Kherson oat is a spring oat.[1]

Summary

In 1896, this kind of oat was introduced to the United States from Southern Russia by the Nebraska Agricultural Experiment Station although its origin is unknown.[2] In 1919, it was grown in about three million acres.[3] Not many oat varieties in the United States are better than the Kherson in economic importance or in prospective value. It is one of the most distributed early choices, especially in the Corn Belt and the central section of the Great Plains area.[4]

It was put through an experiment to decide whether the Sixty Day oat or the Kherson oat was better for the country.[5][6] For the two years, that Kherson oat was studied and yielded, it was averaged slightly better than other kinds.[7]

References

  1. ^ Stanton, Thomas Ray (1955-01-01). Oat Identification and Classification. U.S. Dept. of Agriculture.
  2. ^ Warburton, Clyde William; Stanton, Thomas Ray (1920-01-01). Experiments with Kherson and Sixty-day Oats. U.S. Department of Agriculture.
  3. ^ Stanton, Thomas Ray (1955-01-01). Oat Identification and Classification. U.S. Dept. of Agriculture.
  4. ^ http://naldc.nal.usda.gov/download/IND43967037/PDF[bare URL PDF]
  5. ^ "Sixty-Day and Kherson Oats". 1910.
  6. ^ Warburton, Clyde William; Stanton, Thomas Ray (1920-01-01). Experiments with Kherson and Sixty-day Oats. U.S. Department of Agriculture.
  7. ^ Warburton, Clyde William; Stanton, Thomas Ray (1920-01-01). Experiments with Kherson and Sixty-day Oats. U.S. Department of Agriculture.