The Juventus team during the 1905 season in which they won their first league title
The Juventus team during the 1905 season in which they won their first league title

Juventus Football Club is an Italian professional association football club based in Turin, Piedmont. The club was founded as Sport-Club Juventus in late 1897 by pupils from the Massimo d'Azeglio Lyceum school in Turin, among them the brothers Eugenio and Enrico Canfari,[1] but were renamed as Foot-Ball Club Juventus two years later.[2] The club joined the Italian Football Championship in 1900. In 1904, the businessman Ajmone-Marsan revived the finances of the football club Juventus, making it also possible to transfer the training field from Piazza d'armi to the more appropriate Velodrome Umberto I. During this period, the team wore a pink and black kit. Juventus first won the league championship in 1905 while playing at their Velodrome Umberto I ground. By this time the club colours had changed to black and white stripes, inspired by English side Notts County.[3]

Juventus is the most successful club in Italian football and one of the most awarded globally.[4][5][6] Overall, Juventus has won 70 official titles on the national and international stage,[a] more than any other Italian club: 36 official league titles, 14 Coppa Italia titles, nine Supercoppa Italiana titles, being the record holder in all these competitions; and, with 11 titles in confederation and inter-confederation competitions (two Intercontinental Cups, two European Champion Clubs' Cup/UEFA Champions Leagues, one European Cup Winners' Cup, three UEFA Cups, one UEFA Intertoto Cup and two UEFA Super Cups), the club ranks sixth in Europe and twelfth in the world with the most trophies won.[7]

Under the first spell of headcoach Giovanni Trapattoni (1976–1986), the Torinese club won thirteen trophies in the ten years before 1986 (including six league titles, two national cup titles and five international titles) and became the first to win all three competitions organised by the UEFA: the European Champions' Cup, Cup Winners' Cup and UEFA Cup.[8][9][10] With successive triumphs in the 1984 European Super Cup and 1985 Intercontinental Cup, the club became the first, and thus far, the first and only in association football history, to have won all possible confederation competitions,[11][12] an achievement that it revalidated with the title won in the 1999 UEFA Intertoto Cup.[13] Under the management of Marcello Lippi (1994–1999 and 2001–2004), the club had its second most successful cycle with five league titles and three international titles, along with a one Coppa Italia title, four Supercoppa Italiana titles and four further European finals, one UEFA Cup final and three Champions League finals (1996–97, 1997–98, 2002–03).[14]

In May 2006, Juventus became one of the five clubs linked to a 2006 Italian football scandal, the result of which saw the club relegated to Serie B for the first time in its history, as well as being stripped of the two league titles won under Fabio Capello in 2005 and 2006.[15] After returning to Serie A in the 2007–08 season, Juventus appointed Claudio Ranieri as manager[16] and finished third and second in the following two years league.[17] After two consecutive 7th-place finishes (its worst placement since 1954–57) and for the first time since the 1991–92 season, excluding the seasons 2006–07 and 2007–08 after the Calciopoli scandal, out of European competitions,[18] newly Juventus chairmen Andrea Agnelli appointed former player Antonio Conte as manager in 2011,[19] the same year the club relocated to the new Juventus Stadium.[20] Conte led Juventus to his first three league titles of the 2010s,[21][22][23] including an unbeaten league title in 2012 and achieved a record 102 points and 33 wins in the 2013–14 season.[24]

