Kim Ha-na
김하나
Kim Ha-na at the 2013 French Super Series
Personal information
CountrySouth Korea
Born (1989-12-27) 27 December 1989 (age 32)
Jeju, South Korea[1]
Height1.72 m (5 ft 8 in)[1]
Weight51 kg (112 lb)
HandednessRight
Women's & mixed doubles
Highest ranking5 (WD 16 January 2014)
1 (XD 22 September 2016)[1]
BWF profile

Kim Ha-na (Hangul: 김하나; Korean pronunciation: [kim.ɦa.na] or [kim] [ha.na]; born 27 December 1989) is a South Korean badminton player. She was the mixed doubles gold medalist at the 2013 Asian Championships, and was part of the national team that won the Sudirman Cup in 2017. Kim won her first Superseries title at the 2012 India Open in the women's doubles event.[2] She reached a career high of world no. 1 in the mixed doubles in September 2016.[3]

Kim Ha-na (right) with Jung Kyung-eun became the runner-up at the 2011 U.S. Open.
Kim Ha-na (right) with Jung Kyung-eun became the runner-up at the 2011 U.S. Open.
Kim Ha-na (right) with her partner in mixed doubles Ko Sung-hyun (June 2016).
Kim Ha-na (right) with her partner in mixed doubles Ko Sung-hyun (June 2016).

Sport career

At the 2012 Summer Olympics, Kim and her partner Jung Kyung-eun, along with Ha Jung-eun, Kim Min-jung, Wang Xiaoli, Yu Yang, Meiliana Jauhari and Greysia Polii were disqualified from the competition because their efforts were not focused on winning their matches, and their conduct was in a way that was harmful and violent to the sport.[4] They were also accused of trying to lose in order to manipulate the draw.[4] Kim and her partner Jung Kyung-eun played against China's Wang Xiaoli and Yu Yang.[5] South Korea filed an appeal to the Badminton World Federation at the Olympics, but it was rejected.[4]

She competed at the 2014 Asian Games.[6]

She competed at the 2016 Rio Olympics, in the mixed doubles with Ko Sung-hyun.[7] They were knocked out in the quarterfinals by the Chinese pair of Xu Chen and Ma Jin.[7]

In 2017, she helped the Korean national team compete at the 2017 Sudirman Cup and won that tournament.[8][9]

Achievements

Asian Championships

Women's doubles

Year Venue Partner Opponent Score Result
2014 Gimcheon Indoor Stadium, Gimcheon, South Korea South Korea Jung Kyung-eun China Luo Ying
China Luo Yu
18–21, 18–21
Silver

Mixed doubles

Year Venue Partner Opponent Score Result
2013 Taipei Arena, Taipei, Chinese Taipei South Korea Ko Sung-hyun China Zhang Nan
China Zhao Yunlei
22–20, 21–17
Gold
2016 Wuhan Sports Center Gymnasium, Wuhan, China South Korea Ko Sung-hyun China Zhang Nan
China Zhao Yunlei
19–21, 11–21
Bronze

BWF World Tour (1 title)

The BWF World Tour, announced on 19 March 2017 and implemented in 2018,[10] is a series of elite badminton tournaments, sanctioned by Badminton World Federation (BWF). The BWF World Tour are divided into six levels, namely World Tour Finals, Super 1000, Super 750, Super 500, Super 300 (part of the HSBC World Tour), and the BWF Tour Super 100.[11]

Mixed doubles

Year Tournament Level Partner Opponent Score Result
2020 Spain Masters Super 300 South Korea Kim Sa-rang France Thom Gicquel
France Delphine Delrue
15–21, 21–11, 21–10 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner

BWF Superseries (6 titles, 8 runners-up)

The BWF Superseries, launched on 14 December 2006 and implemented in 2007,[12] is a series of elite badminton tournaments, sanctioned by Badminton World Federation (BWF). BWF Superseries has two level such as Superseries and Superseries Premier. A season of Superseries features twelve tournaments around the world, which introduced since 2011,[13] with successful players invited to the Superseries Finals held at the year end.

