Karate World Championships
Competition details
DisciplineKarate
TypeKumite and Kata, biennial
OrganiserWorld Karate Federation (WKF)
Divisions
Current weight divisionsMale -60Kg,-67Kg, -75Kg, -84Kg and +84Kg. Female -50Kg, -55Kg, -61Kg, -68Kg and +68Kg.
History
First edition1970 in Tokyo, Japan
Editions24 (2018)
Final edition2018 in Madrid, Spain
Most wins Japan (188 medals)

The Karate World Championships, also known as the World Karate Championships, are the highest level of competition for karate organized by the World Karate Federation (WKF).[1][2][3][4][5] The competition is held in a different city every two years.[6] Championships in the 2000s included Madrid in 2002, Monterrey in 2004, Tampere in 2006, Tokyo in 2008, and Belgrade in 2010.[7][8] The competition was initially riddled with controversy regarding karate styles and the ruleset.[2][9][10][11][12]

In 1980, women were first allowed to compete in the championships.[9]

Competition and events

Kumite

Kumite Rules

The result of a bout is determined by a contestant obtaining a clear lead of eight points, having the highest number of points at time-up, obtaining a decision (hantei ), or by an accumulation of prohibited behaviors imposed against a contestant.

Scoring & Penalties

This article may contain indiscriminate, excessive, or irrelevant examples. Please improve the article by adding more descriptive text and removing less pertinent examples. See Wikipedia's guide to writing better articles for further suggestions. (January 2016)

Kata

Rules

1. Conformity - with standards in form and style (Ryu-ha)

2. Technical performance:

3. Athletic performance:

4. Fouls:

List of Karate World Championships

Edition Year Host City Country Events
1 1970 Tokyo  Japan 2
2 1972 Paris  France 2
3 1975 Long Beach  United States 2
4 1977 Tokyo  Japan 2
5 1980 Madrid  Spain 10
6 1982 Taipei  Taiwan 13
7 1984 Maastricht  Netherlands 13
8 1986 Sydney  Australia 15
9 1988 Cairo  Egypt 16
10 1990 Mexico City  Mexico 16
11 1992 Granada  Spain 16
12 1994 Kota Kinabalu  Malaysia 16
13 1996 Sun City  South Africa 17
14 1998 Rio de Janeiro  Brazil 17
15 2000 Munich  Germany 17
16 2002 Madrid  Spain 17
17 2004 Monterrey  Mexico 17
18 2006 Tampere  Finland 17
19 2008 Tokyo  Japan 17
20 2010 Belgrade  Serbia 16
21 2012 Paris  France 16
22 2014 Bremen  Germany 16
23 2016 Linz  Austria 16
24 2018 Madrid  Spain 16
25 2021 Dubai  United Arab Emirates 16
26 2023 Budapest  Hungary 16

All-time medal table

The following reflects the all-time medal counts as of the 2018 World Karate Championships:

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1 Japan945358205
2 France564669171
3 Great Britain29222576
4 Spain233069122
5 Italy203661117
6 Turkey12103456
7 Netherlands10111940
8 Iran1082341
9 Germany8133253
10 Egypt8102543
11 Azerbaijan85619
12 United States6121937
13 Brazil55717
14 Serbia52613
15 Venezuela431017
16 Finland43815
17 Croatia341118
18 Russia34916
19 Sweden34613
20 Greece34310
21 Australia331016
22 Mexico2349
23 Austria22711
24 Serbia and Montenegro2068
25 Georgia2013
26 Norway15410
27 Chinese Taipei13711
28 Vietnam1304
29 China1214
30 Slovakia11810
31  Switzerland1168
32 Netherlands Antilles1135
33 Chile1113
34 Senegal1102
35 Benin1012
36 Estonia1001
 Poland1001
 South Africa1001
 Uzbekistan1001
40 Hungary0437
41 Canada0358
42 Bosnia and Herzegovina0347
43 Ukraine0257
44 Yugoslavia0224
45 Tunisia0213
46 Peru0189
47 Kazakhstan0178
48 Belgium0145
 Denmark0145
50 Morocco0134
51 Malaysia0123
52 Czech Republic0112
 Guatemala0112
 Luxembourg0112
 North Macedonia0112
56 Czechoslovakia0101
 Paraguay0101
58 Slovenia003030
59 Algeria0022
 Bulgaria0022
 Hong Kong0022
 Romania0022
63 Argentina0011
 Colombia0011
 Dominican Republic0011
IOA0011
 Indonesia0011
 Kosovo0011
 Latvia0011
 Montenegro0011
 Philippines0011
 Singapore0011
Totals (72 nations)3393396591337

See also

References

  1. ^ Coleman, Jim (September 1992). "Questions and Answers with Wuko's Head Man". Black Belt Magazine. Active Interest Media. 30 (9): 30–33. Retrieved 8 November 2014.
  2. ^ a b "Black Belt". Active Interest Media. February 1974. p. 34. Retrieved 21 December 2014 – via Internet Archive. ((cite magazine)): Cite magazine requires |magazine= (help)
  3. ^ Malaysia welcome extra category. Thestar.com.my (2008-11-19). Retrieved on 2011-05-14, Archived from the original on October 18, 2012 on the Wayback Machine
  4. ^ Sports: Three fighters, one heart. Mike Camunas, March 7, 2008, Sptimes.com. Retrieved on 2011-05-14, Archived from the original on March 4, 2016 on the Wayback Machine.
  5. ^ Mmegi Online :: Karate team leaves for WFK Championships. Mmegi.bw (2010-10-22). Retrieved on 2011-05-14.
  6. ^ Olympic Bid Sports Capsules – Olympics – ESPN. Sports.espn.go.com (2009-06-14). Retrieved on 2011-05-14.
  7. ^ Vacoe, Fred (November 8, 2008). "World Karate Championships returning to Japan". Japan Today. Retrieved 2010-02-23.
  8. ^ "Karate World Championship to be Held in Belgrade Next Year". Ministry of Sport. Retrieved 2011-05-04.
  9. ^ a b "World Wide Tourneys". Black Belt Magazine. Active Interest Media. February 1974. p. 56. Retrieved 21 December 2014 – via Internet Archive.
  10. ^ Young, Jim (February 1974). "Contact Karate Tournaments, Will they separate the fighters from the actors?". Black Belt Magazine. Active Interest Media. p. 15. Retrieved 21 December 2014 – via Internet Archive.
  11. ^ "Poland holds first national karate meeting". Black Belt Magazine. Active Interest Media. February 1974. p. 12. Retrieved 21 December 2014 – via Internet Archive.
  12. ^ "Black Belt - Internet Archive". Internet Archive. February 1974. p. 12. Retrieved 2015-09-27. ((cite magazine)): Cite magazine requires |magazine= (help)
  13. ^ "Kata Rules. World Karate Federation". YouTube. 2016-04-08. Archived from the original on 2021-12-21. Retrieved 2020-05-24.