Oxfordshire in South East England has an area of 2,605 square kilometres and a population of 648,700. In England, the body responsible for designating Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs) is Natural England, which is responsible for protecting England's natural environment. Notification as an SSSI gives legal protection to the best sites for wildlife and geology.[1] As of 2020, there are 111 SSSIs in Oxfordshire, 78 of which have been designated for biological interest, 27 for geological interest, and 6 for both biological and geological interest.[2]

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Key

Sites

Site name Photograph B G Area[a] Public access Location[a] Other Map[b] Citation[c] Description
Alvescot Meadows Green tickY 3.0 hectares
(7.4 acres)
[3]
Alvescot
51°44′35″N 1°36′22″W / 51.743°N 1.606°W / 51.743; -1.606 (Alvescot Meadows)
SP 273 050
[3]
Map Citation
Appleton Lower Common
Green tickY 47.3 hectares
(117 acres)
[4]
FP Appleton
51°42′11″N 1°23′10″W / 51.703°N 1.386°W / 51.703; -1.386 (Appleton Lower Common)
SP 425 007
[4]
Map Citation The common has diverse broadleaved woodland on Oxford Clay with rides and glades. The shrub layer has a rich variety of species, such as primrose, goldilocks buttercup, early purple orchid, twayblade and wood anemone. Invertebrates include the rare club-tailed dragonfly.[5]
Ardley Cutting and Quarry
Green tickY Green tickY 40.1 hectares
(99 acres)
[6]
PP Ardley
51°56′28″N 1°13′23″W / 51.941°N 1.223°W / 51.941; -1.223 (Ardley Cutting and Quarry)
SP 535 272
[6]
BBOWT,[7] GCR,[8] SM[9] Map Citation The quarry and railway cutting exposes rocks dating to the Bathonian stage of the Middle Jurassic, about 167 million years ago. It is described by Natural England as of national importance for the understanding of the Jurassic Period in Britain as it allows correlation of rocks of the Oxford area to be correlated with those of the Midlands. The site has calcareous grassland with diverse vertebrates, including the internationally protected great crested newt.[10]
Ardley Trackways
Green tickY 63.6 hectares
(157 acres)
[11]
NO Bucknell
51°55′16″N 1°12′54″W / 51.921°N 1.215°W / 51.921; -1.215 (Ardley Trackways)
SP 541 250
[11]
GCR[12] Map Citation This site is internationally important because it has trackways created by a herd of sauropod (herbivorous) dinosaurs, together with several carnivorous theropods, along a shoreline dating to the Middle Jurassic, around 165 million years ago. These are the only such trackways in England, and one of the few dating to the Middle Jurassic in the world. The tracks throw light on the behaviour and gait of the dinosaours.[13]
Arncott Bridge Meadows
Green tickY 8.7 hectares
(21 acres)
[14]
NO Arncott
51°51′43″N 1°07′05″W / 51.862°N 1.118°W / 51.862; -1.118 (Arncott Bridge Meadows)
SP 608 185
[14]
Map Citation The site is adjacent to the River Ray and in its flood plain. It is old unimproved hay meadows which display medieval ridge and furrow features, showing that it has not been ploughed for centuries. It lies on Oxford Clay, and some areas are seasonally waterlogged. It has a wide variety of plants, including some rare ones, such as the nationally uncommon narrow-leaved water-dropwort, and the river bank also has unusual plants.[15]
Ashdown Park
Green tickY 9.3 hectares
(23 acres)
[16]
YES Ashbury
51°32′10″N 1°35′31″W / 51.536°N 1.592°W / 51.536; -1.592 (Ashdown Park)
SU 284 820
[16]
Map Citation The park has been designated an SSSI because of the lichens on its many sarsen boulders. These are in parkland which is heavily grazed to ensure that the lichens, which have taken centuries to grow, do not become shaded. Noteworthy species include Aspicilia caesiocinerea, Buellia saxorum, Candelariella coralliza, Rinodina atrocinerea and Parmelia loxodes.[17]
Aston Rowant
Green tickY 127.5 hectares
(315 acres)
[18]
YES Shirburn
51°39′47″N 0°57′00″W / 51.663°N 0.950°W / 51.663; -0.950 (Aston Rowant)
SU 727 966
[18]
NCR[19]
NNR[20]
SAC[21][22]
Map[d] Citation This site has beech woodland, scrub and chalk grassland. Unusual plants in the ground flora include wood barley, and the orchids Violet and white helleborine. There are several uncommon species of beetles and moths, and fifty breeding bird species.[23]