Women's doubles

Year Tournament Partner Opponent Score Result
2012 India Open South Korea Jung Kyung-eun China Bao Yixin
China Zhong Qianxin
21–17, 21–18 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2014 India Open South Korea Jung Kyung-eun China Tang Yuanting
China Yu Yang
10–21, 21–13, 16–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2017 Japan Open South Korea Kong Hee-yong Japan Misaki Matsutomo
Japan Ayaka Takahashi
18–21, 16–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up

Mixed doubles

Year Tournament Partner Opponent Score Result
2013 India Open South Korea Ko Sung-hyun Indonesia Tontowi Ahmad
Indonesia Liliyana Natsir
16–21, 13–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2014 India Open South Korea Ko Sung-hyun Denmark Joachim Fischer Nielsen
Denmark Christinna Pedersen
16–21, 21–18, 18–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2014 Australian Open South Korea Ko Sung-hyun Germany Michael Fuchs
Germany Birgit Michels
21–16, 21–17 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2015 Denmark Open South Korea Ko Sung-hyun Indonesia Tontowi Ahmad
Indonesia Liliyana Natsir
20–22, 21–18, 21–9 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2015 French Open South Korea Ko Sung-hyun Indonesia Praveen Jordan
Indonesia Debby Susanto
21–10, 15–21, 21–19 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2015 Dubai World Superseries Finals South Korea Ko Sung-hyun England Chris Adcock
England Gabby Adcock
14–21, 17–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2016 Singapore Open South Korea Ko Sung-hyun China Xu Chen
China Ma Jin
21–17, 21–14 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2016 Indonesia Open South Korea Ko Sung-hyun China Xu Chen
China Ma Jin
15–21, 21–16, 13–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2016 Japan Open South Korea Ko Sung-hyun China Zheng Siwei
China Chen Qingchen
10–21, 15–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2016 Korea Open South Korea Ko Sung-hyun China Zheng Siwei
China Chen Qingchen
21–14, 21–19 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2016 French Open South Korea Ko Sung-hyun China Zheng Siwei
China Chen Qingchen
16–21, 15–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
  BWF Superseries Finals tournament
  BWF Superseries Premier tournament
  BWF Superseries tournament

BWF Grand Prix (11 titles, 7 runners-up)

The BWF Grand Prix had two levels, the BWF Grand Prix and Grand Prix Gold. It was a series of badminton tournaments sanctioned by the Badminton World Federation (BWF) which was held from 2007 to 2017.

Women's doubles

Year Tournament Partner Opponent Score Result
2010 Korea Grand Prix South Korea Eom Hye-won South Korea Jung Kyung-eun
South Korea Yoo Hyun-young
16–21, 21–18, 19–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2011 Swiss Open South Korea Jung Kyung-eun South Korea Ha Jung-eun
South Korea Kim Min-jung
12–21, 13–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2011 U.S. Open South Korea Jung Kyung-eun South Korea Ha Jung-eun
South Korea Kim Min-jung
21–14, 20–22, 18–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2011 Macau Open South Korea Jung Kyung-eun South Korea Eom Hye-won
South Korea Jang Ye-na
8–4 retired 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2012 German Open South Korea Jung Kyung-eun China Tang Jinhua
China Xia Huan
21–23, 13–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2013 German Open South Korea Jung Kyung-eun China Ma Jin
China Tang Jinhua
11–21, 21–14, 21–13 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2013 Swiss Open South Korea Jung Kyung-eun South Korea Lee So-hee
South Korea Shin Seung-chan
23–21, 21–16 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2013 Chinese Taipei Open South Korea Jung Kyung-eun South Korea Lee So-hee
South Korea Shin Seung-chan
Walkover 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2014 German Open South Korea Jung Kyung-eun Japan Misaki Matsutomo
Japan Ayaka Takahashi
21–23, 22–24 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up

