Ray Schalk, the leader in all-time double plays by a catcher

In baseball statistics, a double play (denoted as DP) is the act of making two outs during the same continuous play. One double play is recorded for every defensive player who participates in the play, regardless of how many of the outs in which they were directly involved, and is counted in addition to whatever putouts and assists might also apply. Double plays can occur any time there is at least one baserunner and fewer than two outs.[1] The catcher is a defensive position for a baseball or softball player. When a batter takes his/her turn to hit, the catcher crouches behind home plate, in front of the (home) umpire, and receives the ball from the pitcher.[2] In addition to these primary duties, the catcher is also called upon to master many other skills to field the position well. The role of the catcher is similar to that of the wicket-keeper in cricket. In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the catcher is assigned the number 2.

Double Plays Turned as C

Catchers typically record double plays by throwing out a runner attempting to steal a base immediately after the batter has struck out, by tagging out a runner attempting to score a run after receiving a throw from an outfielder on an attempted sacrifice fly, by stepping on home plate to force out a runner with the bases loaded and then throwing out another runner (often the batter trying to reach first base), or by tagging out a runner attempting to score after an out has been recorded at another base. Double plays are also occasionally recorded when a rundown play is involved, almost always as the second out. On August 2, 1985, Carlton Fisk of the Chicago White Sox recorded a double play by tagging out two New York Yankees moments apart at home plate when both tried to score on a double.[3] The feat was duplicated by Paul Lo Duca of the New York Mets in Game 1 of the 2006 National League Division Series against the Los Angeles Dodgers.[4]

Many of the career leaders were active during baseball's dead-ball era when runners made more aggressive attempts to advance around the bases in risky situations; 13 of the top 18 single-season totals, and 28 of the top 37, were recorded before 1928.[5] Ray Schalk holds the record for the most career double plays by a catcher with 222.[6] Steve O'Neill is second with 198;[7] only seven other catchers have recorded 150 career double plays.

Key

Rank Rank among leaders in career double plays. A blank field indicates a tie.
Player (2024 DPs) Recorded double plays in 2024
MLB Total career double plays as a catcher in Major League Baseball
* Denotes elected to National Baseball Hall of Fame
Bold Denotes active player[a]

