Kim Ng
Miami Marlins
General Manager
Born: (1968-11-17) November 17, 1968 (age 53)
Indianapolis, Indiana, U.S.
Teams
As assistant director of baseball operations

As assistant general manager

As general manager

Career highlights and awards
Chinese name
Chinese伍佩琴

Kimberly J. Ng[1] (/ɛŋ/; born November 17, 1968) is an American executive in Major League Baseball. She is currently the general manager of the Miami Marlins and the highest-ranking female baseball executive. She is the first woman to serve as general manager of a team in the Big Four leagues in North America and the first person of East Asian descent to serve as general manager of an MLB team.[2]

A graduate of the University of Chicago, Ng played college softball. She then worked her way up in the front office of several Major League Baseball teams and became a vice president of the league. She was named the Marlins' general manager in 2020.

Early life

Ng was born in Indianapolis, Indiana,[3][4] the first of five daughters, to Virginia (née Fong) and Jin Ng. Her father, an American of Cantonese Chinese descent, was a financial analyst,[5] and her mother, Thailand-born of Chinese descent, was a banker.[6][7][8] She attended elementary school in Fresh Meadows, Queens[9] and junior high on Long Island, New York. Her interest in baseball started when she played stickball on the street in Queens and her father taught her about sports.[5] She played tennis and softball at Ridgewood High School in Ridgewood, New Jersey and graduated in 1986.[10][11] She graduated from the University of Chicago in 1990, where she played softball for four years and was named MVP infielder, and earned a B.A. in public policy.[12][13] During her senior year at University of Chicago, she served as president of the university's Women's Athletic Association.[14]

Career

Ng began her career as an intern with the Chicago White Sox after graduating from the University of Chicago. She was hired full-time in 1991[15] and became special projects analyst before being promoted to Assistant Director of Baseball Operations under then-GM Ron Schueler in 1995.[8] In 1995 she became the youngest person, and the first woman, to present a salary arbitration case in the major leagues when she worked for the White Sox, regarding the case of pitcher Alex Fernandez, and won.[16] She then worked in the offices of the American League in 1997, where she was Director of Waivers and Records, approving all transactions.[17]

In March 1998,[18] she was recruited by general manager Brian Cashman to work for the New York Yankees as assistant general manager, becoming the youngest in the major leagues, at age 29, and the second woman ever to hold the position[10] behind only Elaine Weddington Steward, who, in 1990, became the assistant general manager of the Boston Red Sox[19] She joined the Los Angeles Dodgers as vice president and assistant general manager in 2001.[20]

In 2005, Ng was interviewed for the vacant position of Dodgers general manager. No female had ever been a GM in any major sport. The Dodgers hired Ned Colletti as their GM, who immediately kept Ng on as his assistant.[21] Between 2005 and 2020, Ng interviewed for the general manager position with at least five teams,[22] including the Seattle Mariners, San Diego Padres, Anaheim Angels, and San Francisco Giants. On March 8, 2011, Ng announced that she was leaving the Dodgers to take on the position of senior vice president of baseball operations for Major League Baseball, where she would report to former Yankees and Dodgers manager Joe Torre.[23][24]

Marlins general manager

See also: List of managers of Asian heritage in sports leagues in the United States and Canada

On November 13, 2020, Ng was hired as general manager of the Miami Marlins. She became the first woman to become a general manager of a men's team in the history of major North American sports, as well as the first female Asian-American and first East Asian-American general manager in MLB history.[2][25][26] In the Marlins' first season under Ng, they finished fourth in the National League East with a 67–95 record.

Awards

In 2014, Bleacher Report included Ng on its list of the 25 Most Powerful Women in Sports.[27] In 2015, Forbes ranked Ng #13 on its list of the most influential minorities in sports[28] and #5 on its list of the most powerful women in sports.[29] In 2017, Adweek named Ng one of the most powerful women in sports.[30]

Ng was selected for the inaugural 2021 Forbes 50 Over 50; made up of entrepreneurs, leaders, scientists and creators who are over the age of 50.[31]