Aston Rowant Cutting
Green tickY 3.5 hectares
(8.6 acres)
[24]
YES Shirburn
51°39′43″N 0°56′35″W / 51.662°N 0.943°W / 51.662; -0.943 (Aston Rowant Cutting)
SU 732 964
[24]
GCR[25] Map Citation This cutting provides the best exposure in central England dating to the Coniacian stage of the Late Cretaceous, approximately 88 million years ago. It is part of the Upper Chalk succession, and at its base there is a fossil rich section which is important in defining the boundary between the Coniacian and the preceding Turonian stage.[26]
Aston Rowant Woods
Green tickY 209.9 hectares
(519 acres)
[27]
YES Aston Rowant
51°40′26″N 0°55′01″W / 51.674°N 0.917°W / 51.674; -0.917 (Aston Rowant Woods)
SU 750 978
[27]
NCR[28]
NNR[29]
SAC[30][31]
Map[d] Citation The site is described by Natural England as "of national importance as a large, unfragmented area of ancient semi-natural woodland characteristic of the Chilterns scarp". Flora include 52 species indicative of ancient woods, and there are over 100 species of fungi.[32]
Aston Upthorpe Downs
Green tickY 38.5 hectares
(95 acres)
[33]
YES Aston Upthorpe
51°32′53″N 1°13′05″W / 51.548°N 1.218°W / 51.548; -1.218 (Aston Upthorpe Downs)
SU 543 835
[33]
NCR[34] Map Citation This site is a set of dry valleys in the Berkshire Downs. Most of it is chalk grassland which has a rich variety of flora and fauna, and there are also areas of mixed woodland and juniper scrub. Flora include the nationally uncommon wild candytuft and the only population in the county of the rare pasque flower.[35]
Barrow Farm Fen Green tickY 6.7 hectares
(17 acres)
[36]
Marcham
51°40′26″N 1°19′30″W / 51.674°N 1.325°W / 51.674; -1.325 (Barrow Farm Fen)
SU 468 975
[36]
Map Citation
Bear, Oveys and Great Bottom Woods
Green tickY 64.1 hectares
(158 acres)
[37]
FP Rotherfield Peppard
51°32′38″N 0°59′42″W / 51.544°N 0.995°W / 51.544; -0.995 (Bear, Oveys and Great Bottom Woods)
SU 698 833
[37]
Map Citation This beech woodland has more than 40 species of ground flora which is commonly associated with ancient woods in southern Britain, including broad-leaved helleborine, southern wood-rush, yellow archangel, enchanter's nightshade, goldilocks buttercup, woodruff and the moss Leucobryum glaucum.[38]
Berins Hill Bank Green tickY 2.1 hectares
(5.2 acres)
[39]
Ipsden
51°33′40″N 1°03′32″W / 51.561°N 1.059°W / 51.561; -1.059 (Berins Hill Bank)
SU 653 851
[39]
Map Citation
Berrick Trench
Green tickY 2.1 hectares
(5.2 acres)
[40]
FP Swyncombe
51°35′17″N 0°59′02″W / 51.588°N 0.984°W / 51.588; -0.984 (Berrick Trench)
SU 705 882
[40]
Map Citation This is an ancient semi-natural beech wood on the slope of a dry valley in the Upper Chalk. There are many stools of ash, oak, beech, whitebeam, field maple and hazel. Woodland flowering plants include early purple orchid and early dog-violet.[41]
Bestmoor Green tickY 12.1 hectares
(30 acres)
[42]
North Aston
51°57′50″N 1°17′06″W / 51.964°N 1.285°W / 51.964; -1.285 (Bestmoor)
SP 492 297
[42]
Map Citation
Bix Bottom
Green tickY 102.3 hectares
(253 acres)
[43]
YES Swyncombe
51°35′06″N 0°58′05″W / 51.585°N 0.968°W / 51.585; -0.968 (Bix Bottom)
SU 716 879
[43]
BBOWT[44] Map Citation This site has ancient woods which are shown on a map of 1786, together with areas of grassy clearings and scrub. More than 500 species of vascular plant have been recorded, including 18 orchids and the rare meadow clary, which is listed in the British Red Data Book of Plants. There are more than 75 bird species and 650 fungi, including many which are nationally rare.[45]
Blenheim Park
Green tickY 224.3 hectares
(554 acres)
[46]
YES Woodstock
51°50′10″N 1°22′12″W / 51.836°N 1.370°W / 51.836; -1.370 (Blenheim Park)
SP 435 155
[46]
Map Citation The park was once an Anglo-Saxon chase and then a twelfth-century deer park. It now has some of the best areas of pasture and oak woodland in the country. The large lakes were created in the eighteenth century, and they are regionally important for breeding and wintering birds. Invertebrates include three rare beetles which are included in the British Red Data Book of Invertebrates, Rhizophagus oblongicollis, Plectophloeus nitidus and Aeletesatomarius.[47]
Bould Wood
Green tickY 58.2 hectares
(144 acres)
[48]
PP Chipping Norton
