The Rose Bowl was first televised in 1947 on W6XYZ,[1] an experimental station out of Los Angeles that would eventually become KTLA.[2]

Television

ESPN years (2011–present)

See also: List of ESPN College Football broadcast teams

Beginning with the 2010 season, ESPN (majority-owned by ABC's parent company, The Walt Disney Company) now broadcasts all the BCS/CFP games, including the Rose Bowl game.[3][4] The game is also broadcast nationally by ESPN Radio and by ESPN International for Latin America. In 2013, ESPN Deportes provided the first Spanish language telecast in the U.S. of the Rose Bowl Game.[5]

The Rose Bowl game contract with ESPN was extended on June 28, 2012, to 2026, for a reportedly $80 million per year.[6][7]

Date Network Play-by-play Color commentator(s) Sideline reporter(s)
January 1, 2022 ESPN Chris Fowler Kirk Herbstreit Holly Rowe and Tiffany Blackmon
January 1, 2021[8] Sean McDonough Todd Blackledge Todd McShay and Allison Williams
January 1, 2020 Chris Fowler Kirk Herbstreit Maria Taylor and Tom Rinaldi
January 1, 2019[9]
January 1, 2018[10][11]
January 2, 2017[12] Samantha Ponder and Tom Rinaldi
January 1, 2016[13] Brent Musburger Jesse Palmer Maria Taylor
January 1, 2015 Chris Fowler Kirk Herbstreit Heather Cox and Tom Rinaldi
January 1, 2014 Brent Musburger
January 1, 2013[14]
January 2, 2012 Erin Andrews[15]
January 1, 2011

ABC years (1989–2010)

Main articles: ABC college bowl game broadcasts and List of ESPN College Football on ABC personalities

From 1989 to 2010, the game was broadcast on ABC, usually at 2 p.m. PST; the 2005 edition was the first one broadcast in HDTV. The first 9-year contract in 1988 started at about $11 million, which is what NBC had been paying. The 2002 Rose Bowl was the first broadcast not set at the traditional 2:00pm West Coast time.[16] Beginning in 2007, FOX had the broadcast rights to the other Bowl Championship Series games, but the Rose Bowl, which negotiates its own television contract independent of the BCS, had agreed to keep the game on ABC.

Date Network Play-by-play Color commentator(s) Sideline reporter(s)
January 1, 2010[17] ABC[18] Brent Musburger[19] Kirk Herbstreit Lisa Salters
January 1, 2009[20][21]
January 1, 2008
January 1, 2007[22] Bob Davie and Kirk Herbstreit
January 4, 2006[23] Keith Jackson[24] Dan Fouts Todd Harris and Holly Rowe
January 1, 2005[25][26][27] Todd Harris
January 1, 2004[28]
January 1, 2003[29] Brent Musburger Gary Danielson Jack Arute
January 3, 2002 Keith Jackson Tim Brant Todd Harris and Lynn Swann
January 1, 2001[30] Todd Harris
January 1, 2000[31][32] Dan Fouts
January 1, 1999[33] Bob Griese Lynn Swann
January 1, 1998[34][35]
January 1, 1997[36][37][38] Brent Musburger Dick Vermeil Jack Arute
January 1, 1996[39][40][41][42] Keith Jackson Bob Griese Lynn Swann
January 2, 1995
January 1, 1994[43]
January 1, 1993[44][45][46] Brent Musburger Dick Vermeil
January 1, 1992[47][48] Keith Jackson Bob Griese
January 1, 1991
January 1, 1990 Mike Adamle and Jack Arute
January 2, 1989[49][50][51][52][53][54] Mike Adamle

NBC years (1952–88)

Main articles: NBC college bowl game broadcasts and List of NBC College Football personalities

The 1952 Rose Bowl, on NBC, was the first national telecast of a college football game.[55] The network broadcast both the Tournament of Roses Parade and the following game. The 1956 Rose Bowl has the highest TV rating of all college bowl games, watched by 41.1% of all people in the US with TV sets.[56] The 1962 game was the first college football game broadcast in color. Television ratings for the Rose Bowl declined as the number of bowl games increased.[56] The other bowl games also provided more compelling match-ups, with higher-ranked teams.[56] In 1988, NBC gave up the broadcast rights, as the television share dropped in 1987 below 20.[56]

Date Network Play-by-play Color commentator(s) Sideline reporter(s)
January 1, 1988[57][49][50][51][52][53] NBC Dick Enberg Merlin Olsen
January 1, 1987
January 1, 1986
January 1, 1985[58]
January 2, 1984
January 1, 1983[59]
January 1, 1982[60][61]
January 1, 1981
January 1, 1980 O. J. Simpson
January 1, 1979[62][63][64] Curt Gowdy John Brodie and O. J. Simpson None
January 2, 1978[65] John Brodie
January 1, 1977 Don Meredith
January 1, 1976 Al DeRogatis Ross Porter
January 1, 1975
January 1, 1974 Al DeRogatis
January 1, 1973
January 1, 1972
January 1, 1971 Kyle Rote None
January 1, 1970
January 1, 1969[66]
January 1, 1968 Paul Christman
January 2, 1967[67] Lindsey Nelson Terry Brennan
January 1, 1966
January 1, 1965 Ray Scott
January 1, 1964 Terry Brennan
January 1, 1963 Mel Allen None
January 1, 1962
January 2, 1961 Chick Hearn[68]
January 1, 1960
January 1, 1959
January 1, 1958[69]
January 1, 1957 [70] Lee Giroux
January 2, 1956 Sam Balter
January 1, 1955[71] Dick Danehe
January 1, 1954[72] Tom Harmon
January 1, 1953[73]
January 1, 1952[74][75] Jack Brickhouse

