A request that this article title be changed to List of parliamentary constituencies in Greater Manchester is under discussion. Please do not move this article until the discussion is closed.

The ceremonial and metropolitan county of Greater Manchester is divided into 27 Parliamentary constituencies—16 borough constituencies and 11 county constituencies. At the 2019 general election in Greater Manchester, Labour won 18 seats and the Conservatives won 9.

Constituencies

Further information: 2019 United Kingdom general election

  † Conservative   ‡ Labour   ¤ Liberal Democrat

Constituency[nb 1] Electorate[1] Majority[2][nb 2] Member of Parliament[2] Nearest opposition[2] Map
Altrincham and Sale West BC 73,107 6,139 Sir Graham Brady (Con) Andrew Western (Lab)
Ashton-under-Lyne BC 67,978 4,263 Angela Rayner (Lab) Dan Costello (Con)
Blackley and Broughton BC 73,372 14,402 Graham Stringer (Lab) Alexander Elias (Con)
Bolton North East BC 67,564 378 Mark Logan (Con) Sir David Crausby (Lab)
Bolton South East BC 69,163 7,598 Yasmin Qureshi (Lab) Johno Lee (Con)
Bolton West CC 73,191 8,855 Chris Green (Con) Julie Hilling (Lab)
Bury North BC 68,802 105 James Daly (Con) James Frith (Lab)
Bury South BC 75,152 402 Christian Wakeford (Lab) (formerly Conservative) Lucy Burke (Lab)
Cheadle BC 74,577 2,336 Mary Robinson (Con) Tom Morrison (Lib Dem)
Denton and Reddish BC 66,234 6,175 Andrew Gwynne (Lab) Iain Bott (Con)
Hazel Grove CC 63,346 4,423 William Wragg (Con) Lisa Smart (Lib Dem)
Heywood and Middleton CC 80,162 663 Chris Clarkson (Con) Liz McInnes (Lab)
Leigh CC 77,417 1,965 James Grundy (Con) Joanne Platt (Lab)
Makerfield CC 74,190 4,740 Yvonne Fovargue (Lab) Nick King (Con)
Manchester, Central BC 92,247 29,089 Lucy Powell (Lab) Shaden Jaradat (Con)
Manchester, Gorton BC 76,419 30,339 Afzal Khan (Lab) Sebastian Lowe (Con)
Manchester, Withington BC 76,530 27,905 Jeff Smith (Lab) John Leech (Lib Dem)
Oldham East and Saddleworth CC 72,120 1,499 Debbie Abrahams (Lab) Tom Lord (Con)
Oldham West and Royton CC 72,999 11,127 Jim McMahon (Lab) Kirsty Finlayson (Con)
Rochdale CC 78,909 9,668 Tony Lloyd (Lab) Atifa Shah (Con)
Salford and Eccles BC 82,202 16,327 Rebecca Long-Bailey (Lab) Attika Choudhary (Con)
Stalybridge and Hyde CC 73,604 2,946 Jonathan Reynolds (Lab) Tayub Amjad (Con)
Stockport BC 65,391 10,039 Nav Mishra (Lab) Isy Imarni (Con)
Stretford and Urmston BC 72,372 16,471 Kate Green (Lab) Mussadak Mirza (Con)
Wigan CC 75,860 6,728 Lisa Nandy (Lab) Ashley Williams (Con)
Worsley and Eccles South CC 75,219 3,219 Barbara Keeley (Lab) Arnie Saunders (Con)
Wythenshawe and Sale East BC 76,313 10,396 Mike Kane (Lab) Peter Harrop (Con)

2010 boundary changes

Under the Fifth Periodic Review of Westminster constituencies, the Boundary Commission for England decided to reduce the number of seats in Greater Manchester from 28 to 27, leading to significant changes in the city of Salford, where the three constituencies of Eccles, Salford and Worsley were abolished and replaced by the two constituencies of Salford and Eccles, and Worsley and Eccles South. Manchester, Blackley was replaced with Blackley and Broughton.