51°52′59″N 1°38′02″W / 51.883°N 1.634°W / 51.883; -1.634 (Bould Wood)
SP 253 206
[48]
BBOWT[49] Map Citation This site is mainly ancient semi-natural woodland, but it also has two streams, a pond and a wet meadow. The lower plant flora is diverse. Fungi include tricholoma toadstools and Cudoniella clavus, while there are lichens such as Cladonia polydactyla, Catillaria prasina and Graphis scripta.[50]
Brasenose Wood and Shotover Hill
Green tickY 109.2 hectares
(270 acres)
[51]
YES Headington
51°45′50″N 1°11′10″W / 51.764°N 1.186°W / 51.764; -1.186 (Brasenose Wood and Shotover Hill)
SP 563 056
[51]
NCR[51] Map Citation Most Brasenose Wood is a remnant of the ancient Shotover Forest, and it is one of the few woods which is still managed by the traditional method of coppice-with-standards. It has a very diverse ground flora, and 221 species of vascular plant have been recorded, including 46 which are characteristic of ancient woodland. Shotover hill has heath and unimproved grassland. It is described by Natural England as "of outstanding entomological interest", with many rare flies, bees, wasps and ants.[52]
Buckland Warren Green tickY 0.04 hectares
(0.099 acres)
[53]
NO Buckland
51°39′50″N 1°31′12″W / 51.664°N 1.520°W / 51.664; -1.520 (Buckland Warren)
SU 333 963
[53]
Map Citation This narrow strip of cultivated land between a wood and a golf course is designated an SSSI because it has a population of the nationally rare broad-leaved cudweed, which has been recorded at less than ten sites in Britain and is listed in the British Red Data Book of Vascular Plants. This annual plant requires disturbance of the soil by ploughing in early to mid October.[54]
Cassington Meadows Green tickY 6.9 hectares
(17 acres)
[55]
Witney
51°47′17″N 1°19′55″W / 51.788°N 1.332°W / 51.788; -1.332 (Cassington Meadows)
SP 462 101
[55]
SAC[56] Map Citation
Chimney Meadows
Green tickY 49.6 hectares
(123 acres)
[57]
PP Bampton
51°41′53″N 1°29′31″W / 51.698°N 1.492°W / 51.698; -1.492 (Chimney Meadows)
SP 352 000
[57]
BBOWT,[58] NNR[59] Map Citation This site, which consists of six botanically rich alluvial meadows, is bordered on the south by the River Thames. The meadows are intersected by ditches, most of which are covered in reed canary-grass. The most common grasses are crested dog's-tail, creeping bent, perennial rye-grass, hairy sedge and glaucous sedge.[60]
Chinnor Chalk Pit
Green tickY 20.4 hectares
(50 acres)
[61]
NO Chinnor
51°41′28″N 0°54′22″W / 51.691°N 0.906°W / 51.691; -0.906 (Chinnor Chalk Pit)
SU 757 997
[61]
GCR[62] Map Citation This site is described by Natural England as "important for its excellent exposures Totternhoe Stone", dating to the mid-Cenomanian stage of the Cretaceous period, around 100 million years ago. It has yielded many fossils of ammonites from the Lower and Middle Chalk.[63]
Chinnor Hill
Green tickY 26.8 hectares
(66 acres)
[64]
YES Chinnor
51°41′56″N 0°53′35″W / 51.699°N 0.893°W / 51.699; -0.893 (Chinnor Hill)
SP 766 006
[64]
BBOWT[65] Map Citation This hill has species-rich calcareous grassland, juniper scrub, which is an uncommon habitat, mixed scrub and woodland. More than 300 species of vascular plant have been recorded and 65 of birds. Many passerines breed in the scrub, and thrushes such as redwings and fieldfares feed on berries in the winter.[66]
Cothill Fen
Green tickY Green tickY 43.3 hectares
(107 acres)
[67]
PP Marcham
51°41′53″N 1°19′59″W / 51.698°N 1.333°W / 51.698; -1.333 (Cothill Fen)
SP 462 001
[67]
BBOWT,[68][69] GCR,[70] NCR,[71] NNR,[72] SAC[73] Map Citation This site has nationally rare calcareous fen and moss-rich mire habitats and a rich invertebrate fauna, including 25 species in the Red Data Book of Invertebrates. More than 330 vascular plants have been recorded. It is a nationally important site geologically because the sampling the peat gives a picture of the vegetation over the early Holocene, between 10,000 and 6,500 years ago.[74][75]
Culham Brake Green tickY 1.5 hectares
(3.7 acres)
[76]
Culham
51°39′50″N 1°16′01″W / 51.664°N 1.267°W / 51.664; -1.267 (Culham Brake)
SU 508 964
[76]
Map Citation
Cumnor Green tickY 0.2 hectares
(0.49 acres)
[77]
Oxford
51°43′34″N 1°20′02″W / 51.726°N 1.334°W / 51.726; -1.334 (Cumnor)
SP 461 032
[77]
GCR[78] Map Citation
