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This is a list of Malaysian inventions details the indigenous arts and techniques, Malaysian inventions, Malaysian discoveries and contributions of the people of Malaysia — both ancient and modern state of Malaysia.[citation needed]

Architecture

Attap dwelling[citation needed]
Five-foot way[citation needed]
Malay house[citation needed]

A traditional Malay house prior to the arrival of foreign or modern influences.[citation needed]

Rumah Panjang[citation needed]

A traditional Bornean house prior to the arrival of foreign or modern influences.

Sino-Portuguese architecture[citation needed]

A traditional colonial architecture of Malaysia, incorporating Malay, Chinese and European architectural styles.

Surau[citation needed]

A building used by Malay people for worship and religious instruction. Generally smaller physical structures than a mosque but has similar, its functions.

Clothing

Game

Batu Seremban

A popular Malay game[citation needed]

Congkak

A Malay traditional mancala that is often played as indoor activities. Congkak may have been spread from Malacca, as Malacca was once an important trading port of the Malay archipelago.[1][2]

Gasing

A popular Malay game since the time of the Sultanate of Malacca in the 15th century. The game was usually played at the end of the rice harvest.[3]

Gasing Pangkah

A competitive Malay game of gasing in which two or more players compete to strike each other's gasing out of a circle or to make it fall over and stop spinning.

Rimau

A Malay abstract strategy board game.[citation needed]

Wau

An intricately designed kite that is traditionally flown in Kelantan, and one of the national symbols of Malaysia.[citation needed]

Literature

Dunging script

An alternative script for Iban language that was invented by Dunging Anak Gunggu in 1947.[4]

Hikayat Hang Tuah

Classical Malay literature that tells the tale of the legendary Malay warrior, Hang Tuah and his four warrior companions – Hang Jebat, Hang Kasturi, Hang Lekir and Hang Lekiu – who lived during the height of the Sultanate of Malacca in the 15th century.[citation needed]

Jawi script

An alternative script for Malay language and several other languages of Malay world, such as Acehnese, Banjarese, Minangkabau and Tausūg. The oldest remains of Malay using the Jawi script have been found on the Terengganu Inscription Stone, dated 702 AH (1303 CE).[5]

Pantun

Pantun is a form of traditional oral expression. The first examples to be recorded appear in Sejarah Melayu and Hikayat Hang Tuah.[citation needed]

Sejarah Melayu

Classical Malay literature that tells the romanticised history of the origin, growth and collapse of the Sultanate of Malacca.[citation needed]

Medicine

Music

A sompoton
Bungkau

Invented by the indigenous people of Dusun in Sabah, a type of jaw harp instruments.[citation needed]

Dondang Sayang[citation needed]
Gambus[citation needed]

Invented by the Malay people in Johor.[citation needed]

Gendang[citation needed]
Kertok[citation needed]
Krem[citation needed]
Kulintangan[citation needed]
Mak Yong[citation needed]
Malay ghazal[citation needed]
Rebana[citation needed]
Sapeh

Invented by the indigenous people of Orang Ulu in Sarawak, a type of traditional string instrument.[6]

Seruling[citation needed]
Sompoton[citation needed]

Invented by the indigenous people of Dusun in Sabah, a type of mouth organ instruments.[7]

Philosophy

Adat

Adat Temenggung and Adat perpatih, two variants of Malay customary practices and tradition observed in Malaysia.[citation needed]

Duit Raya

A custom of giving out money to the guests during the festival of Hari Raya.[citation needed]

Gotong royong

A Malaysian communal work.[citation needed]

Islam Hadhari

A modern idea that emphasises the importance of progress with an Islamic perspective in terms of economic, social, and political fields, as well as diversity and tolerance.[citation needed]

Rukun Negara

A Malaysian declaration of national allegiance.[citation needed]

Sembah

A Malay greeting and gesture as a way of demonstrating respect and reverence towards the royalties.[citation needed]

Tajul Muluk

A system of geomancy that was practiced by the Malays. Dukun and bomoh who practice this knowledge would apply the principles of metaphysical and geomantic in the planning, development and construction of buildings.[citation needed]

Kaamatan

Kaaamatan or Pesta kaamatan is a form of harvest festival celebrated annually in the state of Sabah in Malaysia. It is normally celebrated by the ethnic Kadazan-Dusuns, as well as by other related ethnic groups in the state, and lasts for the whole of the month of May, ending with a public holiday on a date selected by a priestess known as the bobohizan.[citation needed]