Former boundaries

Former name Boundaries 1997-2010
  1. Altrincham and Sale West BC
  2. Ashton under Lyne BC
  3. Bolton North East BC
  4. Bolton South East BC
  5. Bolton West CC
  6. Bury North BC
  7. Bury South BC
  8. Cheadle BC
  9. Denton and Reddish BC
  10. Eccles BC
  11. Hazel Grove CC
  12. Heywood and Middleton CC
  13. Leigh CC
  14. Makerfield CC
  1. Manchester, Blackley BC
  2. Manchester Central BC
  3. Manchester, Gorton BC
  4. Manchester, Withington BC
  5. Oldham East and Saddleworth CC
  6. Oldham West and Royton BC
  7. Rochdale CC
  8. Salford BC
  9. Stalybridge and Hyde CC
  10. Stockport BC
  11. Stretford and Urmston BC
  12. Wigan CC
  13. Worsley CC
  14. Wythenshawe and Sale East BC

Current boundaries

Current name Boundaries 2010–present
  1. Altrincham and Sale West BC
  2. Ashton-under-Lyne BC
  3. Blackley and Broughton BC
  4. Bolton North East BC
  5. Bolton South East BC
  6. Bolton West CC
  7. Bury North BC
  8. Bury South BC
  9. Cheadle BC
  10. Denton and Reddish BC
  11. Hazel Grove CC
  12. Heywood and Middleton CC
  13. Leigh CC
  14. Makerfield CC
  1. Manchester Central BC
  2. Manchester, Gorton BC
  3. Manchester, Withington BC
  4. Oldham East and Saddleworth CC
  5. Oldham West and Royton CC
  6. Rochdale CC
  7. Salford and Eccles BC
  8. Stalybridge and Hyde CC
  9. Stockport BC
  10. Stretford and Urmston BC
  11. Wigan CC
  12. Worsley and Eccles South CC
  13. Wythenshawe and Sale East BC

Proposed boundary changes

See 2023 Periodic Review of Westminster constituencies for further details.

Following the abandonment of the Sixth Periodic Review (the 2018 review), the Boundary Commission for England formally launched the 2023 Review on 5 January 2021 and published their initial proposals on 8 June 2021.[3]

The commission has proposed that Greater Manchester be considered as a sub-region of the North West Region, retaining a total of 27 constituencies. However, there would be some significant changes to realign boundaries to revised ward boundaries and ensure electorates are within the statutory range. Denton and Reddish would be broken up and a new constituency of Failsworth and Droylsden created, resulting in a major re-configuration of the Ashton-under-Lyne constituency. Other boundary changes would result in name changes as follows:[4][5]

Current name Proposed name
Blackley and Broughton Manchester Blackley
Bolton South East Bolton South and Walkden
Heywood and Middleton Heywood
Leigh Leigh South and Atherton
Manchester Gorton Manchester Longsight
Salford and Eccles Salford
Stalybridge and Hyde Denton and Hyde
Worsley and Eccles South Worsley and Eccles

The following constituencies are proposed:

Containing electoral wards in the borough of Bolton

Containing electoral wards in the borough of Bury

Containing electoral wards in the city of Manchester

Containing electoral wards in the borough of Oldham

Containing electoral wards in the borough of Rochdale

Containing electoral wards in the city of Salford

Containing electoral wards in the borough of Stockport

Containing electoral wards in the borough of Tameside

Containing electoral wards in the borough of Trafford

Containing electoral wards in the borough of Wigan

Revised proposals will be published in late 2022 and the final report will be submitted in June 2023.

Results history

Primary data source: House of Commons research briefing - General election results from 1918 to 2019[6]

2019

The number of votes cast for each political party who fielded candidates in constituencies comprising Greater Manchester in the 2019 general election were as follows:

Party Votes % Change from 2017 Seats Change from 2017
Labour 597,271 47.9% Decrease9.0% 18 Decrease5
Conservative 435,651 34.9% Increase2.4% 9 Increase5
Liberal Democrats 109,555 8.8% Increase2.7% 0 0
Brexit 68,462 5.5% new 0 0
Greens 29,642 2.4% Increase1.4% 0 0
Others 6,602 0.5% Decrease3.0% 0 0
Total 1,247,183 100.0 27

