This is a list of International Congresses of Mathematicians Plenary and Invited Speakers. Being invited to talk at an International Congress of Mathematicians has been called "the equivalent, in this community, of an induction to a hall of fame."[1] The current list of Plenary and Invited Speakers presented here is based on the ICM's post-WW II terminology, in which the one-hour speakers in the morning sessions are called "Plenary Speakers" and the other speakers (in the afternoon sessions) whose talks are included in the ICM published proceedings are called "Invited Speakers". In the pre-WW II congresses the Plenary Speakers were called "Invited Speakers".

By congress year

1897, Zürich

Felix Klein
Felix Klein

1900, Paris

David Hilbert
David Hilbert

During the 1900 Congress in Paris, France, David Hilbert (pictured) announced his famous list of Hilbert's problems.[2]

1904, Heidelberg

Emile Borel
Emile Borel
Heinrich Weber
Heinrich Weber

1908, Rome

Tullio Levi-Civita
Tullio Levi-Civita

1912, Cambridge (UK)

G. H. Hardy
G. H. Hardy
Edward Kasner
Edward Kasner
J. J. Thomson
J. J. Thomson

1920, Strasbourg

Jacques Hadamard
Jacques Hadamard

1924, Toronto

Arthur Eddington
Arthur Eddington

1928, Bologna

George David Birkhoff
George David Birkhoff
Stefan Banach
Stefan Banach
Emmy Noether
Emmy Noether
Hermann Weyl
Hermann Weyl
Guido Fubini
Guido Fubini

1932, Zürich

Participants Zürich 1932
Participants Zürich 1932

1936, Oslo

Samuel Eilenberg
Samuel Eilenberg
Erich Hecke
Erich Hecke
Oswald Veblen
Oswald Veblen

1950, Cambridge (USA)

Eberhard Hopf
Eberhard Hopf
Shiing-Shen Chern
Shiing-Shen Chern

1954, Amsterdam

André Weil
André Weil

At the 1954 Congress of Mathematicians in Amsterdam, Richard Brauer announced his program for the classification of finite simple groups.[5]

1958, Edinburgh

Alexander Grothendieck (pictured) in his plenary lecture at the 1958 Congress outlined his programme "to create arithmetic geometry via a (new) reformulation of algebraic geometry, seeking maximal generality."[6]

Alexander Grothendieck
Alexander Grothendieck

1962, Stockholm

At the 1962 Congress in Stockholm Kiyosi Itô (pictured) lectured on how to combine differential geometry and stochastic analysis, and this led to major advances in the 60s and 70s.[7]

Kiyosi Itô
Kiyosi Itô

1966, Moscow

John Griggs Thompson
John Griggs Thompson
Stephen Smale
Stephen Smale
Lennart Carleson
Lennart Carleson

There were thirty-one Invited Addresses (eight in Abstract) at the 1966 congress.[8]

1970, Nice

Michael Artin
Michael Artin
Philip Griffiths
Philip Griffiths
David Mumford
David Mumford
Pierre Deligne
Pierre Deligne
John Horton Conway
John Horton Conway
Alan-Baker
Alan-Baker

1974, Vancouver

Jacques Tits
Jacques Tits
Alain Connes
Alain Connes
William Thurston
William Thurston

1978, Helsinki

Roger Penrose
Roger Penrose
Robert Langlands
Robert Langlands
Shing-Tung Yau
Shing-Tung Yau

1983, Warsaw

René Thom
René Thom
Efim Zelmanov
Efim Zelmanov
Pierre-Louis Lions
Pierre-Louis Lions
Jean Bourgain
Jean Bourgain

1986, Berkeley

Gerd Faltings
Gerd Faltings
Edward Witten
Edward Witten

1990, Kyoto

Grigorji Margulis
Grigorji Margulis
Vaughan Jones
Vaughan Jones
Curtis T. McMullen
Curtis T. McMullen
Jean-Christophe Yoccoz
Jean-Christophe Yoccoz
Shigefumi Mori
Shigefumi Mori

1994, Zürich

Andrew Wiles
Andrew Wiles
Grigori Perelman
Grigori Perelman
Richard Borcherds
Richard Borcherds
Maxim Kontsevich
Maxim Kontsevich

1998, Berlin

Laurent Lafforgue
Laurent Lafforgue
Vladimir Voevodsky
Vladimir Voevodsky
Michael Freedman
Michael Freedman
Simon Donaldson
Simon Donaldson

