Kumaran
Gombak Selangor Batu-Caves-01.jpg
Entrance to Batu Caves, Malaysia, with the Lord Murugan statue
Regions with significant populations
South India • Sri Lanka  • Singapore • Malaysia
Religions
Shaivism
Scriptures
Thiruppugal
Languages
Tamil • others
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Related ethnic groups
Tamils
Website
kaumaram.com
murugan.org
The Om symbol in Tamil. Om in the Tamil script is seen in most Murugan temples.
The Om symbol in Tamil. Om in the Tamil script is seen in most Murugan temples.

Murugan is a Hindu denomination that primarily venerates the Hindu deity of war, Kumaran, also known as Murugan (in South India), Kandan, or Kadamban, or Kartikeya, aarumugan, . Most devotees of Kumaran also revere members of his family: Parvati, Shiva, and Ganesha, as well his consorts, Devasena and Sundaravalli, the daughters of Vishnu in Tamil tradition.[1] The important theological texts relating to Kumara are a part of the Shaiva agama canon. This sub-tradition is found among the Tamils, Kannadigas, and the Vedda, in South India, Sri Lanka, and among the Tamil diaspora worldwide.[2] The love story of Kumara/Murugan and his wife Valli, a girl from a local tribe, is popular in Tamil Nadu, where Kumara acquired the status of a national god.[3][note 1]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ The term Kaumaram also means "childhood, youth" in Hindu texts, as in verse 2.13 of the Bhagavad Gita.[4] It is sometimes a substitute for Brahmacharya stage of life.[5]

References

  1. ^ Sc, Subhash C. Biswas D. (2014-09-29). India the Land of Gods. PartridgeIndia. p. 149. ISBN 978-1-4828-3655-4.
  2. ^ Roshen Dalal (2010). Hinduism: An Alphabetical Guide. New Delhi: Penguin Books India. pp. 417–418, 137, 198–199, 241, 425. ISBN 978-0-14-341421-6.
  3. ^ Kamil V. Zvelebil (1981). "Murugan and Valli". Tiru Murugan. Madras: Ulakat Tamilaraycci Niruvanam. pp. 40–46.
  4. ^ Winthrop Sargeant; Christopher Key Chapple (1984). The Bhagavad Gita: Revised Edition. State University of New York Press. p. 98. ISBN 978-0-87395-831-8.
  5. ^ Suresh Chandra (1998). Encyclopaedia of Hindu Gods and Goddesses. Sarup & Sons. p. 63. ISBN 978-81-7625-039-9.