Radio

Date Network Play-by-play Color commentator(s) Sideline reporter(s)
January 1, 2022 ESPN Radio Tom Hart Jordan Rodgers Cole Cubelic
January 1, 2021 Joe Tessitore Andre Ware Holly Rowe
January 1, 2020 Bob Wischusen Dan Orlovsky Allison Williams
January 1, 2019 Dave Pasch Greg McElroy Tom Luginbill
January 1, 2018 Steve Levy Brian Griese Todd McShay
January 2, 2017 Dave Pasch Greg McElroy Molly McGrath
January 1, 2016 Brian Griese Tom Rinaldi
January 1, 2015 Sean McDonough Chris Spielman Todd McShay
January 1, 2014 Bill Rosinski David Norrie Joe Schad
January 1, 2013 Dave Pasch Brian Griese Jenn Brown
January 2, 2012 Chris Spielman Tom Rinaldi
January 1, 2011 Bill Rosinski David Norrie Joe Schad
January 1, 2010 Mike Tirico Jon Gruden Shelley Smith
January 1, 2009 David Norrie Erin Andrews
January 1, 2008 Dave Barnett Rod Gilmore
January 1, 2007 Sean McDonough Chris Spielman Todd Harris
January 4, 2006 Ron Franklin Bob Davie Dave Ryan
January 1, 2005 Sean McDonough Rod Gilmore none used
January 1, 2004 Mike Tirico Chris Spielman Matt Winer
January 1, 2003 Steve Levy Rod Gilmore Alex Flanagan
January 3, 2002 Ron Franklin Mike Gottfried Adrian Karsten
January 1, 2001 Charley Steiner[76] Bill Curry Holly Rowe
January 1, 2000 Rod Gilmore Rob Stone
January 1, 1999 Todd Christensen Holly Rowe
January 1, 1998 none used
January 1, 1997 NBC Radio[77] Joel Meyers[78] Jack Snow
January 1, 1996
January 2, 1995
January 1, 1994
January 1, 1993
January 1, 1992
January 1, 1991 Wayne Larrivee[79]
January 1, 1990 Joel Meyers[80]
January 2, 1989 Mel Proctor
January 1, 1988 Marty Glickman Stan White
January 1, 1987 Jack O'Rourke
January 1, 1986
January 1, 1985
January 2, 1984 Bob Costas
January 1, 1983 Jack O'Rourke[81] Rick Forzano
January 1, 1982
January 1, 1981
January 1, 1980 Bob Buck
January 1, 1979 Tom Kelly Bob Ufer*[82]
January 2, 1978 Barry Tompkins[83]
January 1, 1977 Tom Kelly
January 1, 1976 Marv Homan[84] Fred Hessler*
January 1, 1975 Tom Kelly Tom Hamlin*
January 1, 1974
January 1, 1973 Marv Homan*
January 1, 1972 Don Klein[85] Don Kramer*
January 1, 1971 Marv Homan*
January 1, 1970 Mike Walden Don Kramer*
January 1, 1969 Marv Homan*[86]
January 1, 1968 Hilliard Gates*[87]
January 2, 1967
January 1, 1966 Fred Hessler Bob Reynolds*
January 1, 1965 Bob Ufer Bob Blackburn*
January 1, 1964 Bob Wolff[88] Larry Stewart*
January 1, 1963 Tom Kelly[89] Mike Walden*[90]
January 1, 1962 Fred Hessler[91] Chick Hearn*[92]
January 2, 1961 Curt Gowdy Braven Dyer
January 1, 1960 Chick Hearn[93]
January 1, 1959 Bud Foster
January 1, 1958 Al Helfer[94] Keith Jackson
January 1, 1957 Braven Dyer[95]
January 2, 1956
January 1, 1955
January 1, 1954
January 1, 1953
January 1, 1952
January 1, 1951 CBS Radio Red Barber[96] Connie Desmond
January 2, 1950
January 1, 1949 Mel Allen[97] John Herrington
January 1, 1948 NBC Radio Bill Stern none used
January 1, 1947
January 1, 1946
January 1, 1945
January 1, 1944 Ken Carpenter[98]
January 1, 1943
January 1, 1942
January 1, 1941
January 1, 1940
January 2, 1939
January 1, 1938 Ronald Reagan
January 1, 1937 Don Wilson
January 1, 1936
January 1, 1935
January 1, 1934 Graham McNamee Carl Haverlin
January 2, 1933 Don Wilson[99] Ken Carpenter[100]
January 1, 1932 Graham McNamee Carl Haverlin[101][102]
January 1, 1931
January 1, 1930 Lloyd Yoder[103]
January 1, 1929 Bill Munday[104]
January 2, 1928 Graham McNamee[105][106][107]
January 1, 1927

Notes

See also

References

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