Percentage votes

Election year 1983 1987 1992 1997 2001 2005 2010 2015 2017 2019
Conservative 36.2 35.9 35.5 24.1 24.3 23.7 27.3 26.4 32.5 34.9
Labour 39.7 44.0 47.3 56.3 56.7 47.2 40.3 46.1 56.9 47.9
Liberal Democrat1 23.6 19.9 15.7 16.0 18.3 23.3 23.8 7.1 6.1 8.8
Green Party - * * * * * 0.6 3.5 1.0 2.4
UKIP - - - * * * 3.2 16.1 2.8 *
Brexit Party - - - - - - - - - 5.5
Other 0.5 0.1 1.6 3.5 3.7 5.8 4.8 0.8 0.7 0.5

11983 & 1987 - SDP-Liberal Alliance

* Included in Other

Seats

Election year 1983 1987 1992 1997 2001 2005 2010 2015 2017 2019
Conservative 11 10 9 2 1 1 2 5 4 9
Labour 18 19 20 25 25 23 22 22 23 18
Liberal Democrat1 1 1 1 1 2 4 3 0 0 0
Total 30 30 30 28 28 28 27 27 27 27

11983 & 1987 - SDP-Liberal Alliance

Maps

Historical representation by party

A cell marked → (with a different colour background to the preceding cell) indicates that the previous MP continued to sit under a new party name.

  Change UK   Conservative   Independent   Independent Labour   Labour   Liberal   Liberal Democrats

Constituency 1983 1987 88 1992 95 96 1997 99 2001 2005 05 2010 11 12 14 2015 15 2017 17 19 2019 22
Eccles Carter-Jones Lestor Stewart
Heywood and Middleton Callaghan Dobbin McInnes Clarkson
Leigh Cunliffe Burnham Platt Grundy
Denton and Reddish Bennett Gwynne
Bolton South East Young Iddon Qureshi
Ashton-under-Lyne Sheldon Heyes Rayner
Makerfield McGuire McCartney Fovargue
Manchester Blackley / Blackley and Broughton (2010) Eastham Stringer
Manchester Central Litherland Lloyd Powell
Manchester Gorton Kaufman Khan
Oldham C and Royton / Oldham E & Saddleworth (97) Lamond Davies Woolas Abrahams
Oldham West / Oldham West and Royton (1997) Meacher McMahon
Rochdale Smith Lynne Fitzsimons Rowen Danczuk Lloyd
Salford East / Salford (1997) / Salford & Eccles (2010) Orme Blears Long-Bailey
Stalybridge and Hyde Pendry Purnell Reynolds
Stretford / Stretford and Urmston (1997) Lloyd Hughes Green
Wigan Stott Turner Nandy
Worsley / Worsley and Eccles South (2010) Lewis Keeley
Manchester Wythenshawe / Wythenshawe & Sale E (97) Morris Goggins Kane
Manchester Withington Silvester Bradley Leech Smith
Stockport Favell Coffey Mishra
Bolton North East Thurnham Crausby Logan
Bury South Sumberg Lewis Wakeford
Bolton West Sackville Kelly Hilling Green
Bury North Burt Chaytor Nuttall Frith Daly
Hazel Grove Arnold Stunell Wragg
Cheadle Normanton Day Calton Hunter Robinson
Altrincham & Sale / Altrincham & Sale W (1997) Montgomery Brady
Davyhulme Churchill
Littleborough and Saddleworth Dickens Davies
Constituency 1983 1987 88 1992 95 96 1997 99 2001 2005 05 2010 11 12 14 2015 15 2017 17 19 2019 22

See also

Notes

  1. ^ BC denotes borough constituency, CC denotes county constituency.
  2. ^ The majority is the number of votes the winning candidate receives more than their nearest rival.

References

  1. ^ Baker, Carl; Uberoi, Elise; Cracknell, Richard (2020-01-28). "General Election 2019: full results and analysis". ((cite journal)): Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  2. ^ a b c "Constituencies A-Z - Election 2019". BBC News. Retrieved 2020-04-23.
  3. ^ "2023 Review | Boundary Commission for England". boundarycommissionforengland.independent.gov.uk. Retrieved 2021-10-07.
  4. ^ Green, Charlotte (2021-06-09). "Nearly every GM constituency boundaries could soon look radically different". Manchester Evening News. Retrieved 2021-10-17.
  5. ^ 2023 Review - North West Boundary Commission for England.
  6. ^ Watson, Christopher; Uberoi, Elise; Loft, Philip (2020-04-17). "General election results from 1918 to 2019". ((cite journal)): Cite journal requires |journal= (help)