Following Conte's resignment,[25] Massimiliano Allegri was appointed as manager[26] and led Juventus to a national double in his first year.[27] In the 2015–16 season, the club won their 5th straight title (and 32nd overall) since last winning five straight between 1930–31 and 1934–35, after climbing from 12th place and taking 73 points of a possible 75.[28] The club also became the first team in Italy's history to complete Serie A and Coppa Italia doubles in back-to-back seasons.[29][30] In the 2016–17 season, the club won their 12th Coppa Italia title, becoming the first team to win three consecutive championships.[31] Juventus also secured their sixth consecutive league title, establishing an all-time record of successive triumphs in the competition.[32][33] Juventus won their 13th Coppa Italia title, and fourth in a row, extending the all-time record of successive Coppa Italia titles.[34] Four days later on 13 May, Juventus secured their seventh consecutive Serie A title, extending the all-time record of successive triumphs in the competition.[35] On 20 April 2019, Juventus secured their eighth consecutive Serie A title,[36] with Allegri departing Juventus at the end of the season. A year later, on 26 July 2020, the club secured a ninth consecutive title under new manager Maurizio Sarri, pushing their unprecedented record to new heights.[37] On 2 May 2021, under new manager Andrea Pirlo, Juventus' run of nine consecutive titles was mathematically ended by Internazionale, who were confirmed as champions.[38]

Key

Winner Runners-up Third place Promotion Relegation Top goalscorer in Serie A

Seasons

The first official national football tournament was organised in 1898 by the Italian Football Federation (Italian: Federazione Italiana del Football FIF, before changing its name in Federazione Italiana Giuoco Calcio FIGC by 1909).[39]

In the following years, the tournament (called Prima Categoria) was structured into regional groups, with the winners of each group participating in a playoff with the eventual winners being declared champions. From 1921 to 1926, Prima Divisione was founded as the first level of the Italian Football Championship. Regarding to the dispute between major clubs and FIGC, Divisione Nazionale was created in the following three years as the new national top league where Northern and Southern teams played in the same championship from 1926 to 1929. In 1929, Divisione Nazionale (two groups of 16 teams each) split into two championships: Divisione Nazionale Serie A (the new Top Division) and Divisione Nazionale Serie B (the new second level of Italian Football).[40][41]

In the current format of Serie A, the Italian Football Championship was revised from having regional and interregional rounds to a single-tier league from the 1929–30 season onward.

