Rabbit Maranville, the all-time leader in putouts by a shortstop

In baseball statistics, a putout (denoted by PO or fly out when appropriate) is given to a defensive player who records an out by tagging a runner with the ball when he is not touching a base, catching a batted or thrown ball and tagging a base to put out a batter or runner (a force out), catching a thrown ball and tagging a base to record an out on an appeal play, catching a third strike (a strikeout), catching a batted ball on the fly (a flyout), or being positioned closest to a runner called out for interference. Shortstop, abbreviated SS, is a baseball or softball fielding position in the infield, commonly stationed between second and third base, which is considered to be among the most demanding defensive positions. The position is mostly filled by defensive specialists, so shortstops are generally relatively poor batters who typically hit lower in the batting order. In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the shortstop is assigned the number 6.

Putouts are most commonly recorded by shortstops by stepping on second base after receiving a throw from the first baseman, second baseman, or pitcher to force out a runner on a ground out, often beginning a double play; a shortstop generally benefits in this respect from playing alongside an excellent second baseman with great range and quickness. Other ways in which shortstops often record a putout include catching a pop-up or line drive, fielding a ground ball close enough to second base that they can step on the bag for a force out before the runner advances from first base, tagging a runner after a throw from the catcher or pitcher on a stolen base attempt or a pickoff play, receiving a throw from an outfielder to tag out a runner trying to stretch a single into a double, receiving a throw to retire a runner who fails to tag up on a fly ball out, receiving a throw to force out a runner on a bunt (possibly a sacrifice hit attempt), and tagging a runner stranded between bases in a rundown play. Sometimes a shortstop will record a putout while covering third base if the third baseman is charging toward the plate on an expected bunt. Occasionally, a shortstop can record two putouts on a single play; with a runner taking a lead off second base and less than two out, the shortstop can catch a line drive near the base, then step on the bag before the runner can return, completing a double play; alternately, if a runner on first base breaks for second base when the ball is hit, the shortstop can catch a line drive and tag the runner before they can stop and return to first. On eight occasions in major league history, a shortstop has recorded three putouts on a single play for an unassisted triple play, always by catching a line drive, then stepping on second base and tagging the runner advancing from first base.

As strikeout totals have risen in baseball, the frequency of other defensive outs including ground outs has declined; as a result, putout totals for second basemen have likewise declined. The top five career leaders all began their careers prior to 1916, and only four of the top 16 were active after 1950, and only two of them after 1973. Through 2022, only six of the top 40 single-season totals have been recorded since 1922, and none of the top 85 since 1949; none of the top 181 have been recorded since 1964, and only three of the top 485 have been recorded since 1992. Rabbit Maranville is the all-time leader in career putouts as a shortstop with 5,139;[1][2][3] he is the only shortstop to record more than 5,000 career putouts.

Key

Rank Rank amongst leaders in career putouts. A blank field indicates a tie.
Player (2024 POs) Number of recorded putouts during the 2024 Major League Baseball season
MLB Total career putouts as a shortstop in Major League Baseball
* Denotes elected to National Baseball Hall of Fame
Bold Denotes active player[a]

