (1530 AM) is a radio station licensed to Norton, Kansas, United States. The station airs a Classic hits format, and is currently owned by Dierking Communications, Inc.[1]

History

KQNK was originally licensed on 6 April 1964 as KNBI. The original license was issued to Norton broadcasting, Inc. (per the FCC History cards).

In 1965, the news department of KNBI reported that UFOs had been spotted in the Norton area.[2]

As of 1969, the station was affiliated with the Mutual Broadcasting System.[3]

In 1971, the license was transferred to Kansas-Nebraska Broadcasters, Inc.

In 1973, Tim Adrian, AG director of KNBI asked to be considered as the replacement for Earl Butz as agriculture secretary, who had recently resigned. Rep. Keith Sebelius said he would pass the name onto then President Gerald R. Ford.[4]

In 1974, the license was transferred to Prairie Dog Broadcasting Company.

In 1975, the station tower was hit by lightning, and knocked off the air for more than a day, according to Dave Tucker, the owner of the station.[5]

In 1978, the license returned to Norton Broadcasting Inc. and the call sign was changed to the current KQNK.

By 1980, the license was controlled by Pioneer Country Broadcasting, Inc. who operated the radio station for about 20 years.

In 1999, the license was transferred to Bruce Dierking, the current licensee.

Awards

In 1973, KNBI was awarded an honor certificate from the Freedoms Foundation for producing a 15-minute broadcast talking to people about why they are proud of Norton.[6]

References

  1. ^ "KQNK Facility Record". United States Federal Communications Commission, audio division. Accessed December 2, 2013
  2. ^ "Report Flying Objects in Norton Area". Council Grove Republican. Associated Press. 22 Nov 1965.
  3. ^ "VFW auxiliary hold Viet gift Radio Marathon". Great Bend (KS) Tribune. 22 Aug 1969.
  4. ^ "Norton Man seeks Butz' old position". Salina Journal. UPI. 7 Oct 1976. p. 2.
  5. ^ "Lightning Silences Norton Radio Station". the Hays (KS) Daily News. 1 June 1975.
  6. ^ "Salina man among winners". Salina(KS) Journal. 18 Feb 1973. p. 8.