Season League1 Coppa
Italia
2
Continental Supercoppa
Italiana
3
Manager(s) Top goalscorer(s)4
Division Pld W D L GF GA Pts Pos
1897–98
1899
1900 Campionato Nazionale di Football/Piemonte 4 2 0 2 5 3 4 2nd
1901 Campionato Italiano di Football 2 1 0 1 7 3 2 3rd
1902 Campionato Italiano di Football/Piemontese 4 2 1 1 10 5 5 2nd
1902–03 Campionato Italiano di Football 5 4 0 1 16 5 8 2nd
1903–04 Prima Categoria 4 2 1 1 7 4 5 2nd
1904–05 Prima Categoria 4 2 2 0 9 3 6 1st Italy Domenico Donna
Italy Luigi Forlano
3
Seconda Categoria 4 4 0 0 5 0 8 1st[42]
1905–06 Prima Categoria 4 2 1 1 5 3 5 2nd
Seconda Categoria 6 3 0 3 7 7 6 3rd
1906–07 Prima Categoria/Piemonte 2 0 0 2 2 6 0 2nd
Seconda Categoria/Piemonte 4 2 0 2 4 3 4 2nd
1907–08 Campionato Italiano di Prima Categoria 2 0 1 1 1 3 1 4th
Campionato Federale di Prima Categoria/Piemonte 4 2 1 1 10 4 5 1st[43]
1908–09 Campionato Federale di Prima Categoria/Piemonte 3 1 0 2 3 3 2 3rd
Campionato Italiano di Prima Categoria 6 4 1 1 10 7 9 1st[44]
1909–10 Prima Categoria 16 8 2 6 29 20 18 3rd
1910–11 Prima Categoria 16 3 4 9 16 29 10 9th
1911–12 Prima Categoria 18 3 3 12 22 37 9 8th
1912–13 Prima Categoria 10 1 1 8 14 35 3 6th
1913–14 Prima Categoria 28 17 4 7 85 42 38 4th
1914–15 Prima Categoria 16 11 1 4 61 28 23 3rd
No competitive football was played between 1915 and 1919 due to the First World War
1919–20 Prima Categoria 22 15 5 2 49 12 35 2nd Italy Pio Ferraris 15
1920–21 Prima Categoria/A 10 4 3 3 27 14 11 4th Italy Pio Ferraris 7
1921–22 Prima Divisione (CCI)/A 22 7 9 6 27 31 22 6th R3 Italy Pio Ferraris 10
1922–23 Prima Divisione/B 22 10 5 7 31 23 25 5th Italy Francesco Blando 12
1923–24 Prima Divisione/A 22 11 4 7 37 27 26 6th Hungary Jenő Károly Italy Pietro Pastore 8
1924–25 Prima Divisione/B 24 12 8 4 38 21 32 3rd Hungary Jenő Károly Italy Federico Munerati 14
1925–26 Prima Divisione 24 19 3 2 80 15 41 1st Hungary Jenő Károly
Hungary József Viola
Austria Ferenc Hirzer 35
1926–27 Divisione Nazionale 28 17 4 7 68 23 38 3rd R32[45] Hungary József Viola
1927–28 Divisione Nazionale 34 16 8 10 60 41 40 3rd Hungary József Viola
1928–29 Divisione Nazionale/B 30 16 9 5 76 25 41 2nd MIT QF Scotland William Aitken
1929–30 Serie A 34 19 7 8 56 31 45 3rd Scotland William Aitken Italy Argentina Raimundo Orsi 15
1930–31 Serie A 34 25 5 4 79 37 55 1st MIT QF Italy Carlo Carcano Italy Argentina Raimundo Orsi 20
1931–32 Serie A 34 24 6 4 89 38 54 1st MIT SF Italy Carlo Carcano Italy Argentina Raimundo Orsi 19