List

J. T. Realmuto, the active leader in double plays by a catcher and 104th all-time.
Steve O'Neill had 36 double plays in 1916, the only season of 30 or more in major league history.
Yogi Berra led the American League in double plays a record six times.
Gabby Hartnett holds the National League record.
Charlie Bennett was the first catcher to record 100 double plays.
Tom Haller set the National League record of 23 double plays in 1968.
Rank Player (2024 DPs) Double plays as a catcher Other leagues, notes
MLB American League National League
1 Ray Schalk* 222 222 0 Held the American League single-season record, 1913-1914 (tie)
2 Steve O'Neill 198 198 0 Held major league record, 1920-1923; held American League record, 1917-1923; holds the single-season record of 36 (set in 1916)
3 Yogi Berra* 175 175 0
4 Gabby Hartnett* 163 0 163
5 Iván Rodríguez* 158 136 22
6 Tony Peña 156 64 92
7 Bob Boone 154 87 67
Wally Schang 154 154 0
9 Jimmie Wilson 153 0 153 Held National League record, 1935-1938
10 Gary Carter* 149 0 149
11 Jason Kendall 148 30 118
12 Carlton Fisk* 147 147 0
13 Jim Sundberg 145 142 3
14 Deacon McGuire 143 32 90 Includes 21 in American Association; held major league record, 1904-1920
15 Rollie Hemsley 141 97 44
Ivey Wingo 141 0 141 Held National League record, 1924-1935
17 Rick Ferrell* 139 139 0
Muddy Ruel 139 139 0
Luke Sewell 139 139 0
20 Bill Dickey* 137 137 0
Al López* 137 1 136
Yadier Molina 137 0 137
23 Jim Hegan 136 130 6
24 Charles Zimmer 135 0 128 Includes 7 in American Association; held major league record, 1900-1904; held National League record, 1901-1924; held the single-season record, 1894-1897
25 Lance Parrish 133 117 16
26 Brad Ausmus 130 17 113
Benito Santiago 130 13 117
28 Bill Killefer 129 18 111
29 Johnny Bench* 127 0 127
Johnny Kling 127 0 127 Held the single-season record, 1902-1909 (tie), 1912-1914; held the National League single-season record, 1912-1922
31 Red Dooin 122 0 122 Held the single-season record, 1908-1909 (tie)
32 Del Crandall 116 2 114
33 Charlie Bennett 114 0 114 Held major league record, 1887-1900
34 George Gibson 112 0 112
Heinie Peitz 112 0 112
36 Rick Dempsey 111 100 11
Wilbert Robinson* 111 8 46 Includes 57 in American Association
John Roseboro 111 22 89
Billy Sullivan 111 98 13 Held the American League single-season record, 1901-1907
40 Frank Snyder 108 0 108
41 Charles Johnson 107 21 86
Ernie Lombardi* 107 0 107
Cy Perkins 107 107 0
Hank Severeid 107 103 4
45 Bill Bergen 106 0 106 Held the single-season record, 1909-1912
Frankie Hayes 106 106 0
47 Frank Bowerman 105 0 105
Johnny Edwards 105 0 105
Larry McLean 105 0 105 Held the single-season record, 1910-1912 (tie)
Oscar Stanage 105 105 0
51 Mickey Cochrane* 104 104 0
Darrell Porter 104 76 28
Ted Simmons* 104 16 88
54 Lou Criger 102 78 24
Duke Farrell 102 7 78 Includes 12 in Players' League, 5 in American Association
56 Sherm Lollar 101 101 0
Bob O'Farrell 101 0 101 Held the National League single-season record, 1922-1968
A. J. Pierzynski 101 82 19
59 Malachi Kittridge 100 15 85
Gus Mancuso 100 0 100
Jack Warner 100 21 79 Held the single-season record, 1897-1909
62 Eddie Ainsmith 99 79 20
Chief Meyers 99 0 99
64 Bill Freehan 98 98 0
65 Spud Davis 97 0 97
Mike Scioscia 97 0 97
67 Roger Bresnahan* 96 3 93
68 Jack Clements 94 0 94
69 Hank Gowdy 93 0 93
Ramón Hernández 93 66 27
Mickey Owen 93 4 89
72 Mike González 92 0 92
Terry Kennedy 92 14 78
Buddy Rosar 92 92 0
75 Mike Piazza* 88 0 88
Butch Wynegar 88 88 0
77 Elston Howard 87 87 0 Negro League totals unavailable
Birdie Tebbetts 87 87 0
79 Roy Campanella* 86 0 82 Includes 4 in Negro National League (second) (incomplete)
Tom Haller 86 1 85 Holds the National League single-season record of 23 (set in 1968)
Otto Miller 86 0 86
Jocko Milligan 86 0 15 Includes 58 in American Association, 13 in the Players' League
83 Mike Matheny 85 22 63
Walter Schmidt 85 0 85
85 Brian McCann 84 18 66
Joe Sugden 84 36 48
87 Bill Rariden 83 0 51 Includes 32 in Federal League
Zack Taylor 83 0 83
Sammy White 83 79 4
90 Doc Bushong 82 0 41 Includes 40 in American Association, 1 in National Association; held major league record, 1886-1887; held the single-season record, 1886-1887
Kirt Manwaring 82 0 82
Thurman Munson 82 82 0
Wes Westrum 82 0 82
94 John Bateman 81 0 81
Jorge Posada 81 81 0
96 Walker Cooper 80 0 80
Andy Seminick 80 0 80
98 Clay Dalrymple 79 3 76
99 Henry Blanco 78 11 67
Buck Ewing* 78 0 71 Includes 7 in Players' League
Russell Martin 78 27 51

Other Hall of Famers

Player Double plays as a catcher Other leagues, notes
MLB American League National League
Connie Mack* 71 0 58 Includes 13 in Players' League
King Kelly* 57 0 44 Includes 11 in American Association, 2 in Players' League
Joe Torre* 57 0 57
Deacon White* 40 0 17 Includes 23 in National Association
Joe Mauer* 39 39 0
Josh Gibson* 35 0 0 Includes 35 in Negro National League (second) (incomplete)
Biz Mackey* 35 0 0 Includes 13 in Negro National League (first), 11 in Eastern Colored League,
7 in Negro National League (second), 4 in American Negro League (incomplete)
Craig Biggio* 20 0 20
Jim O'Rourke* 16 0 13 Includes 3 in National Association
Jimmie Foxx* 7 7 0
Louis Santop* 1 0 0 Includes 1 in Eastern Colored League (incomplete)

Notes

  1. ^ A player is considered inactive if he has announced his retirement or has not played for a full season.

References

  1. ^ "Official Baseball Rules (2022 Edition): Rule 9.11" (PDF). Major League Baseball. Retrieved 21 Dec 2022.
  2. ^ "Official Baseball Rules (2022 Edition): Definition of Terms" (PDF). Major League Baseball. Retrieved 21 Dec 2022.
  3. ^ "Cut4: That time Carlton Fisk tagged two guys out at the plate on the same play". Major League Baseball. 2 August 2015. Retrieved December 21, 2022.
  4. ^ "2006 National League Division Series (NLDS) Game 1". Baseball Reference. Retrieved December 21, 2022.
  5. ^ "Single-Season Leaders & Records for Double Plays Turned as C". Baseball Reference. Retrieved December 21, 2022.
  6. ^ "Ray Schalk Career Stats". Baseball Reference. Retrieved December 6, 2022.
  7. ^ "Steve O'Neill Career Stats". Baseball Reference. Retrieved December 6, 2022.