Max Born, one of the founding fathers of quantum mechanics, was Tait Professor of Natural Philosophy from 1936 to 1953 at  the University of Edinburgh. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1954.[1]
Max Born, one of the founding fathers of quantum mechanics, was Tait Professor of Natural Philosophy from 1936 to 1953 at the University of Edinburgh. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1954.[1]

This list of Nobel laureates affiliated with the University of Edinburgh comprehensively shows the alumni, faculty members as well as researchers of the University of Edinburgh who were awarded the Nobel Prize or the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences. The Nobel Prizes, established by the 1895 will of Alfred Nobel, are awarded to individuals who make outstanding contributions in the fields of Chemistry, Literature, Peace, Physics, and Physiology or Medicine.[2] An associated prize, the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel (commonly known as the Nobel Prize in Economics), was instituted by Sweden's central bank, Sveriges Riksbank, in 1968 and first awarded in 1969.[3]

As of October 2020, 19 Nobel laureates have been affiliated with the University of Edinburgh as alumni, faculty members or researchers. Among the laureates, six are Edinburgh alumni (graduates and attendees), and five have been long-term academic members of the Edinburgh faculty. Three additional laureates had acted as administrative staff of the university.[4] The University of Edinburgh has the most Nobel affiliations among universities in Scotland.

Inclusion criteria

The university's Old College
The university's Old College

The university affiliations in this list are all official academic affiliations such as degree programs and official academic employment, including academic positions at research organizations formally affiliated with or operated by the University of Edinburgh. Non-academic affiliations such as advisory committee and administrative staff are generally excluded. The official academic affiliations fall into three categories: 1) Alumni (graduates and attendees), 2) Long-term academic staff, and 3) Short-term academic staff. Graduates are defined as those who hold Bachelor's, Master's, Doctorate or equivalent degrees from Edinburgh, while attendees are those who formally enrolled in degree programs at Edinburgh but did not complete the programs; thus, honorary degrees, posthumous degrees, summer attendees, exchange students and auditing students are excluded. The category of "Long-term academic staff" consists of tenure or tenure-track and equivalent academic positions, while that of "Short-term academic staff" consists of lecturers (without tenure), postdoctoral researchers (postdocs), visiting professors or scholars (visitors), and equivalent academic positions. The specific academic title solely determines the type of affiliation, regardless of the actual time the position was held by a laureate.

Further explanations on "visitors" under "Short-term academic staff" are now presented. 1) All informal or personal visits are excluded from the list; 2) all employment-based visiting positions, which carry teaching or research duties, are included as affiliations in the list; 3) for award-based visiting positions, this list includes the positions as affiliations only if the laureates were required to assume employment-level duty (teaching or research) or the laureates specifically classified the visiting positions as "appointment" or similar in reliable sources such as their curriculum vitae. To be specific, some award/honor-based visiting positions such as the "Gifford Lectureship" at the University of Edinburgh are awards/honors without employment-level duty. In particular, attending meetings and giving public lectures, talks or non-curricular seminars at Edinburgh is not a form of employment-level duty; attending meetings and giving public lectures, talks or non-curricular seminars are not employment-level duties. Finally, summer visitors are generally excluded from the list unless summer work yielded significant end products such as research publications and components of Nobel-winning work, since summer terms are not part of formal academic years.

Some visitors and staff not qualified as official academic affiliates
Laureate Nobel Prize Year Relation to the University of Edinburgh
Randy W. Schekman Physiology or Medicine 2013 Exchange student (from UCLA)[5]
Winston Churchill Literature 1954 Administrative staff: Rector (1929–1932)[6][7]
Edward Victor Appleton Physics 1947 Administrative staff: Principal and Vice-Chancellor (1949–1965)[8][9]
Alexander Fleming Physiology or Medicine 1945 Administrative staff: Rector (1951–1954)[10][11]
Niels Bohr Physics 1922 Gifford Lectures entitled Causality and Complementarity: Epistemological Lessons of Studies in Atomic Physics in 1949[12][13]

Summary

See also: List of Nobel laureates by university affiliation

In the following table, the number following a person's name is the year they received the prize. In particular, a number with an asterisk (*) means the person received the award while they were working at the University of Edinburgh (including emeritus staff). A name underlined implies that this person has been listed previously (i.e., multiple affiliations).