1932–33 Serie A 34 25 4 5 83 23 54 1st MIT SF Italy Carlo Carcano Italy Felice Borel 29
1933–34 Serie A 34 23 7 4 88 31 53 1st MIT SF Italy Carlo Carcano Italy Felice Borel 31
1934–35 Serie A 30 18 8 4 45 22 44 1st MIT SF Italy Carlo Carcano
Italy Carlo Bigatto
Italy Benè Gola
Italy Felice Borel 12
1935–36 Serie A 30 13 9 8 46 33 35 5th QF Italy Virginio Rosetta Italy Guglielmo Gabetto 20
1936–37 Serie A 30 12 11 7 53 31 35 5th R16 Italy Virginio Rosetta Italy Guglielmo Gabetto 18
1937–38 Serie A 30 14 11 5 43 22 39 2nd Champions MIT SF Italy Virginio Rosetta Italy Guglielmo Gabetto 9
1938–39 Serie A 30 8 13 9 28 34 39 8th R16 Italy Virginio Rosetta Italy Guglielmo Gabetto 10
1939–40 Serie A 30 15 6 9 45 40 36 3rd SF Italy Umberto Caligaris Italy Guglielmo Gabetto 12
1940–41 Serie A 30 12 8 10 50 47 32 5th R16 Italy Umberto Caligaris
Italy Federico Munerati
Italy Guglielmo Gabetto 16
1941–42 Serie A 30 12 8 10 47 41 32 6th Champions Italy Giovanni Ferrari
Italy Argentina Luis Monti
Albania Riza Lushta 19
1942–43 Serie A 30 16 5 9 75 55 37 3rd R16 Italy Felice Borel
Italy Argentina Luis Monti
Italy Vittorio Sentimenti 19
No competitive football was played between 1944 and 1945 due to the Second World War
1945–46 Divisione Nazionale 40 22 12 6 83 31 56 2nd Italy Felice Borel Italy Silvio Piola 16
1946–47 Serie A 38 22 9 7 83 38 53 2nd Italy Argentina Renato Cesarini Italy Mario Astorri 17
1947–48 Serie A 40 19 11 10 74 44 49 3rd Italy Argentina Renato Cesarini Italy Giampiero Boniperti 26
1948–49 Serie A 38 18 8 12 64 47 44 4th Scotland Billy Chalmers Denmark John Hansen 15
1949–50 Serie A 38 28 6 4 100 43 62 1st England Jesse Carver Denmark John Hansen 28
1950–51 Serie A 38 23 8 7 103 44 54 3rd CR RU England Jesse Carver
Italy Luigi Bertolini
Denmark Karl Aage Hansen 25
1951–52 Serie A 38 26 8 4 98 34 60 1st LC 3rd England Jesse Carver
Italy Luigi Bertolini
Hungary György Sárosi
Denmark John Hansen 28
1952–53 Serie A 34 18 9 7 73 40 45 2nd Hungary György Sárosi Denmark John Hansen 22
1953–54 Serie A 34 20 10 4 58 34 50 2nd Italy Aldo Olivieri Italy Eduardo Ricagni 17
1954–55 Serie A 34 12 13 9 60 53 37 7th Italy Aldo Olivieri Denmark Helge Bronée 11
1955–56 Serie A 34 8 17 9 32 37 33 12th N/A Italy Sandro Puppo Brazil Nardo 7
1956–57 Serie A 34 11 11 12 54 54 33 9th N/A Italy Sandro Puppo Italy Giorgio Stivanello 11
1957–58 Serie A 34 23 5 6 77 44 51 1st
(10th title)
SF N/A Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Ljubiša Broćić Wales John Charles 28