Ditchley Road Quarry Green tickY 12.1 hectares
(30 acres)
[79]
Charlbury
51°52′34″N 1°27′54″W / 51.876°N 1.465°W / 51.876; -1.465 (Ditchley Road Quarry)
SP 369 199
[79]
GCR[80] Map Citation
Dry Sandford Pit
Green tickY Green tickY 4.2 hectares
(10 acres)
[81]
YES Abingdon
51°41′28″N 1°19′34″W / 51.691°N 1.326°W / 51.691; -1.326 (Dry Sandford Pit)
SU 467 994
[81]
BBOWT,[82] GCR[83] Map Citation This former sand quarry exposes a sequence of limestone rocks laid down in shallow coastal waters during the Oxfordian stage of the Jurassic, around 160 million years ago. It has many fossil ammonites. It has diverse calcareous habitats, including fen, grassland, scrub and heath. It is nationally important entomologically, especially for bees and wasps.[84]
Ducklington Mead
Green tickY 4.6 hectares
(11 acres)
[85]
NO Ducklington
51°45′58″N 1°28′30″W / 51.766°N 1.475°W / 51.766; -1.475 (Ducklington Mead)
SP 363 076
[85]
Map Citation This traditionally managed meadow has diverse flora, such as the rare and declining snake's-head fritillary. Flowering plants in drier areas include saw-wort, dropwort, lady's bedstraw and betony. There are also ditches with interesting wetland flora and an ancient hedge with a variety of shrubs.[86]
Fernham Meadows Green tickY 22.5 hectares
(56 acres)
[87]
Faringdon
51°36′50″N 1°34′37″W / 51.614°N 1.577°W / 51.614; -1.577 (Fernham Meadows)
SU 294 907
[87]
Map Citation
Frilford Heath, Ponds and Fens
Green tickY 108.8 hectares
(269 acres)
[88]
PP Abingdon
51°40′55″N 1°21′50″W / 51.682°N 1.364°W / 51.682; -1.364 (Frilford Heath, Ponds and Fens)
SU 441 983
[88]
BBOWT[89] Map Citation Natural England describes the acid grassland, heathland and valley fens of this site as unique in southern England. Over 400 vascular plants have been recorded, including some which are nationally rare. There are unusual insects such as the wasp Microdynerus exilis, which was only recognised as native to Britain in the late twentieth century, the red data book of threatened species fly cheilosia mutabalis, and the nationally uncommon Epistrophe diaphana.[90]
Glyme Valley
Green tickY 28.9 hectares
(71 acres)
[91]
PP Chipping Norton
51°55′48″N 1°30′36″W / 51.930°N 1.510°W / 51.930; -1.510 (Glyme Valley)
SP 338 258
[91]
BBOWT[92] Map Citation This linear site runs along two stretches of the valley of the River Glyme, with the upper area encompassing the river's headwaters. The diverse habitats include the river, ponds, fen, marshy grassland, limestone grassland, scrub and wet woodland. There is a large colony of meadow clary, a rare species which is listed in the British Red Data Book of Vascular Plants. There are several badger setts.[93]
Grafton Lock Meadow Green tickY 10.7 hectares
(26 acres)
[94]
Faringdon
51°41′17″N 1°36′22″W / 51.688°N 1.606°W / 51.688; -1.606 (Grafton Lock Meadow)
SU 273 989
[94]
Map Citation
Hackpen, Warren & Gramp's Hill Downs
Green tickY 71.4 hectares
(176 acres)
[95]
YES Childrey
51°33′36″N 1°29′10″W / 51.560°N 1.486°W / 51.560; -1.486 (Hackpen, Warren & Gramp's Hill Downs)
SU 357 847
[95]
SM[96] Map Citation This site consists of three adjacent areas of unimproved chalk grassland, which are managed by close grazing. Warren Down and Gramp's Hill Down are dominated by upright brome, and most of Hackpen Down by red fescue. Eleven species of butterfly have been recorded, including chalkhill blue, brown argus and marbled white.[97]
Harpsden Wood
Green tickY 29.4 hectares
(73 acres)
[98]
YES Henley-on-Thames
51°31′01″N 0°54′22″W / 51.517°N 0.906°W / 51.517; -0.906 (Harpsden Wood)
SU 760 804
[98]
Map Citation Most of this ancient wood is on acidic clay with flints, although some areas are on sandy clay or chalky silt. The acid soils have a sparse understorey but there is a diverse ground flora in the calcareous areas. Orchids include broad-leaved helleborine, green-flowered helleborine, bird's-nest orchid and narrow-lipped helleborine.[99]
Hartslock
Green tickY 41.8 hectares
(103 acres)
[100]
YES Goring-on-Thames
51°30′25″N 1°06′36″W / 51.507°N 1.110°W / 51.507; -1.110 (Hartslock)
SU 619 790
[100]