Alumni Long-term academic staff Short-term academic staff
Physics (4)
  1. Igor Tamm - 1958
  1. Peter Higgs - 2013*
  2. Max Born - 1954*
  3. Charles Glover Barkla - 1917*
Chemistry (6)
  1. Richard Henderson - 2017
  2. Fraser Stoddart - 2016
  1. Peter D. Mitchell - 1978
  1. Kurt Wüthrich - 2002
  2. Alexander R. Todd - 1957
  3. Vincent du Vigneaud - 1955
Physiology or Medicine (7)
  1. Robert G. Edwards - 2010
  2. Peter C. Doherty - 1996
  1. Hermann J. Muller - 1946
  1. Michael Rosbash - 2017
  2. Edvard Moser - 2014
  3. May-Britt Moser - 2014
  4. Robert G. Edwards - 2010
  5. Paul Nurse - 2001
Economics (1)
  1. James Mirrlees - 1996
Peace (1)
  1. Joseph Rotblat - 1995

Nobel laureates by category

Nobel Prize in Physics

Year Image Laureate Relation Rationale
1917
Charles Glover Barkla Professor of Natural Philosophy, 1913–1944[14] "for his discovery of the characteristic Röntgen radiation of the elements"[15]
1954
Max Born Tait Professor of Natural Philosophy, 1936–1953[1] "for his fundamental research in quantum mechanics, especially for his statistical interpretation of the wavefunction"[16]
1958
Igor Tamm Undergraduate attendee, 1913–1914[17] "for the discovery and the interpretation of the Cherenkov effect"[18]
2013
Peter Higgs Royal Commission for the Exhibition of 1851 senior student 1954–1955, senior research fellow 1955–1956, lecturer in Mathematical Physics 1960–1970, reader 1970–1980, professor 1980–1996, and emeritus professor 1996–present[19] "for the theoretical discovery of a mechanism that contributes to our understanding of the origin of mass of subatomic particles, and which recently was confirmed through the discovery of the predicted fundamental particle"[20]

Nobel Prize in Chemistry

Year Image Laureate Relation Rationale
1955
Vincent du Vigneaud National Research Council Fellow, 1929[21] "for his work on biochemically important sulphur compounds, especially for the first synthesis of a polypeptide hormone"[22]
1957
Alexander R. Todd Academic staff, 1934–1936[23] "for his work on nucleotides and nucleotide co-enzymes"[24]
1978
Peter D. Mitchell Academic staff 1955–1960, senior lecturer 1961–1962, and reader 1962–1963 at the Department of Zoology[25] "for his contribution to the understanding of biological energy transfer through the formulation of the chemiosmotic theory"[26]
2002
Kurt Wuthrich Visiting Professor, 1997–2000[27] "for the development of methods for identification and structure analyses of biological macromolecules [...] for their development of soft desorption ionisation methods for mass spectrometric analyses of biological macromolecules"[28]
2016
Sir Fraser Stoddart BSc 1964, PhD 1966[29] "for the design and synthesis of molecular machines"[30]
2017
Richard Henderson BSc 1966, Honorary doctor of science 2008[31] "for developing cryo-electron microscopy for the high-resolution structure determination of biomolecules in solution"[32]

Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

Year Image Laureate Relation Rationale
1946
Hermann J. Muller Academic staff at the Institute of Animal Genetics (now amalgamated into the School of Biological Sciences), 1937–1940[33] "for the discovery of the production of mutations by means of X-ray irradiation"[34]
1996
Peter C. Doherty PhD 1970[35] "for their discoveries concerning the specificity of the cell mediated immune defence"[36]
2001
Sir Paul Nurse Post-doctoral researcher, 1973–1979[37] "for their discoveries of key regulators of the cell cycle"[38]
2010
Sir Robert G. Edwards Diploma in Animal Genetics 1952, PhD 1955, and post-doctoral researcher 1955–1957[39] "for the development of in vitro fertilization"[40]
2014
May-Britt Moser Post-doctoral researcher, 1995–1997[41] "for their discoveries of cells that constitute a positioning system in the brain"[42]
Edvard Moser Post-doctoral researcher 1995–1997, Honorary Professor[43]
2017
Michael Rosbash Post-doctoral researcher, 1970s[44] "for their discoveries of molecular mechanisms controlling the circadian rhythm"[45]