1958–59 Serie A 34 16 10 8 74 51 42 4th Champions EC R32
AMI Champions[46]
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Ljubiša Broćić
Italy Teobaldo Depetrini
Wales John Charles 19
1959–60 Serie A 34 25 5 4 92 33 55 1st Champions AMI Champions[47] Italy Carlo Parola Italy Argentina Omar Sívori 28
1960–61 Serie A 34 22 5 7 80 42 49 1st SF EC R32 Italy Carlo Parola Italy Argentina Omar Sívori 25
1961–62 Serie A 34 10 9 15 48 56 29 13th SF EC QF
MIT GS
Czech Republic Július Korostelev
Italy Carlo Parola
Sweden Gunnar Gren
Italy Argentina Omar Sívori 13
1962–63 Serie A 34 18 9 7 50 25 45 2nd QF CDA Champions Brazil Paulo Amaral Italy Argentina Omar Sívori 16
1963–64 Serie A 34 14 10 10 49 37 28 5th SF ICFC QF Brazil Paulo Amaral
Italy Eraldo Monzeglio
Italy Argentina Omar Sívori 13
1964–65 Serie A 34 15 11 8 43 24 41 4th Champions ICFC Runners-up Paraguay Heriberto Herrera Italy Giampaolo Menichelli 11
1965–66 Serie A 34 13 16 5 38 23 42 5th SF CWC R1 Paraguay Heriberto Herrera Italy Silvino Bercellino
Italy Giampaolo Menichelli
6
1966–67 Serie A 34 18 13 3 44 19 49 1st SF ICFC QF
CDA Runners-up
Paraguay Heriberto Herrera Italy Giampaolo Menichelli 11
1967–68 Serie A 30 13 10 7 33 29 36 3rd R1 EC SF Paraguay Heriberto Herrera Italy Virginio De Paoli 8
1968–69 Serie A 30 12 11 7 32 24 35 5th QF ICFC R2 Paraguay Heriberto Herrera Italy Pietro Anastasi 15
1969–70 Serie A 30 15 8 7 43 20 38 3rd QF ICFC R2
AIC GS
Argentina Luis Carniglia
Italy Ercole Rabitti
Italy Pietro Anastasi 15
1970–71 Serie A 30 11 13 6 41 30 35 4th GS ICFC Runners-up
TP 3rd
Italy Armando Picchi
Czechoslovakia Čestmír Vycpálek
Italy Roberto Bettega 13
1971–72 Serie A 30 17 9 4 48 24 43 1st R2 UC QF Czechoslovakia Čestmír Vycpálek Italy Pietro Anastasi 11
1972–73 Serie A 30 18 9 3 45 22 45 1st Runners-up EC Runners-up Czechoslovakia Čestmír Vycpálek Brazil Italy José Altafini 9
1973–74 Serie A 30 16 9 5 50 26 41 2nd R2 EC R1
IC Runners-up
Czechoslovakia Čestmír Vycpálek Italy Pietro Anastasi 16
1974–75 Serie A 30 18 7 5 49 19 43 1st R2 UC SF Czechoslovakia Čestmír Vycpálek
Italy Carlo Parola
Italy Pietro Anastasi
Italy Oscar Damiani
9
1975–76 Serie A 30 18 7 5 46 26 43 2nd R1 EC R2 Italy Carlo Parola Italy Roberto Bettega 15
1976–77 Serie A 30 23 5 2 50 20 51 1st R2 UC Champions Italy Giovanni Trapattoni Italy Roberto Bettega 17
1977–78 Serie A 30 15 14 1 46 17 44 1st R2 EC SF Italy Giovanni Trapattoni Italy Roberto Bettega 11