BBOWT,[101] SAC[102] Map Citation This site on the east bank of the River Thames has diverse semi-natural habitats, including species-rich chalk downland, ancient yew woodland, semi-natural broadleaved woodland, riverside fen and scrub. Hartslock Wood is one of the sites listed in 1915 by Charles Rothschild, the founder of the Wildlife Trusts, as "worthy of preservation". The wood has a variety of tree species including beech and yew, and there is a large colony of badgers.[103][104]
Highlands Farm Pit
Green tickY 0.6 hectares
(1.5 acres)
[105]
YES Henley-on-Thames
51°31′34″N 0°55′48″W / 51.526°N 0.930°W / 51.526; -0.930 (Highlands Farm Pit)
SU 743 813
[105]
GCR[106] Map Citation The site exposes gravel from the abandoned channel of the River Thames before the Anglian ice age pushed the river south around 450,000 years ago. It may date to the late Anglian Black Park Terrace which would make it the latest known exposure of the gravel floor of the old channel, and therefore of considerable importance. It has revealed large quantities of Palaeolithic flints, which are some of the earliest of their type known.[107] It is described by Natural England as a "crucial site".[108]
Holly Court Bank Green tickY 4.4 hectares
(11 acres)
[109]
Witney
51°49′59″N 1°26′28″W / 51.833°N 1.441°W / 51.833; -1.441 (Holly Court Bank)
SP 386 151
[109]
Map Citation
Holly Wood
Green tickY 25.6 hectares
(63 acres)
[110]
NO Oxford
51°47′10″N 1°09′00″W / 51.786°N 1.150°W / 51.786; -1.150 (Holly Wood)
SP 587 100
[110]
Map Citation This ancient wood is a small remnant of the medieval Royal Forest of Shotover. It is coppice with standards on Oxford Clay with a varied invertebrate fauna. There are several uncommon butterfiles such as the black hairstreak and purple emperor.[111]
Holton Wood
Green tickY 50.6 hectares
(125 acres)
[112]
FP Oxford
51°46′01″N 1°07′59″W / 51.767°N 1.133°W / 51.767; -1.133 (Holton Wood)
SP 599 079
[112]
Map Citation This ancient wood was formerly part of Bernwood Forest, which was a medieval hunting forest. It is semi-natural coppice with standards, with fine oak standards of varying ages. It has a rich invertebrate fauna, including 27 species of butterfly, with uncommon species such as white admiral and purple emperor.[113]
Hook Meadow and The Trap Grounds
Green tickY 11.9 hectares
(29 acres)
[114]
NO Oxford
51°46′37″N 1°16′41″W / 51.777°N 1.278°W / 51.777; -1.278 (Hook Meadow and The Trap Grounds)
SP 499 089
[114]
Map Citation These unimproved meadows in the floodplain of the River Thames are poorly drained and they have calcareous clay soils. The southern field is the most waterlogged, and its flora includes wetland species such as sharp-flowered rush, marsh arrow grass, common spike-rush and early marsh orchid.[115]
Hook Norton Cutting and Banks
Green tickY Green tickY 6.7 hectares
(17 acres)
[116]
PP Chipping Norton
51°58′55″N 1°28′48″W / 51.982°N 1.480°W / 51.982; -1.480 (Hook Norton Cutting and Banks)
SP 358 316
[116]
BBOWT,[117] GCR[118] Map Citation Hook Norton Cutting is a nature reserve along two stretches of a disused railway line separated by a tunnel. Most of it is unimproved calcareous grassland with a rich variety of flora. The site is notable for its bee species, including one which has only been recorded at three other sites in the country, Andrena bucephala. The cutting exposes rocks dating to the Middle Jurassic, around 167 million years ago, which are the type section of the Hook Norton Member of the Chipping Norton Formation. Hook Norton Bank is a steeply sloping limestone grassland by the River Swere.[119]
Horsehay Quarries
Green tickY 8.4 hectares
(21 acres)
[120]
NO Chipping Norton
51°56′28″N 1°20′17″W / 51.941°N 1.338°W / 51.941; -1.338 (Horsehay Quarries)
SP 456 272
[120]
GCR[121] Map Citation These quarries expose rocks dating to the Middle Jurassic period. The sequence runs from the Northampton Sand Formation of the Aalenian about 172 million years ago to the Taynton Limestone Formation of the Middle Bathonian around 167 million years ago.[122]
Hurst Hill
Green tickY Green tickY 20.6 hectares
(51 acres)
[123]
YES Cumnor
51°44′02″N 1°18′43″W / 51.734°N 1.312°W / 51.734; -1.312 (Hurst Hill)
SP 476 041
[123]
GCR[124] Map Citation The site is owned by All Souls College, Oxford,[125] and its mosses and liverworts have been monitored for more than fifty years. The hill is also important geologically. In 1879 a fossil of a Camptosaurus prestwichii, a large herbivorous dinosaur dating to the Upper Jurassic 143 million years ago, was found on the site.[126] The fossil belongs to a typically North African genus, and provides evidence of a land bridge across the proto-Atlantic in the Late Jurassic.[127]