List

Elvis Andrus, the active leader in putouts by a shortstop and 50th all-time.
Bill Dahlen held the major league record for 22 years.
Luis Aparicio holds the American League record.
Luke Appling held the American League record for 25 years.
Donie Bush held the American League record for 30 years; his 425 putouts in 1914 are the most by any shortstop since 1900.
Cal Ripken Jr. led the American League in putouts a record six times.
Rank Player (2024 POs) Putouts as a shortstop Other leagues, notes
MLB American League National League
1 Rabbit Maranville* 5,139 0 5,139
2 Bill Dahlen 4,856 0 4,856 Held major league record, 1908–1930; held National League record, 1905-1930
3 Dave Bancroft* 4,623 0 4,623
4 Honus Wagner* 4,576 0 4,576
5 Tommy Corcoran 4,556 0 4,043 Includes 300 in American Association, 213 in Players' League; held major league record, 1905-1908
6 Luis Aparicio* 4,548 4,548 0
7 Luke Appling* 4,398 4,398 0 Held American League record, 1948-1973
8 Ozzie Smith* 4,249 0 4,249
9 Herman Long 4,229 142 3,752 Includes 335 in American Association; held major league record, 1898–1905; held National League record, 1899–1905; held single-season record, 1889–1890, 1891-1895
10 Bobby Wallace* 4,142 3,227 915 Held American League record, 1908-1918
11 Omar Vizquel 4,102 3,357 745
12 Pee Wee Reese* 4,040 0 4,040
13 Donie Bush 4,038 4,038 0 Held American League record, 1918–1948; holds the single-season record of 425 (set in 1914; tie)
14 Monte Cross 3,980 1,588 2,392 Held American League single-season record, 1902-1905
15 Roger Peckinpaugh 3,919 3,919 0
16 Dick Bartell 3,872 307 3,565
17 Derek Jeter* 3,820 3,820 0
18 Joe Tinker* 3,768 0 3,481 Includes 287 in Federal League
19 Roy McMillan 3,705 0 3,705
20 Joe Cronin* 3,696 3,693 3
21 Dave Concepción 3,670 0 3,670
22 Cal Ripken Jr.* 3,651 3,651 0
23 Bert Campaneris 3,608 3,608 0
24 George McBride 3,585 3,235 350
25 Mickey Doolin 3,578 0 2,924 Includes 654 in Federal League
26 Dick Groat 3,505 0 3,505
27 Garry Templeton 3,393 0 3,393
28 Alan Trammell* 3,391 3,391 0
29 Everett Scott 3,351 3,343 8
30 Larry Bowa 3,314 0 3,314
31 George Davis* 3,239 1,503 1,736
32 Phil Rizzuto* 3,219 3,219 0
33 Leo Cárdenas 3,218 1,198 2,020
34 Alfredo Griffin 3,207 2,447 760
35 Don Kessinger 3,151 260 2,891
36 Barry Larkin* 3,150 0 3,150
37 Billy Jurges 3,133 0 3,133
38 Lou Boudreau* 3,132 3,132 0
39 Leo Durocher* 3,097 243 2,854
40 Royce Clayton 3,095 992 2,103
41 Frankie Crosetti 3,061 3,061 0
42 Chris Speier 3,057 14 3,043
43 Mark Belanger 3,005 2,985 20
44 Arky Vaughan* 2,995 0 2,995
45 Marty Marion 2,986 105 2,881
46 Jimmy Rollins 2,982 47 2,935
47 Eddie Miller 2,976 0 2,976
48 Édgar Rentería 2,963 424 2,539
49 Wally Gerber 2,960 2,873 87
50 Elvis Andrus (0) 2,925 2,925 0
51 Ed Brinkman 2,924 2,884 40
52 Ozzie Guillén 2,911 2,764 147
53 Miguel Tejada 2,891 2,378 513
54 Travis Jackson* 2,878 0 2,878
55 Art Fletcher 2,836 0 2,836
56 Orlando Cabrera 2,823 1,301 1,522
Jack Glasscock 2,823 0 2,778 Includes 45 in Union Association; held major league record, 1886–1898; held National League record, 1885–1899; held NL single-season record, 1889-1890
58 Ed McKean 2,822 0 2,507 Includes 315 in American Association
59 Germany Smith 2,816 0 1,979 Includes 797 in American Association, 40 in Union Association
60 Eddie Joost 2,755 2,039 716
61 Tony Fernández 2,708 2,132 576
62 Freddie Patek 2,690 2,261 429
63 Tim Foli 2,687 387 2,300
64 Alvin Dark 2,672 0 2,672
65 Johnny Logan 2,612 0 2,612
66 Mike Bordick 2,606 2,535 71
67 Joe Sewell* 2,591 2,591 0
68 Robin Yount* 2,588 2,588 0
69 Bones Ely 2,585 323 2,181 Includes 81 in American Association
70 Greg Gagne 2,559 2,201 358
71 Maury Wills 2,550 0 2,550
72 Bill Russell 2,536 0 2,536
73 Doc Lavan 2,451 1,300 1,151
74 Jim Fregosi 2,397 2,364 33
75 Ivy Olson 2,389 469 1,920
76 Bud Harrelson 2,387 118 2,269
77 Vern Stephens 2,385 2,385 0
78 Hughie Jennings* 2,384 1 2,202 Includes 181 in American Association; holds the single-season record of 425 (set in 1895; tie)
79 Rafael Furcal 2,373 0 2,373
Lyn Lary 2,373 2,303 70
81 Billy Rogell 2,362 2,355 7
82 Jay Bell 2,309 397 1,912
83 Shawon Dunston 2,287 13 2,274
84 Al Bridwell 2,267 0 2,050 Includes 217 in Federal League
85 Álex González 2,259 325 1,934
86 Freddy Parent 2,253 2,253 0 Held American League record, 1905-1907
87 Ray Chapman 2,204 2,204 0
88 Kid Elberfeld 2,184 2,105 79 Held American League record, 1901–1905, 1907–1908; held AL single-season record, 1901-1902
89 Rafael Ramírez 2,159 0 2,159
90 Brandon Crawford (13) 2,158 0 2,158
90 Glenn Wright 2,156 0 2,156
92 Rick Burleson 2,151 2,151 0
93 Dick Schofield 2,140 1,932 208
94 Chico Carrasquel 2,131 2,131 0
95 Zoilo Versalles 2,126 1,890 236
96 Bucky Dent 2,116 2,116 0
97 Jhonny Peralta 2,097 1,738 359
98 Alcides Escobar 2,095 1,717 378
99 José Reyes 2,092 339 1,753
100 J. J. Hardy 2,089 1,389 700