Gawai

Gawai Dayak is an annual festival celebrated by the Dayak people in Sarawak, Malaysia and West Kalimantan, Indonesia on 1 and 2 June. It is a public holiday in Sarawak and is both a religious and a social occasion recognised since 1957.[8]

Ships

Bajak

A type of sailing vessels of the Iban people of Sarawak.[citation needed]

Bangkong

A type of war boats used by the Iban people of Sarawak.[citation needed]

Bedar

A type of traditional sailing vessels from Terengganu.[citation needed]

Buggoh

A type of small dugout canoe of the Sama-Bajau people of Sabah.[citation needed]

Birau

A type of small dugout canoe of the Sama-Bajau people of Sabah.[citation needed]

Jong

A type of ancient sailing vessels used by Malay sailors.[citation needed]

Ghali

A type of galley-like ships in Malay archipelago.[citation needed]

Ghurab

A type of merchant and warship in Malay archipelago.[citation needed]

Kakap

A narrow river or coastal fishing boat in Malay archipelago.[citation needed]

Kolek

A traditional fishing boat from Kelantan.[citation needed]

Lancang

A type of sailing vessels used in Malay archipelago.[citation needed]

Lancaran

A type of sailing vessel used in Malay archipelago.[citation needed]

Lepa

A traditional boat used by Sama-Bajau people in Sabah.[citation needed]

Pelang

A traditional boat in Malay archipelago.[citation needed]

Pencalang

A traditional merchant ship from Malay peninsula.[citation needed]

Penjajap

A type of boats used to carry goods along rivers and coastline in Malay archipelago.[citation needed]

Perahu payang

A traditional fishing boat from Terengganu.[citation needed]

Perahu tambangan[citation needed]
Pinas

A type of traditional sailing vessels from Terengganu.[citation needed]

Sampan panjang

A type of fast boats used by Orang Laut in Malay archipelago.[citation needed]

Tongkang

A type of boats used to carry goods along rivers and coastline in Malay archipelago.[citation needed]

Sports

Ruby Tens

A Malaysian variant of the rugby union.[citation needed]

Sepak Takraw

It was known as Sepak Raga and was mostly played by the royal court of Sultanate of Malacca in the 15th century. By 1940, the net version of the game was popularised by Malaysia and spread across Southeast Asia and formal rules and regulations were formed for the game.[citation needed]

Silat

A combative art of self-defence originated in the Malay archipelago. Silat also has evolved into a practice of physical and spiritual training also encompassing traditional Malay attire, musical instruments and customs.[citation needed]

Jombola

A racket sport similar to pickleball developed by Sukdev Singh from Kuala Lumpur in 2006.[9][10]

Technology

Automatic egg boiler

Invented by Hew Ah Kow, a detachable 4-piece plastic ware.[11][better source needed]

Bakakuk

Invented by indigenous people in the state of Sabah, a homemade shotgun used for hunting wild animals and protect traditional farms of the local natives.[12]

Flipper toothbrush cover

Invented by Goo Yock Tee and Tang Peng Kee, a unique and globally-patented[13] one-touch mechanism flips open/close automatically in response to the gentle tug or push of the toothbrush.[11][failed verification]

Greener/cheaper water dispensers

Invented by Ooi Seng Chye, a water dispensing machine which processes raw sewage water into clean drinking water through reverse osmosis method.[11][failed verification]

Lytro camera

Invented by Ren Ng, a camera technology to solves the problem of unfocused photos.[11][better source needed]

Nehemiah walls

Invented by Nehemiah Lee, fly-over walls consists of three major components: a facade, reinforcing bars, and soil. The wall comprises hexagonal (honeycomb-shaped) blocks of pre-cast concrete, each interlocked with dowel bars.[11][better source needed]

Rainbow Loom

Cheong Choon Ng was born in Taiping, Perak.[14] He emigrated to United States and graduated as a mechanical engineer. He also obtained a US citizenship. During his stay at the United States, he invented and commercialised a plastic device for turning small rubber bands into jewelry and other products.[15]

Rubber stamp machine

Robest Yong was born and raised in Georgetown, Penang. In 1994, he invented a machine to make rubber stamp faster which only takes five minutes when compared to the plaster moulds method that can take weeks to make a rubber stamp.[16]

Starlight TDR,

an automation software turns firewall logs into automated cyber threat incident response[17][better source needed] Invented by Malaysian by providing alternative solution to help companies reducing cyber threat attack surfaces