1978–79 Serie A 30 12 13 5 40 23 37 3rd Champions EC R1 Italy Giovanni Trapattoni Italy Roberto Bettega 9
1979–80 Serie A 30 16 6 8 42 25 38 2nd SF CWC SF Italy Giovanni Trapattoni Italy Roberto Bettega 16
1980–81 Serie A 30 17 10 3 46 15 44 1st SF UC R2 Italy Giovanni Trapattoni Republic of Ireland Liam Brady 8
1981–82 Serie A 30 19 8 3 48 14 46 1st
(20th title)
GS EC R2 Italy Giovanni Trapattoni Italy Pietro Paolo Virdis 9
1982–83 Serie A 30 15 9 6 49 26 39 2nd Champions EC Runners-up Italy Giovanni Trapattoni France Michel Platini 16
1983–84 Serie A 30 17 9 4 57 29 43 1st R16 CWC Champions Italy Giovanni Trapattoni France Michel Platini 20
1984–85 Serie A 30 11 14 5 48 33 36 6th QF EC Champions
ESC Champions
Italy Giovanni Trapattoni France Michel Platini 18
1985–86 Serie A 30 18 9 3 43 17 45 1st R16 EC QF
IC Champions
Italy Giovanni Trapattoni France Michel Platini 12
1986–87 Serie A 30 14 11 5 42 27 39 2nd QF EC R2 Italy Rino Marchesi Italy Aldo Serena 10
1987–88 Serie A 30 11 9 10 35 30 31 6th SF UC R2 * Italy Rino Marchesi Wales Ian Rush 7
1988–89 Serie A 34 15 13 6 51 36 43 4th R2 UC QF N/A Italy Dino Zoff Portugal Rui Barros 12
1989–90 Serie A 34 15 14 5 56 36 44 4th Champions UC Champions N/A Italy Dino Zoff Italy Salvatore Schillaci 15
1990–91 Serie A 34 13 11 10 45 32 37 7th QF CWC SF Runners-up Italy Luigi Maifredi Italy Roberto Baggio 14
1991–92 Serie A 34 18 12 4 45 22 48 2nd Runners-up N/A N/A Italy Giovanni Trapattoni Italy Roberto Baggio 18
1992–93 Serie A 34 15 9 10 59 47 39 4th SF UC Champions N/A Italy Giovanni Trapattoni Italy Roberto Baggio 21
1993–94 Serie A 34 17 13 4 58 25 47 2nd R2 UC QF N/A Italy Giovanni Trapattoni Italy Roberto Baggio 17
1994–95 Serie A 34 23 4 7 59 32 73 1st Champions UC Runners-up N/A Italy Marcello Lippi Italy Gianluca Vialli 17
1995–96 Serie A 34 19 8 7 58 35 65 2nd R3 CL Champions Champions Italy Marcello Lippi Italy Fabrizio Ravanelli 12
1996–97 Serie A 34 17 14 3 51 24 65 1st QF CL Runners-up
USC Champions
IC Champions
N/A Italy Marcello Lippi Italy Alessandro Del Piero
Italy Michele Padovano
Italy Christian Vieri
8
1997–98 Serie A 34 21 11 2 67 28 74 1st SF CL Runners-up Champions Italy Marcello Lippi Italy Alessandro Del Piero 21
1998–99 Serie A 34 15 9 10 42 36 54 7th QF CL SF Runners-up Italy Marcello Lippi
Italy Carlo Ancelotti
Italy Filippo Inzaghi 13
1999–2000 Serie A 34 21 8 5 46 20 71 2nd QF UIC Champions
UC R4
N/A Italy Carlo Ancelotti Italy Filippo Inzaghi 15
