Eddie Collins, the all-time leader in games played as a second baseman

Games played (most often abbreviated as G or GP) is a statistic used in team sports to indicate the total number of games in which a player has participated (in any capacity); the statistic is generally applied irrespective of whatever portion of the game is contested. In baseball, the statistic applies also to players who, prior to a game, are included on a starting lineup card or are announced as ex ante substitutes, whether or not they play;[1] however, in Major League Baseball, the application of this statistic does not extend to consecutive games played streaks. A starting pitcher, then, may be credited with a game played even if he is not credited with a game started or an inning pitched. In baseball and softball, the second baseman is a fielding position in the infield, commonly stationed between second and first base. The second baseman often possesses quick hands and feet, needs the ability to get rid of the ball quickly, and must be able to make the pivot on a double play. In addition, second basemen are almost always right-handed. Only four left-handed throwing players have appeared as second basemen in the major leagues since 1950; one of the four, Gonzalo Márquez, was listed as the second baseman in the starting lineup for two games in 1973, batting in the first inning, but was replaced before his team took the field on defense, and none of the other three players lasted even a complete inning at the position.[2] In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the second baseman is assigned the number 4.

The second baseman is frequently the smallest player on the team, and the ability of such smaller players to absorb the impact of play has contributed to many long careers at the position throughout major league history; three-quarters of the second basemen elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame have been under 6' tall. Eddie Collins, the first major league player to appear in 2,500 games at a single position, is the all-time leader with 2,650 career games as a second baseman.[3][4][5] Joe Morgan[6] (2,527), Roberto Alomar[7] (2,320), Lou Whitaker[8] (2,308), Nellie Fox[9] (2,295), Charlie Gehringer[10] (2,206), Robinson Canó[11] (2,165), Willie Randolph[12] (2,152), Frank White[13] (2,151), Bid McPhee[14] (2,129), Bill Mazeroski[15] (2,094), Nap Lajoie[16] (2,035), and Jeff Kent[17] (2,034) are the only other second baseman to play over 2,000 games at the position.

Key

Rank Rank amongst leaders in career games played. A blank field indicates a tie.
Player (2024 Gs) Number of games played during the 2024 Major League Baseball season
MLB Total career games played as a second baseman in Major League Baseball
* Denotes elected to National Baseball Hall of Fame
Bold Denotes active player[a]

List

José Altuve, the active leader and 28th all-time in games played as a second baseman
Joe Morgan holds the National League record.
Nellie Fox led the American League in games at second base a record eight consecutive years.
Bid McPhee held the major league record for 32 years.
Johnny Evers held the National League record for 22 years.
Fred Pfeffer held the National League record for 17 years.
Rank Player (2024 Gs) Games as second baseman Other leagues, notes
MLB American League National League
1 Eddie Collins* 2,650 2,650 0
2 Joe Morgan* 2,527 100 2,427
3 Roberto Alomar* 2,320 1,636 684
4 Lou Whitaker 2,308 2,308 0
5 Nellie Fox* 2,295 2,179 116
6 Charlie Gehringer* 2,206 2,206 0
7 Robinson Canó 2,178 2,025 153
8 Willie Randolph 2,152 1,893 259
9 Frank White 2,151 2,151 0
10 Bid McPhee* 2,129 0 1,218 Includes 911 in American Association; held major league record, 1891-1923
11 Bill Mazeroski* 2,094 0 2,094 Held National League record, 1968-1980
12 Nap Lajoie* 2,035 1,720 315 Held American League record, 1911-1920
13 Jeff Kent 2,034 26 2,008
14 Ryne Sandberg* 1,995 0 1,995
15 Craig Biggio* 1,989 0 1,989
16 Bobby Doerr* 1,852 1,852 0
17 Ray Durham 1,843 1,135 708
18 Red Schoendienst* 1,834 0 1,834 Held National League record, 1961-1968
19 Brandon Phillips 1,831 157 1,674
20 Ian Kinsler 1,828 1,756 72
21 Billy Herman* 1,813 0 1,813 Held National League record, 1946-1962
22 Bobby Grich 1,765 1,765 0
23 Bret Boone 1,763 809 954
24 Frankie Frisch* 1,762 0 1,762 Held National League record, 1936-1946
25 Chase Utley 1,743 0 1,743
26 Johnny Evers* 1,735 1 1,734 Held National League record, 1914-1936
27 Larry Doyle 1,728 0 1,728
28 José Altuve (87) 1,705 1,358 347
29 Del Pratt 1,688 1,688 0
30 Luis Castillo 1,683 227 1,456
31 Steve Sax 1,679 609 1,070
32 Kid Gleason 1,585 254 1,331
33 Rogers Hornsby* 1,561 19 1,542
34 Julián Javier 1,552 0 1,552
35 Fred Pfeffer 1,538 0 1,414 Includes 124 in Players' League; held National League record, 1891-1908
36 Miller Huggins* 1,530 0 1,530
37 Joe Gordon* 1,519 1,519 0
38 Frank Bolling 1,518 779 739
Manny Trillo 1,518 124 1,394
40 Tony Taylor 1,498 190 1,308
41 Dustin Pedroia 1,492 1,492 0
42 George Cutshaw 1,486 175 1,311
43 Claude Ritchey 1,479 0 1,479 Held National League record, 1908-1914
44 Tony Lazzeri* 1,456 1,441 15
45 Cupid Childs 1,455 0 1,330 Includes 125 in American Association
46 Hughie Critz 1,453 0 1,453
47 Félix Millán 1,450 0 1,450
48 Jim Gantner 1,449 1,449 0
49 Cookie Rojas 1,446 789 657
50 Davey Lopes 1,418 265 1,153
51 Tom Herr 1,416 73 1,343
52 Delino DeShields 1,392 189 1,203
53 Chuck Knoblauch 1,381 1,381 0
54 Lou Bierbauer 1,366 0 723 Includes 510 in American Association, 133 in Players' League
55 Mark Ellis 1,364 1,021 343
56 Bill Doran 1,359 17 1,342
57 Adam Kennedy 1,347 1,053 294
58 Buddy Myer 1,340 1,340 0
59 Harold Reynolds 1,339 1,339 0
Bobby Richardson 1,339 1,339 0
61 Glenn Hubbard 1,332 152 1,180
62 Dave Cash 1,330 0 1,330
63 Bobby Lowe 1,316 163 1,153
Ski Melillo 1,316 1,316 0
65 Johnny Temple 1,312 277 1,035
66 Don Blasingame 1,310 371 939
67 Joe Quinn 1,307 66 1,108 Includes 133 in Players' League
68 Brian Roberts 1,304 1,304 0
69 Eric Young 1,295 21 1,274
70 Ted Sizemore 1,288 34 1,254
71 Dan Uggla 1,283 0 1,283
72 Orlando Hudson 1,279 588 691
Robby Thompson 1,279 0 1,279
74 Johnny Ray 1,277 363 914
75 Tito Fuentes 1,275 164 1,111
76 Ron Hunt 1,260 0 1,260
77 Bucky Harris* 1,253 1,253 0
78 Mickey Morandini 1,245 35 1,210
79 Glenn Beckert 1,242 0 1,242
80 Otto Knabe 1,239 0 1,001 Includes 238 in Federal League
81 Max Bishop 1,230 1,230 0
82 Aaron Hill 1,210 750 460
83 Tony Cuccinello 1,205 6 1,199
Bill Wambsganss 1,205 1,205 0
85 Davey Johnson 1,198 947 251
86 Mark McLemore 1,197 1,178 19
87 Ronnie Belliard 1,190 383 807
Juan Samuel 1,190 30 1,160
89 Howie Kendrick 1,183 967 216
90 Jerry Priddy 1,179 1,179 0
91 Jimmy Williams 1,176 1,176 0 Held American League record, 1908-1911
92 Damion Easley 1,172 989 183
93 Ron Oester 1,171 0 1,171
94 Bobby Ávila 1,168 1,117 51
95 Jim Gilliam 1,166 0 1,046 Includes 120 in Negro National League (second) (incomplete)
96 Dick Green 1,158 1,158 0
97 Sandy Alomar 1,156 1,114 42
98 Eddie Stanky 1,152 0 1,152
99 Cub Stricker 1,145 0 276 Includes 760 in American Association, 109 in Players' League
100 Bill Hallman 1,139 0 984 Includes 141 in American Association, 14 in Players' League