Iffley Meadows
Green tickY 36.1 hectares
(89 acres)
[128]
YES Oxford
51°43′48″N 1°14′38″W / 51.730°N 1.244°W / 51.730; -1.244 (Iffley Meadows)
SP 523 037
[128]
BBOWT[129] Map Citation These flood meadows between two arms of the River Thames are traditionally managed for hay and pasture. A large part of the site is on clay, and it is enriched by silt each year when it is flooded. There is a rich grassland flora, with the outstanding feature being 89,000 snake's head fritillaries, which produce purple flowers in the spring. There is a network of old river channels, ditches and overgrown hedges.[129][130]
Kirtlington Quarry
Green tickY 3.1 hectares
(7.7 acres)
[131]
YES Kidlington
51°52′30″N 1°17′02″W / 51.875°N 1.284°W / 51.875; -1.284 (Kirtlington Quarry)
SP 494 199
[131]
GCR,[132][133] LNR[134] Map Citation Britain has the only five Middle Jurassic mammal sites in the world, and this disused quarry has yielded the richest and most diverse assemblage. It dates to the Upper Bathonian, around 150 million years ago. There are nine therian and prototherians species, together with a tritylodontid. There are also fossils of theropod dinosaurs, crocodilians, pterosaurs, fishes and many shark teeth.[135]
Knightsbridge Lane
Green tickY 1.7 hectares
(4.2 acres)
[136]
YES Watlington
51°40′01″N 1°06′14″W / 51.667°N 1.104°W / 51.667; -1.104 (Knightsbridge Lane)
SU 683 969
[136]
Map Citation This site consists of woodland on the sides of a minor road, which has approximately one tenth of the population in the country of a very rare plant, green hound's tongue. It is listed in the British Red Data Book of vascular plants, and it is found at only seven other locations in Britain. The species is often found in disturbed soils, and may have increased following the clearance of dead elm trees.[137]
Lamb and Flag Quarry Green tickY 0.2 hectares
(0.49 acres)
[138]
Abingdon
51°40′26″N 1°27′07″W / 51.674°N 1.452°W / 51.674; -1.452 (Lamb and Flag Quarry)
SU 380 974
[138]
GCR[139] Map Citation
Lambridge Wood
Green tickY 74.6 hectares
(184 acres)
[140]
YES Henley-on-Thames
51°33′04″N 0°56′13″W / 51.551°N 0.937°W / 51.551; -0.937 (Lambridge Wood)
SU 738 841
[140]
Map Citation Soil types in the wood vary from calcareous to very acid. The main trees are beech, and other trees include oak, ash and wych elm. The understorey in mainly bramble, and in some areas bracken.[141]
Langley's Lane Meadow Green tickY 3.3 hectares
(8.2 acres)
[142]
Witney
51°42′36″N 1°26′10″W / 51.710°N 1.436°W / 51.710; -1.436 (Langley's Lane Meadow)
SP 391 014
[142]
Map Citation
Little Tew Meadows
Green tickY 40.0 hectares
(99 acres)
[143]
FP Little Tew
51°57′00″N 1°27′11″W / 51.950°N 1.453°W / 51.950; -1.453 (Little Tew Meadows)
SP 377 281
[143]
Map Citation This site is composed of four adjoining unimproved meadows. One is used for hay while the rest are managed by cattle grazing. Two have prominent ridge and furrow dating to medieval farming practices. There are also extensive flushes and outcrops of limestone around the site of a former quarry.[144]
Little Wittenham
Green tickY 68.9 hectares
(170 acres)
[145]
YES Dorchester-on-Thames
51°37′52″N 1°10′30″W / 51.631°N 1.175°W / 51.631; -1.175 (Little Wittenham)
SU 572 928
[145]
SAC[146] Map Citation This site, which is managed by the Earth Trust, consists of woods, grassland, scrub and ponds on the slope of a hill next to the River Thames. Flora include the nationally scarce greater dodder, and there is a rich assemblage of amphibians, including one of the largest populations in the country of the great crested newt, which is a priority species of the Biodiversity action plan.[147]
Littlemore Railway Cutting
Green tickY 0.5 hectares
(1.2 acres)
[148]
NO Oxford
51°43′16″N 1°14′02″W / 51.721°N 1.234°W / 51.721; -1.234 (Littlemore Railway Cutting)
SP 530 027
[148]
GCR[149] Map Citation The cutting exposes limestone and clay laid down in mid-Oxfordian stage of the Late Jurassic, around 160 million years ago. The deposit is part of the Stanford Formation, and the clay appears to have been deposited in a channel between coral reefs which then covered the Oxford area.[150][151]