2000–01 Serie A 34 21 10 3 61 27 73 2nd R16 CL GS N/A Italy Carlo Ancelotti France David Trezeguet 14
2001–02 Serie A 34 20 11 3 64 23 71 1st Runners-up CL GS2 N/A Italy Marcello Lippi France David Trezeguet 24
2002–03 Serie A 34 21 9 4 64 29 72 1st QF CL Runners-up Champions Italy Marcello Lippi Italy Alessandro Del Piero 16
2003–04 Serie A 34 21 6 7 67 42 69 3rd Runners-up CL R16 Champions Italy Marcello Lippi France David Trezeguet 16
2004–05 Serie A 38 26 8 4 67 27 86 1st[48] R16 CL QF N/A Italy Fabio Capello Sweden Zlatan Ibrahimović 16
2005–06 Serie A 38 27 10 1 71 24 91 20th[49] QF CL QF Runners-up Italy Fabio Capello France David Trezeguet 23
2006–07 Serie B 42 28 10 4 83 30 85[50] 1st R3 N/A N/A France Didier Deschamps
Italy Giancarlo Corradini
Italy Alessandro Del Piero 20
2007–08 Serie A 38 20 12 6 72 37 72 3rd QF N/A N/A Italy Claudio Ranieri Italy Alessandro Del Piero 21
2008–09 Serie A 38 21 11 6 69 37 74 2nd SF CL R16 N/A Italy Claudio Ranieri
Italy Ciro Ferrara
Italy Alessandro Del Piero 13
2009–10 Serie A 38 16 7 15 55 56 55 7th QF CL GS
EL R16
N/A Italy Ciro Ferrara
Italy Alberto Zaccheroni
Italy Alessandro Del Piero 9
2010–11 Serie A 38 15 13 10 57 47 58 7th QF EL GS N/A Italy Luigi Delneri Italy Alessandro Matri
Italy Fabio Quagliarella
9
2011–12 Serie A 38 23 15 0 68 20 84 1st Runners-up N/A N/A Italy Antonio Conte Italy Alessandro Matri 10
2012–13 Serie A 38 27 6 5 71 24 87 1st SF CL QF Champions Italy Antonio Conte Chile Arturo Vidal
Montenegro Mirko Vučinić
10
2013–14 Serie A 38 33 3 2 80 23 102 1st
(30th title)5
QF CL GS
EL SF
Champions Italy Antonio Conte Argentina Carlos Tevez 19
2014–15 Serie A 38 26 9 3 72 24 87 1st Champions
(10th title)6
CL Runners-up Runners-up Italy Massimiliano Allegri Argentina Carlos Tevez 20
2015–16 Serie A 38 29 4 5 75 20 91 1st Champions CL R16 Champions Italy Massimiliano Allegri Argentina Paulo Dybala 19
2016–17 Serie A 38 29 4 5 77 27 91 1st Champions CL Runners-up Runners-up Italy Massimiliano Allegri Argentina Gonzalo Higuaín 24
2017–18 Serie A 38 30 5 3 86 24 95 1st Champions CL QF Runners-up Italy Massimiliano Allegri Argentina Paulo Dybala 22
2018–19 Serie A 38 28 6 4 70 30 90 1st QF CL QF Champions Italy Massimiliano Allegri Portugal Cristiano Ronaldo 21
2019–20 Serie A 38 26 5 7 76 43 83 1st Runners-up CL R16 Runners-up Italy Maurizio Sarri Portugal Cristiano Ronaldo 31
2020–21 Serie A 38 23 9 6 77 38 78 4th Champions CL R16 Champions Italy Andrea Pirlo Portugal Cristiano Ronaldo 29

