This article may require cleanup to meet Wikipedia's quality standards. The specific problem is: Full of incorrect grammar and no sources cited. Please help improve this article if you can. (December 2020) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)
Andrei Ryabushkin. A young man breaking into a girls' khorovod, a 1902 painting
Andrei Ryabushkin. A young man breaking into a girls' khorovod, a 1902 painting

The khorovod or horovod (Russian: хорово́д, IPA: [xərɐˈvot], Ukrainian: хоровод, romanizedkhorovod or коло, kolo, Belarusian: карагод [karaˈɣot], Bulgarian: хоро, Polish: korowód) is an East Slavic and pagan art form and one of the oldest dances of Russia with its more than 1,000 years history.[1] It is a combination of a circle dance and chorus singing, similar to the choreia of ancient Greece. The dance was also known in Rus' as karagod, tanok and krug.

Etymology

The term khorovod probably descended from the Greek Choreia (Ancient Greek: χορεία). Greek culture had a strong impact on Rus' culture. It is related to choreia (Greek circle dance), kolo dance (South Slavic circle dance in Serbia, Croatia and Bosnia), hora dance (Balkans), kochari (Armenian and Azerbaijani folk dance).

Origin and characteristics

The most significant features of the khorovod dance is to hold hands or the little finger of the partners while dancing in a circle.

The circle dance symbolised in ancient Russian culture "moving around the sun" and was a pagan rite with the meaning of unity and friendship. The female organizer or leader of the dance was called khorovodnitsa.

Regional difference in Russia

The khorovod dance has own characteristics in the different regions of Old Russia.

In the northern Russian regions, the round dance was known for its gentle and subtle manner, while in the central Russian regions, the dance was more cheerful and lighthearted. Russian folk songs accompanied the dance. The people kicked, clapped and made quick and energetic movements. Dances in southern Russia, with its warm, mild weather, were famous for their rapid, hot-blooded movements and complex patterns, embodying strength, boundless energy and youth.[2][3]

Belgorod region, Russia. The world record, 2511 people participated in a patterned round dance, this is the largest circle dance on the planet.
Belgorod region, Russia. The world record, 2511 people participated in a patterned round dance, this is the largest circle dance on the planet.

See also

References

  1. ^ RBTH, Daria Krylova (2017-01-05). "8 facts about the khorovod, Russia's oldest dance". www.rbth.com. Retrieved 2019-05-21.
  2. ^ "Russian dance Khorovod | RusClothing.com". www.rusclothing.com. Retrieved 2019-05-21.
  3. ^ RBTH, Daria Krylova (2017-01-05). "8 facts about the khorovod, Russia's oldest dance". www.rbth.com. Retrieved 2019-05-21.