Personal life

Ng is married to Tony Markward, co-owner of Silas Wines in Oregon.[32]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Making it in the Majors: Kimberly Ng, AB'90". University of Chicago College Report. Archived from the original on June 18, 2010. Retrieved September 15, 2014.
  2. ^ a b "Marlins hire Kim Ng as MLB's first female GM". ESPN.com. November 13, 2020. Archived from the original on November 13, 2020. Retrieved November 13, 2020.
  3. ^ Reid, Jason (November 15, 2003). "Ng Is Victim of Racial Taunts". The Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on September 15, 2014. Retrieved September 14, 2014.
  4. ^ Eng, Sherri (2011). "Dodgers Assistant General Manager Kim Ng Ready to Make the Jump to Top Job". Society for American Baseball Research. Archived from the original on November 13, 2020. Retrieved November 13, 2020.
  5. ^ a b Pasan, Jeff (December 14, 2005). "A woman running a baseball team? It's inevitable". The Chicago Tribune. Archived from the original on September 15, 2014. Retrieved September 15, 2014.
  6. ^ "Kim Ng, executive for major league baseball was hired by the New York Yankees as assistant general manager". Museum of Chinese in America. 1997. Archived from the original on September 15, 2014. Retrieved September 14, 2014.
  7. ^ Reid Forgrave (May 11, 2012). "Kim Ng unfazed in quest to become GM". Fox Sports. Archived from the original on May 13, 2012. Retrieved May 11, 2012.
  8. ^ a b Brown, Tim (July 3, 2008). "Can Kim Ng break the gender barrier?". Yahoo! Sports. Archived from the original on September 15, 2014. Retrieved September 14, 2014.
  9. ^ McCarron, Anthony (March 4, 2001). "POWER OF A WOMAN Yanks' Ng is front-office ace in male-dominated field". New York Daily News. Archived from the original on September 15, 2014. Retrieved September 14, 2014.
  10. ^ a b "Glimpses". University of Chicago Magazine. October 2004. Archived from the original on January 21, 2013. Retrieved September 14, 2014.
  11. ^ Kleimann, James (October 20, 2011). "Ridgewood Native Kim Ng Could be Baseball's First Female GM". Ridgewood-Glen Rock Patch. Archived from the original on November 13, 2020. Retrieved November 13, 2020.
  12. ^ Kaplan, David A. (December 24, 2006). "Kim Ng". Newsweek. Archived from the original on September 15, 2014. Retrieved September 15, 2014.
  13. ^ Kohen, Yael (July 18, 2012). "Game Changer". Marie Claire. Archived from the original on September 16, 2014. Retrieved September 16, 2014.
  14. ^ "How Kim Ng, MLB's First Female GM, Finally Got the Top Job". Time. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  15. ^ Leong, Ryan (May 14, 2004). "Batter Up for Kim Ng: Q&A with the Dodgers' assistant general manager". AsianWeek. Archived from the original on September 15, 2014. Retrieved September 14, 2014.
  16. ^ "Baseball executive in US breaks mold". Taipei Times. May 12, 2002. Archived from the original on April 27, 2015. Retrieved September 15, 2014.
  17. ^ McDonnell, Jr., Wayne G. (August 30, 2011). "Cubs Need A 'Dynamic Duo' Instead Of Cashman Or Epstein". Forbes. Archived from the original on March 3, 2016. Retrieved September 15, 2014.
  18. ^ Olney, Buster (March 4, 1998). "Woman Will Be Yankee Executive". New York Times. Archived from the original on May 27, 2015.
  19. ^ "HERStory: Elaine Weddington Steward (1963 - )". The General Court of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Archived from the original on February 12, 2021. Retrieved February 4, 2022.
  20. ^ "Kim Ng Vice President and Assistant General Manager". Los Angeles Dodgers. Archived from the original on October 11, 2014. Retrieved September 14, 2014.
  21. ^ Jenkins, Lee (November 17, 2005). "In Choosing Experience, Dodgers Forgo a Chance at History". The New York Times. Archived from the original on October 24, 2014. Retrieved September 15, 2014.
  22. ^ "Kim Ng named first female MLB general manager". HISTORY. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  23. ^ Shaikin, Bill (March 8, 2011). "Kim Ng on leaving Dodgers: I still want to be a GM". Los Angeles Times.
  24. ^ Gurnick, Ken (March 8, 2011). "Ng leaving Dodgers to join Torre with MLB". MLB. Archived from the original on September 15, 2014. Retrieved September 15, 2014.
  25. ^ Hoffman, Benjamin (November 13, 2020). "Miami Marlins Hire Kim Ng as Baseball's First Female G.M." The New York Times. Archived from the original on November 13, 2020. Retrieved November 13, 2020.
  26. ^ Wine, Steven (November 13, 2020). "Miami Marlins make Kim Ng the 1st female GM in MLB history". CBC News. Retrieved November 13, 2020.
  27. ^ Lee, Amber. "25 of the Most Influential Women in Sports". Bleacher Report. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  28. ^ Belzer, Jason. "The Most Influential Minorities In Sports". Forbes. Archived from the original on August 7, 2017. Retrieved July 17, 2017.
  29. ^ Belzer, Jason. "The Most Powerful Women In Sports". Forbes. Archived from the original on August 7, 2017. Retrieved July 17, 2017.
  30. ^ Stanley, T.L. "The Most Powerful Women in Sports: 35 Executives and Influencers Winning Over the Next Generation of Fans". Adweek. Archived from the original on July 16, 2017. Retrieved July 17, 2017.
  31. ^ Gross, Elana Lyn; Voytko, Lisette; McGrath, Maggie (June 2, 2021). "The New Golden Age". Forbes. Retrieved June 2, 2021.
  32. ^ Specter, Emma (November 13, 2020). "5 Things to Know About Kim Ng, the MLB's First Female, Asian American General Manager". Vogue. Retrieved November 16, 2020.