As of 23 May 2021

Doubles and Trebles

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Including exclusively the official titles won during its participation in the top flight of Italian football.
  2. ^ Also called Tripletta Tricolore, Italian Football Federation (FIGC) regards the national supercup legally as a seasonal competition in its own official matches calendar, cf. "Juve, niente sfilata scudetto in pullman" (in Italian). Sport Mediaset. 10 May 2016. Retrieved 10 November 2018.

References

  1. ^ "Storia della Juventus Football Club". magicajuventus.com (in Italian). Archived from the original on 21 January 2008. Retrieved 8 July 2007.
  2. ^ "Juventus Football Club: The History". Juventus Football Club S.p.A. official website. Archived from the original on 29 July 2008. Retrieved 9 August 2008.
  3. ^ Modena, Panini Edizioni (2005). Almanacco Illustrato del Calcio – La Storia 1898–2004.
  4. ^ "Juventus building bridges in Serie B". Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 14 April 2016.
  5. ^ "Old Lady sits pretty". Union des Associations Européennes de Football. Retrieved 26 June 2003.
  6. ^ "Europe's club of the Century". International Federation of Football History & Statistics. Archived from the original on 24 May 2012. Retrieved 14 April 2016.
  7. ^ Sixth most successful European club for confederation and FIFA competitions won with 11 titles. Sixth most successful club in Europe for confederation club competition titles won (11), cf. "Confermato: I più titolati al mondo!" (in Italian). A.C. Milan S.p.A. official website. 30 May 2013. Retrieved 19 June 2013.
  8. ^ "History of the UEFA Cup". Union des Associations Européennes de Football. Retrieved 5 April 2008.
  9. ^ "Giovanni Trapattoni". Union des Associations Européennes de Football. 31 May 2010. Retrieved 27 December 2010.
  10. ^ "Un dilema histórico" (PDF) (in Spanish). El Mundo Deportivo. 23 September 2003. Retrieved 23 September 2008.
  11. ^ "1985: Juventus end European drought". Union des Associations Européennes de Football. 8 December 1985. Archived from the original on December 8, 2013. Retrieved 26 February 2013.
  12. ^ (The Technician (UEFA) 2010:5)
  13. ^ Paul Saffer (10 April 2016). "Paris aim to join multiple trophy winners". Union des Associations Européennes de Football.
  14. ^ "Greatest Managers, No. 15: Lippi". ESPN. Retrieved 7 February 2015.
  15. ^ "Italian trio relegated to Serie B". BBC. 14 April 2016. Retrieved 14 July 2006.
  16. ^ "Ranieri appointed Juventus coach". BBC News. 14 April 2016. Retrieved 4 June 2007.
  17. ^ "Via Ranieri, ecco Ferrara" (in Italian). Union des Associations Européennes de Football. Retrieved 19 May 2009.
  18. ^ "Ferrara handed Juventus reins". Union des Associations Européennes de Football. Retrieved 5 June 2009.
  19. ^ "Conte replaces Del Neri at Juventus". ESPN Soccernet. 31 May 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2016.
  20. ^ "Juventus open doors to new home with Notts County as starstruck guests". The Guardian. 1 January 2016.
  21. ^ "Champions Juventus finish season unbeaten". UEFA.com. 13 May 2012. Retrieved 16 May 2016.
  22. ^ "Juventus 3–0 Cagliari". BBC. 18 May 2014. Retrieved 19 May 2014.
  23. ^ "Juventus complete Serie A title hat-trick as Roma slump at Catania". The Guardian. 5 May 2014. Retrieved 19 May 2014.
  24. ^ "2013-14 Serie A review". Football Italia. Retrieved 16 May 2016.
  25. ^ "Antonio Conte quits as coach of Italian champions". BBC Sport. 15 July 2014. Retrieved 16 July 2014.
  26. ^ "Juventus hire former AC Milan boss Massimiliano Allegri". BBC Sport. 16 July 2014. Retrieved 16 July 2014.
  27. ^ Carlo Campo (20 May 2015). "Juventus win record 10th Coppa Italia title". thescore.com. Retrieved 4 April 2016.
  28. ^ "Official: Juventus retain Scudetto!". Football Italia. 25 April 2016. Retrieved 25 April 2016.
  29. ^ "Juventus claim back-to-back doubles after 11th Coppa Italia success". eurosport.com. 21 May 2016. Retrieved 21 May 2016.
  30. ^ "Milan 0-1 Juventus (AET): Morata grabs extra-time winner to seal another double". goal.com. 21 May 2016. Retrieved 21 May 2016.
  31. ^ "JUVENTUS WINS HISTORIC THIRD STRAIGHT COPPA ITALIA". beinsports.com. 17 May 2017. Retrieved 17 May 2017.
  32. ^ "Juventus Clinch Sixth Consecutive Serie A Title Against Crotone". espnfc.us. 21 May 2017. Retrieved 21 May 2017.
  33. ^ "Juventus, Champions of Italy for the sixth time in a row". juventus.com. 21 May 2017.
  34. ^ "Coppa: Force Four Juve flatten Milan". Football Italia. 9 May 2018.
  35. ^ "Juventus Seven-Up". Football Italia. 13 May 2018.
  36. ^ "Juventus fightback to secure Scudetto". Football Italia. 20 April 2019.
  37. ^ "Juventus claim ninth title in a row as Ronaldo sets up win over Sampdoria". The Guardian. 26 July 2020. Retrieved 26 July 2020.
  38. ^ "Inter Milan: Italian giants win first Serie A for 11 years". BBC Sport. 2 May 2021. Retrieved 2 May 2021.
  39. ^ "FIGC History – 1898". FIGC. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  40. ^ Annuario 1931, p. 40. "Il campionato di Divisione Nazionale è diviso in due serie: A e B" (The Championship of Divisione Nazionale is divided into two Serie: A and B").
  41. ^ John Foot. Calcio – a history of Italian Football. Fourth Estate. ISBN 0007175744.
  42. ^ Not recognized as an official title.
  43. ^ Not recognized as an official title.
  44. ^ Not recognized as an official title.
  45. ^ The tournament was interrupted in the round of 32 due to the lack of available dates for the matches.
  46. ^ Contributed to the victory representing Italy.
  47. ^ Contributed to the victory representing Italy.
  48. ^ Juventus had title stripped due to the Calciopoli scandal.
  49. ^ Juventus' title was stripped and awarded to Inter Milan due to the Calciopoli scandal. Juventus was relegated to Serie B.
  50. ^ Juventus started the season with a penalization of 17 points (initially 30), which was later reduced to 9 on appeal.

Bibliography

Other publications

  • "Football Philosophers" (PDF). The Technician. Union des Associations Européennes de Football (UEFA). 46. May 2010.