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A pair of king's earrings, made from gold and jade, early 6th century (Baekje). From tomb of King Munyeong
A pair of king's earrings, made from gold and jade, early 6th century (Baekje). From tomb of King Munyeong

The tradition of Korean jade carving dates back to neolithic finds along the Namgang river basin in Gyeongju. Jade rings and accessories were worn by the higher classes of society, especially women, from the three kingdoms period and reached their peak in the Joseon dynasty, the golden age of jadework. Korean jadework often includes Buddhist motifs, cicadas, and peanut-shaped good luck talismans on the small scale, as well as larger-scale architectural pieces.

Local markets

In the local markets there now exists a wide variety of jade carvings and jewelry available for purchase. These items are much less costly than their Chinese counterparts.

See also