Other Hall of Famers

Player Games as second baseman Other leagues, notes
MLB American League National League
Rod Carew* 1,130 1,130 0
Jackie Robinson* 748 0 748
Rabbit Maranville* 513 0 513
John Montgomery Ward* 493 0 493
Paul Molitor* 400 400 0
John Henry Lloyd* 223 0 0 Includes 223 in Eastern Colored League (incomplete)
George Kelly* 145 0 145
Ed Delahanty* 131 0 111 Includes 20 in Players' League
George Davis* 113 98 15
Roger Connor* 68 0 68
Ray Dandridge* 54 0 0 Includes 54 in Negro National League (second) (incomplete)
Martín Dihigo* 45 0 0 Includes 28 in Eastern Colored League, 12 in American Negro League,
5 in Negro National League (second) (incomplete)
Joe Cronin* 35 1 34
Frank Grant* 0 0 0 Unavailable pre-Negro league figures
Adrián Beltré* 1 1 0

Notes

  1. ^ A player is considered inactive if he has announced his retirement or not played for a full season.

References

  1. ^ Section 20 of the official scorer guidelines
  2. ^ "From 1950 to 2013, Throws LH, Played: 2B". Baseball-Reference. Retrieved September 23, 2019.
  3. ^ "Eddie Collins Career Stats". Baseball Reference. Retrieved September 23, 2019.
  4. ^ "Eddie Collins Hall of Fame Profile". National Baseball Hall of Fame. Retrieved September 23, 2019.
  5. ^ Holmes, Dan (September 18, 2017). "Eddie Collins was the greatest second baseman of the Deadball Era". Baseball Egg. Retrieved September 23, 2019.
  6. ^ "Joe Morgan Career Stats". Baseball Reference. Retrieved September 23, 2019.
  7. ^ "Roberto Alomar Career Stats". Baseball Reference. Retrieved September 23, 2019.
  8. ^ "Lou Whitaker Career Stats". Baseball Reference. Retrieved September 23, 2019.
  9. ^ "Nellie Fox Career Stats". Baseball Reference. Retrieved September 23, 2019.
  10. ^ "Charlie Gehringer Career Stats". Baseball Reference. Retrieved September 23, 2019.
  11. ^ "Robinson Canó Career Stats". Baseball Reference. Retrieved September 23, 2019.
  12. ^ "Willie Randolph Career Stats". Baseball Reference. Retrieved September 23, 2019.
  13. ^ "Frank White Career Stats". Baseball Reference. Retrieved September 23, 2019.
  14. ^ "Bid McPhee Career Stats". Baseball Reference. Retrieved September 23, 2019.
  15. ^ "Bill Mazeroski Career Stats". Baseball Reference. Retrieved September 23, 2019.
  16. ^ "Nap Lajoie Career Stats". Baseball Reference. Retrieved September 23, 2019.
  17. ^ "Jeff Kent Career Stats". Baseball Reference. Retrieved September 23, 2019.