Mixed doubles

Year Tournament Partner Opponent Score Result
2014 German Open South Korea Ko Sung-hyun Scotland Robert Blair
Scotland Imogen Bankier
15–21, 18–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2015 Chinese Taipei Open South Korea Ko Sung-hyun South Korea Shin Baek-cheol
South Korea Chae Yoo-jung
21–16, 21–18 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2015 Korea Masters South Korea Ko Sung-hyun South Korea Shin Baek-cheol
South Korea Chae Yoo-jung
19–21, 21–17, 21–19 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2016 German Open South Korea Ko Sung-hyun South Korea Shin Baek-cheol
South Korea Chae Yoo-jung
21–19, 21–12 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2016 Korea Masters South Korea Ko Sung-hyun Thailand Dechapol Puavaranukroh
Thailand Sapsiree Taerattanachai
21–19, 21–16 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2017 Chinese Taipei Open South Korea Seo Seung-jae Chinese Taipei Wang Chi-lin
Chinese Taipei Lee Chia-hsin
22–20, 21–10 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2017 U.S. Open South Korea Seo Seung-jae South Korea Kim Won-ho
South Korea Shin Seung-chan
16–21, 21–14, 21–11 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2017 Macau Open South Korea Seo Seung-jae China Zheng Siwei
China Huang Yaqiong
14–21, 11–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2017 Korea Masters South Korea Seo Seung-jae South Korea Choi Sol-gyu
South Korea Chae Yoo-jung
17–21, 21–13, 21–18 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
  BWF Grand Prix Gold tournament
  BWF Grand Prix tournament

BWF International Challenge/Series (1 title, 2 runners-up)

Mixed doubles

Year Tournament Partner Opponent Score Result
2019 Dubai International South Korea Kim Sa-rang Russia Rodion Alimov
Russia Alina Davletova
20–22, 16–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2019 Hungarian International South Korea Kim Sa-rang Denmark Mathias Christiansen
Denmark Alexandra Bøje
21–12, 21–15 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2019 Nepal International South Korea Kim Sa-rang Thailand Supak Jomkoh
Thailand Supissara Paewsampran
18–21, 16–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
  BWF International Challenge tournament
  BWF International Series tournament

References

  1. ^ a b c "KIM Ha Na Player Profile". bwf.tournamentsoftware.com. Retrieved 17 April 2016.
  2. ^ "South Korea's Jung Kyung-eun and Kim Ha-na". BBC.Com.UK. 1 August 2012. Retrieved 1 August 2012.
  3. ^ "고성현·김하나, BWF 세계랭킹 '혼합복식 1위'". kbs.co.kr (in Korean). 30 September 2016. Archived from the original on 20 December 2020. Retrieved 20 December 2020.
  4. ^ a b c "Olympics badminton: Eight women disqualified from doubles". BBC.Com.UK. 1 August 2012. Retrieved 2 August 2012.
  5. ^ "Reports: Eight Badminton Players Tossed Out Of Olympics". NPR.Org. 31 July 2012. Retrieved 2 August 2012.
  6. ^ "KIM Hana". Incheon 2014 official website. Archived from the original on 10 July 2015. Retrieved 9 July 2015.
  7. ^ a b "Kim Ha-Na Bio, Stats, and Results". Olympics at Sports-Reference.com. Archived from the original on 17 April 2020. Retrieved 22 December 2018.
  8. ^ "Big Guns Prevail – Day 1 (Session 2):Total BWF Sudirman Cup 2017". Badminton World Federation. Archived from the original on 24 May 2017. Retrieved 29 May 2017.
  9. ^ "Korea wins Sudirman Cup badminton final on Gold Coast". Gold Coast Bulletin. Retrieved 29 May 2017.
  10. ^ Alleyne, Gayle (19 March 2017). "BWF Launches New Events Structure". bwfbadminton.com. Badminton World Federation. Archived from the original on 1 December 2017. Retrieved 29 November 2017.
  11. ^ Sukumar, Dev (10 January 2018). "Action-Packed Season Ahead!". bwfbadminton.com. Badminton World Federation. Archived from the original on 13 January 2018. Retrieved 15 January 2018.
  12. ^ "BWF Launches Super Series". Badminton Australia. 15 December 2006. Archived from the original on 6 October 2007.
  13. ^ "Yonex All England Elevated To BWF Premier Super Series Event". www.ibadmintonstore.com. Archived from the original on 2 October 2013. Retrieved 29 September 2013.