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The Kavli Foundation
Formation2000
HeadquartersLos Angeles, CA, United States
President and Chief Executive Officer
Cynthia M. Friend
Revenue (2015)
$42,439,383[1]
Expenses (2015)$54,389,074[1]
Websitewww.kavlifoundation.org

The Kavli Foundation, based in Los Angeles, California, is a foundation that supports the advancement of science and the increase of public understanding and support for scientists and their work.

The Kavli Foundation was established in December 2000 by its founder and benefactor, Fred Kavli, a Norwegian business leader and philanthropist, who made his money by creating Kavlico, a company that made sensors, and by investing in real estate in southern California and Nevada. David Auston, a former president of Case Western Reserve University and former Bell Labs scientist, was the first president of the Kavli Foundation and is largely credited with the vision of the scientific investments. Kavli died in 2013, and his foundation is currently actively involved in establishing research institutes at universities throughout the United States, in Europe, and in Asia.

To date, the Kavli Foundation has made grants to establish Kavli Institutes on the campuses of 16 major universities. In addition to the Kavli Institutes, six Kavli professorships have been established: two at University of California, Santa Barbara, one each at University of California, Los Angeles, University of California, Irvine, Columbia University, Cornell University, and California Institute of Technology.

The Kavli Prize

The Kavli Prizes recognize scientists for seminal advances in three research areas: astrophysics, nanoscience and neuroscience. Consisting of a scroll, medal and cash award of one million dollars, a prize in each of these areas is to be awarded every two years beginning in 2008. The Kavli Prizes are presented in cooperation with the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters, the Norwegian Ministry of Education and Research, and the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs (Norway is Kavli's native country).

The recipients are to be chosen by three prize committees of distinguished scientists recommended by the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the French Academy of Sciences, the Max Planck Society, the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and The Royal Society. After making their selection for award recipients, the recommendations of these prize committees are to be confirmed by the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters.

The Kavli Institutes

Astrophysics

Nanoscience

Neuroscience

Theoretical physics

References

  1. ^ a b "The Kavli Foundation" (PDF). Foundation Center. Retrieved 28 November 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. ^ "Stanford University - The Kavli Foundation".
  3. ^ "University of Chicago | The Kavli Foundation". www.kavlifoundation.org. Retrieved 2020-08-25.
  4. ^ "Massachusetts Institute of Technology | The Kavli Foundation". www.kavlifoundation.org. Retrieved 2020-08-25.
  5. ^ "Peking University | The Kavli Foundation". www.kavlifoundation.org. Retrieved 2020-08-25.
  6. ^ "University of Cambridge - The Kavli Foundation".
  7. ^ "Cornell University - The Kavli Foundation".
  8. ^ "California Institute of Technology | The Kavli Foundation". www.kavlifoundation.org. Retrieved 2020-08-25.
  9. ^ "Harvard University | The Kavli Foundation". www.kavlifoundation.org. Retrieved 2020-08-25.
  10. ^ "Berkeley | The Kavli Foundation". www.kavlifoundation.org. Retrieved 2020-09-16.
  11. ^ "Columbia University | The Kavli Foundation". www.kavlifoundation.org. Retrieved 2020-08-25.
  12. ^ "University of California, San Diego | The Kavli Foundation". www.kavlifoundation.org. Retrieved 2020-08-25.
  13. ^ "Yale University | The Kavli Foundation". www.kavlifoundation.org. Retrieved 2020-08-25.
  14. ^ "Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) - The Kavli Foundation".
  15. ^ "Chinese Academy of Sciences | The Kavli Foundation". web.archive.org. 2009-10-27. Retrieved 2020-08-25.

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