Littleworth Brick Pit Green tickY 1.5 hectares
(3.7 acres)
[152]
Oxford
51°44′38″N 1°08′53″W / 51.744°N 1.148°W / 51.744; -1.148 (Littleworth Brick Pit)
SP 589 054
[152]
GCR[153] Map Citation
Long Hanborough Gravel Pit Green tickY 3.7 hectares
(9.1 acres)
[154]
Witney
51°49′08″N 1°23′38″W / 51.819°N 1.394°W / 51.819; -1.394 (Long Hanborough Gravel Pit)
SP 419 136
[154]
GCR[155] Map Citation
Lye Valley
Green tickY 2.3 hectares
(5.7 acres)
[156]
YES Oxford
51°44′46″N 1°12′32″W / 51.746°N 1.209°W / 51.746; -1.209 (Lye Valley)
SP 547 056
[156]
LNR[157] Map Citation This a calcareous valley fen, which is a nationally rare and threatened habitat. It is drained by the Lye Brook. There is a variety of moss species, such as Drepanocladus revolvens and Campylium stellatum. Invertebrates include the nationally rare soldier fly, Vanoyia tenuicornis and the uncommon spiders, Xysticus ulmi and Anistea elegans.[158]
Lyehill Quarry
Green tickY 2.8 hectares
(6.9 acres)
[159]
NO Oxford
51°45′25″N 1°08′38″W / 51.757°N 1.144°W / 51.757; -1.144 (Lyehill Quarry)
SP 592 068
[159]
GCR[160] Map Citation This disused quarry exposes rocks dating to the Wheatley Limestone member of the Stanford Formation, approximately 160 million years ago during the Middle Jurassic. The deposits are limestones in an unstable reef substrate, and the only fossils are of oysters.[161]
Magdalen Grove Green tickY 0.4 hectares
(0.99 acres)
[162]
Oxford
51°45′18″N 1°15′00″W / 51.755°N 1.250°W / 51.755; -1.250 (Magdalen Grove)
SP 519 065
[162]
GCR[163] Map Citation
Magdalen Quarry Green tickY 0.3 hectares
(0.74 acres)
[164]
Oxford
51°45′36″N 1°12′11″W / 51.760°N 1.203°W / 51.760; -1.203 (Magdalen Quarry)
SP 551 071
[164]
GCR,[165] LNR[166] Map Citation
Middle Barton Fen Green tickY 11.6 hectares
(29 acres)
[167]
Chipping Norton
51°55′59″N 1°21′22″W / 51.933°N 1.356°W / 51.933; -1.356 (Middle Barton Fen)
SP 444 263
[167]
Map Citation
Moulsford Downs
Green tickY 13.6 hectares
(34 acres)
[168]
NO Moulsford
51°32′20″N 1°10′08″W / 51.539°N 1.169°W / 51.539; -1.169 (Moulsford Down)
SU 577 826
[168]
Map Citation This chalk grassland site on the Berkshire Downs has a rich wildlife. The diverse invertebrate fauna includes the uncommon robber-fly Leptarthrus brevirostris, the adonis blue butterfly, the juniper shield bug, the weevils Baris picicornis and seed beetle Phyllobius viridicollis, the leaf beetle Phyllotreta nodicornis and the Bruchus cisti.[169]
Murcott Meadows Green tickY 22.5 hectares
(56 acres)
[170]
Oxford
51°31′16″N 1°08′35″W / 51.521°N 1.143°W / 51.521; -1.143 (Murcott Meadows)
SP 592 139
[170]
BBOWT[171] Map Citation
Neithrop Fields Cutting
Green tickY 1.4 hectares
(3.5 acres)
[172]
YES Banbury
52°04′26″N 1°21′43″W / 52.074°N 1.362°W / 52.074; -1.362 (Neithrop Fields Cutting)
SP 438 419
[172]
GCR[173] Map Citation This site exhibits sections dating to the Early Jurassic around 190 to 180 million years ago. Its Middle Lias sediments show that it was adjacent to the "London landmass", which was then an island. The Upper Lias have a section rich in fossil ammonites. Natural England describes the site as a "key palaeogeographic and stratigraphic locality".[174]
New Marston Meadows
Green tickY 44.7 hectares
(110 acres)
[175]
PP Oxford
51°45′54″N 1°14′53″W / 51.765°N 1.248°W / 51.765; -1.248 (New Marston Meadows)
SP 520 076
[175]
Map Citation These meadows in the floodplain of the River Cherwell are traditionally managed for hay or by grazing. Some plants are typical of those on ancient meadows, such as common meadow-rue, pepper-saxifrage, devil's-bit scabious, adder's-tongue fern, smooth brome and meadow barley. Snake's head fritillary, which is nationally scarce, is also found at the site.[176]
Otmoor
Green tickY 213.0 hectares
(526 acres)
[177]
PP Murcott
51°49′12″N 1°10′08″W / 51.820°N 1.169°W / 51.820; -1.169 (Otmoor)
SP 574 138
[177]
Map Citation This site in the floodplain of the River Ray has herb-rich damp grassland, wet sedge, coarse grassland, woodland, pools and ditches. More than sixty species of bird breed on the site, such as curlew and lapwing, while wintering birds include teal, wigeon, snipe, golden plover and short-eared owl.[178]