USB flash drive

Pua Khein-Seng was born and raised in Sekinchan, Selangor. He graduated from a Taiwanese university as an electrical engineer and co-founded a Taiwanese company named Phison with four others in 2000. The company later developed a USB flash controller in 2001. The company also opened a research and development (R&D) centre in Penang.[18][19][20] For his contribution to the electronics industry in the state of Penang, Pua was awarded the title Datuk by the governor of Penang in 2012.[20] Apart from Pua Khein-Seng, other companies such as M-Systems from Israel,[21] Shimon Shmueli, an employee from IBM,[22] Trek 2000 International from Singapore,[23] and Netac Technology from China also staked the claim as the inventor of flash drive.[24]

References

  1. ^ "Congkak, Permainan Tradisi Melayu | Pusat Antarabangsa (I-PUTRA)".
  2. ^ "Congkak | Infopedia".
  3. ^ "Gasing | Infopedia".
  4. ^ "Iban language and alphabet".
  5. ^ http://www.unesco.org/new/fileadmin/MULTIMEDIA/HQ/CI/CI/pdf/mow/nomination_forms/Malaysia+Terengganu.pdf[bare URL PDF]
  6. ^ Moh, Jane (12 February 2017). "The sound of Sape". The Borneo Post. Archived from the original on 10 June 2022. Retrieved 28 June 2022.
  7. ^ Patricia Matusky; Tan Sooi Beng (28 April 2017). The Music of Malaysia: The Classical, Folk and Syncretic Traditions. Taylor & Francis. pp. 261–285. ISBN 978-1-351-83965-5.
  8. ^ Bowden, David (2 June 2022). "#JOM! GO: Celebrating Gawai". New Straits Times. Archived from the original on 28 June 2022. Retrieved 28 June 2022.
  9. ^ Chong, Sulyn (17 November 2018). "Jombola, a new sport to rival badminton?". New Straits Times. Archived from the original on 1 June 2022. Retrieved 1 June 2022.
  10. ^ "Jombola Sport". Jombola International. Archived from the original on 11 August 2020. Retrieved 1 June 2022.
  11. ^ a b c d e Darian Goh (26 June 2015). "8 Everyday Things You Didn't Know Were Invented By Malaysians". Says.com. Archived from the original on 22 April 2017. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  12. ^ D. Raj (4 August 2013). "Bakakuk: A home-made killer". The Star. Archived from the original on 22 April 2017. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  13. ^ "Goo Yock Tee Inventions, Patents and Patent Applications – Justia Patents Search". Patents.justia.com. Retrieved 26 June 2018.
  14. ^ "From rubber bands to riches". New Straits Times. 21 September 2014. Archived from the original on 28 June 2022. Retrieved 28 June 2022.
  15. ^ Martin, Claire (9 July 2021). "Rainbow Loom's Success, From 2,000 Pounds of Rubber Bands". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 9 July 2021. Retrieved 28 June 2022.
  16. ^ Malaysian Innovators - Journey of Creativity to Reality (PDF). Petaling Jaya, Selangor: Malaysia Productivity Corporation. November 2010. pp. 1–99. ISBN 9789832025771. Archived from the original (PDF) on 17 April 2018. Retrieved 29 June 2022.
  17. ^ "Starlight Intelligence". www.starlightintel.com. Retrieved 4 February 2021.
  18. ^ "Something from nothing". The Star (Malaysia). 5 October 2015. Archived from the original on 22 October 2021. Retrieved 28 June 2022.
  19. ^ See Hoh, Kong (29 July 2014). "Press Digest - Pen-drive man laments shortage of local talent". The Sun Daily. Archived from the original on 21 October 2021. Retrieved 28 June 2022.
  20. ^ a b Kwan Yee, Kow (17 July 2012). "'Father of pen drive' now a Datuk". The Star (Malaysia). Archived from the original on 11 November 2021. Retrieved 30 June 2022.
  21. ^ "M-Systems Patents USB Flash Drive". Center of Israel Education. Archived from the original on 8 April 2022. Retrieved 28 June 2022.
  22. ^ Buchanan, Matt (14 June 2013). "Object of Interest: The flash drive". The New Yorker. Archived from the original on 22 June 2022. Retrieved 28 June 2022.
  23. ^ Jean, Lim. "Trek 2000 and the ThumbDrive". Archived from the original on 12 April 2022. Retrieved 28 June 2022.
  24. ^ Peng, Xin. "Patent Expires for Flash Memory Sticks, Invented by a Chinese Company". Jiemian Global. Archived from the original on 12 April 2022. Retrieved 28 June 2022.