2002, Beijing

2006, Madrid

Alice Guionnet
Alice Guionnet
Terence Tao
Terence Tao
Wendelin Werner
Wendelin Werner
Elon Lindenstrauss
Elon Lindenstrauss
Stanislav Smirnov
Stanislav Smirnov
Cedric Villani
Cedric Villani

2010, Hyderabad

Artur Ávila
Artur Ávila
Ngô Bảo Châu
Ngô Bảo Châu
S. R. Srinivasa Varadhan
S. R. Srinivasa Varadhan
Maryam Mirzakhani
Maryam Mirzakhani

2014, Seoul

Martin Hairer
Martin Hairer
Alessio Figalli
Alessio Figalli
Peter Scholze
Peter Scholze
John Milnor
John Milnor
Manjul Bhargava
Manjul Bhargava

2018, Rio de Janeiro

Andrei Okounkov
Andrei Okounkov
Laszlo Babai
Laszlo Babai
James Maynard
James Maynard
Maryna Vazovska
Maryna Vazovska
Mamokgethi Phakeng
Mamokgethi Phakeng
Gil Kalai
Gil Kalai

Most invited

This list inventories the mathematicians who were the most invited to speak to an ICM.

Rank Name # Years Nationality
1 Jacques Hadamard 9 1897, 1900, 1904, 1908, 1912, 1920, 1928, 1932, 1950  France
2 Émile Borel 7 1897, 1900, 1904, 1908, 1912, 1928, 1936  France
2 Jules Drach 7 1900, 1912, 1920, 1924, 1928, 1932, 1936  France
4 Elie Cartan 6 1900, 1920, 1924, 1928, 1932, 1936  France
4 Gino Loria 6 1897, 1904, 1908, 1912, 1928, 1932  Italy
4 Vito Volterra 6 1900, 1904, 1908, 1912, 1920, 1928  Italy
7 Henri Fehr 5 1904, 1908, 1912, 1924, 1932   Switzerland
7 Rudolf Fueter 5 1920, 1924, 1928, 1932, 1936   Switzerland
7 Yuri Manin 5 1966, 1970, 1978, 1986, 1990  Russia  Germany
7 Mihailo Petrović 5 1908, 1912, 1924, 1928, 1932  Serbia
7 Cyparissos Stephanos 5 1897, 1900, 1904, 1908, 1912  Greece
7 Carl Størmer 5 1908, 1920, 1924, 1932, 1936  Norway
7 Gheorghe Țițeica 5 1908, 1912, 1924, 1932, 1936  Romania
7 Stanisław Zaremba 5 1908, 1920, 1924, 1932, 1936  Poland

References

  1. ^ Castelvecchi, Davide (7 October 2015). "The biggest mystery in mathematics: Shinichi Mochizuki and the impenetrable proof". Nature. 526 (7572): 178–181. Bibcode:2015Natur.526..178C. doi:10.1038/526178a. PMID 26450038.
  2. ^ Scott, Charlotte Angas (1900). "The International Congress of Mathematicians in Paris" (PDF). Bull. Amer. Math. Soc. 7 (2): 57–79. doi:10.1090/s0002-9904-1900-00768-3.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u Richardson, R. G. D. (1932). "International Congress of Mathematicians, Zurich, 1932". Bull. Amer. Math. Soc. 38 (11): 769–774. doi:10.1090/S0002-9904-1932-05491-X.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u Morse, Marston. "The international Congress in Oslo." Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society 42, no. 11 (1936): 777–781. doi:10.1090/S0002-9904-1936-06421-9
  5. ^ Carl B. Boyer; Uta C. Merzbach (25 January 2011). A History of Mathematics (PDF). John Wiley & Sons. p. 592. ISBN 978-0-470-63056-3.
  6. ^ Cartier, Pierre (2004), "Un pays dont on ne connaîtrait que le nom (Grothendieck et les " motifs ")" (PDF), in Cartier, Pierre; Charraud, Nathalie (eds.), Réel en mathématiques-psychanalyse et mathématiques (in French), Editions Agalma, archived from the original (PDF) on 2013-10-29, English translation: A country of which nothing is known but the name: Grothendieck and "motives" . ((citation)): External link in |postscript= (help)CS1 maint: postscript (link)
  7. ^ Jean-Paul Pier (September 2000). Development of Mathematics 1950-2000. Springer Science & Business Media. p. 437. ISBN 978-3-7643-6280-5.
  8. ^ Thirty-one Invited Address (eight in Abstract) at the International Congress of Mathematicians in Moscow, 1966. American Mathematical Society Translations - Series 2. American Mathematical Society. 1968.
See also