Nobel Peace Prize

Year Image Laureate Relation Rationale
1995
Sir Joseph Rotblat Montague Visiting Professor of International Relations, 1975–1976[46] "for their efforts to diminish the part played by nuclear arms in international politics and, in the longer run, to eliminate such arms"[47]

Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences

Year Image Laureate Relation Rationale
1996
Sir James Mirrlees MA in Mathematics and Natural Philosophy, 1954–1957[48] "for their fundamental contributions to the economic theory of incentives under asymmetric information"[49]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "Max Born - Biographical". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 13 July 2021.
  2. ^ "Alfred Nobel – The Man Behind the Nobel Prize". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 18 May 2017.
  3. ^ "The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 18 May 2017.
  4. ^ "Nobel Prizes". The University of Edinburgh. Retrieved 27 March 2019.
  5. ^ "Randy W. Schekman - Biographical". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 13 July 2021.
  6. ^ "Winston Churchill - Biographical". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 13 July 2021.
  7. ^ "The Rector". The University of Edinburgh. Retrieved 4 June 2015.
  8. ^ "Sir Edward Appleton (1892 - 1965)". BBC. Retrieved 4 June 2015.
  9. ^ "Sir Edward Victor Appleton". The University of Edinburgh. Retrieved 4 June 2015.
  10. ^ "Edward V. Appleton - Biographical". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 13 July 2021.
  11. ^ "Sir Alexander Fleming - Biographical". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 1 June 2015.
  12. ^ "Niels Bohr - Biographical". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 13 July 2021.
  13. ^ McGrath, Alister E. (1 January 2003). A Scientific Theology, Volume 3. A&C Black. p. 19. ISBN 0567083497.
  14. ^ "Charles Glover Barkla - Biographical". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 13 July 2021.
  15. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physics 1917". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 12 August 2021.
  16. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physics 1954". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 12 August 2021.
  17. ^ "Igor Y. Tamm - Biographical". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 13 July 2021.
  18. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physics 1958". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 12 August 2021.
  19. ^ "Peter Higgs - Biographical". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 13 July 2021.
  20. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physics 2013". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 12 August 2021.
  21. ^ "Vincent du Vigneaud - Biographical". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 13 July 2021.
  22. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1955". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 12 August 2021.
  23. ^ "Lord Todd - Biographical". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 13 July 2021.
  24. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1957". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 12 August 2021.
  25. ^ "Peter Mitchell - Biographical". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 13 July 2021.
  26. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1978". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 12 August 2021.
  27. ^ "Kurt Wüthrich - Biographical". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 13 July 2021.
  28. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2002". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 12 August 2021.
  29. ^ "Sir J. Fraser Stoddart - Biographical". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 13 July 2021.
  30. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2016". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 12 August 2021.
  31. ^ "Richard Henderson - Biographical". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 13 July 2021.
  32. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2017". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 12 August 2021.
  33. ^ "Hermann J. Muller - Biographical". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 13 July 2021.
  34. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1946". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 12 August 2021.
  35. ^ "Peter C. Doherty - Biographical". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 13 July 2021.
  36. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1996". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 12 August 2021.
  37. ^ "Sir Paul Nurse - Biographical". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 13 July 2021.
  38. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2001". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 12 August 2021.
  39. ^ "Robert G. Edwards - Biographical". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 13 July 2021.
  40. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2010". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 12 August 2021.
  41. ^ "May-Britt Moser - Biographical". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 13 July 2021.
  42. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2014". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 12 August 2021.
  43. ^ "Edvard Moser - Biographical". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 13 July 2021.
  44. ^ "Michael Rosbash - Biographical". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 13 July 2021.
  45. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2017". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 12 August 2021.
  46. ^ "Joseph Rotblat - Biographical". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 13 July 2021.
  47. ^ "The Nobel Peace Prize 1995". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 12 August 2021.
  48. ^ "James A. Mirrlees - Biographical". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 13 July 2021.
  49. ^ "The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel 1996". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 12 August 2021.