Other Hall of Famers

Player Assists as shortstop Other leagues, notes
MLB American League National League
John Montgomery Ward* 1,522 0 1,219 Includes 303 in Players' League; held single-season record, 1887–1889; held NL single-season record, 1885-1889
Willie Wells* 1,161 0 0 Includes 549 in Negro National League (first), 513 in Negro National League (second),
89 in East–West League, 10 in Negro American League (incomplete)
George Wright* 714 0 314 Includes 400 in National Association; held major league record, 1872-1882
Rogers Hornsby* 691 0 691
John Henry Lloyd* 340 0 0 Includes 256 in Negro National League (first), 84 in Eastern Colored League (incomplete)
John McGraw* 334 0 302 Includes 32 in American Association
Martín Dihigo* 188 0 0 Includes 99 in Eastern Colored League, 85 in American Negro League,
4 in Negro National League (second) (incomplete)
Ed Delahanty* 187 0 44 Includes 143 in the Players' League
Tony Lazzeri* 136 103 33
King Kelly* 128 0 81 Includes 43 in the Players' League, 4 in American Association
Jackie Robinson* 61 0 2 Includes 59 in Negro American League (incomplete)
Ray Dandridge* 51 0 0 Includes 51 in Negro National League (second) (incomplete)
Adrián Beltré* 6 0 6

Notes

  1. ^ A player is considered inactive if he has announced his retirement or has not played for a full season.

References

  1. ^ "Rabbit Maranville Career Stats". Baseball Reference. Retrieved July 28, 2021.
  2. ^ Leyden, Dick. "Rabbit Maranville Bio". Society For American Baseball Research. Retrieved July 28, 2021.
  3. ^ "Rabbit Maranville Hall of Fame Profile". National Baseball Hall of Fame. Retrieved August 1, 2021.