Out Wood
Green tickY 19.2 hectares
(47 acres)
[179]
PP Woodstock
51°52′59″N 1°24′36″W / 51.883°N 1.410°W / 51.883; -1.410 (Out Wood)
SP 407 207
[179]
Map Citation This semi-natural wood is a surviving fragment of the medieval Royal Forest of Wychwood. It is overgrown coppice with standards, and the standards are oaks between 30 and 150 years old. Rides have a diverse ground flora, including meadow saffron, broad-leaved helleborine and greater butterfly orchid.[180]
Pishill Woods
Green tickY 42.8 hectares
(106 acres)
[181]
PP Henley-on-Thames
51°36′22″N 0°58′19″W / 51.606°N 0.972°W / 51.606; -0.972 (Pishill Woods)
SU 713 902
[181]
Map Citation These semi-natural woods have a rich ground flora, including 35 species associated with ancient woodland. The southern part is dominated by beech and oak coppice, whereas the north, which has been managed as high forest, has mainly mature beech trees, with smaller numbers of oak, ash, cherry, whitebeam, yew and wych elm. The southern part is common land.[182]
Pixey and Yarnton Meads
Green tickY 86.4 hectares
(213 acres)
[183]
PP Oxford
51°47′17″N 1°18′29″W / 51.788°N 1.308°W / 51.788; -1.308 (Pixey and Yarnton Meads)
SP 478 102
[183]
NCR,[184] SAC[56] Map Citation These are unimproved flood meadows on the bank of the River Thames. Their management is very well recorded, and it is known that they have been grazed and cut for hay for more than a thousand years, with the result that they are botanically rich, with more than 150 species. The site has been the subject of detailed botanical and hydrological research.[185]
Port Meadow with Wolvercote Common and Green
Green tickY 167.1 hectares
(413 acres)
[186]
PP Oxford
51°46′26″N 1°17′13″W / 51.774°N 1.287°W / 51.774; -1.287 (Port Meadow with Wolvercote Common and Green)
SP 493 086
[186]
NCR,[184] SAC,[56] SM[187] Map Citation This site consists of meadows in the floodplain of the River Thames. It is thought to have been grazed for over a thousand years and is a classic site for studying the effects of grazing on flora. There is a low diversity compared with neighbouring fields which are cut for hay, but 178 flowering plants have been recorded, including creeping marshwort, which is a Red Data Book species not found anywhere else in Britain.[188]
Priest's Hill Green tickY 1.0 hectare
(2.5 acres)
[189]
Henley-on-Thames
51°34′44″N 0°59′35″W / 51.579°N 0.993°W / 51.579; -0.993 (Priest's Hill)
SU 699 872
[189]
GCR[190] Map Citation
Reed Hill
Green tickY 14.0 hectares
(35 acres)
[191]
NO Witney
51°35′02″N 1°27′00″W / 51.584°N 1.450°W / 51.584; -1.450 (Reed Hill)
SP 380 174
[191]
Map Citation This sheltered dry valley has unimproved limestone grassland, secondary woodland and scrub. A spring at the northern end makes the ground there seasonally damp. Invertebrates include the small blue, Duke of Burgundy and dark green fritillary butterflies, the small shield bug Neotti-glossa pusilla, the beetle Oedemera lurida and the spider Hypsosinga pygmaea.[192]
Rock Edge
Green tickY 1.7 hectares
(4.2 acres)
[193]
YES Oxford
51°45′14″N 1°12′22″W / 51.754°N 1.206°W / 51.754; -1.206 (Rock Edge)
SP 549 064
[193]
GCR,[194] LNR[195] Map Citation This site exposes limestone rich in coral called Coral rag, laid down when the area was under a warm, shallow sea, similar to the Bahama Banks today. It is rich in fossils derived from the coral reefs. It dates to the Upper Jurassic, around 145 million years ago.[196]
Rushy Meadows
Green tickY 8.9 hectares
(22 acres)
[197]
NO Kidlington
51°49′26″N 1°18′11″W / 51.824°N 1.303°W / 51.824; -1.303 (Rushy Meadows)
SP 481 142
[197]
Map Citation This site consists of unimproved alluvial grasslands on the bank of the Oxford Canal. The species-rich sward is dominated by hard rush, and other plants include water avens, which is very uncommon in the Thames Basin, pepper saxifrage, devil's bit scabious, early marsh orchid and distant sedge.[198]
Salt Way, Ditchley
Green tickY 2.0 hectares
(4.9 acres)
[199]
YES Chipping Norton
51°52′23″N 1°26′38″W / 51.873°N 1.444°W / 51.873; -1.444 (Salt Way, Ditchley)
SP 384 195
[199]
LNR[200] Map Citation This is a stretch of an ancient track together with its species-rich grass verges and hedges. It has been designated an SSSI because it has the largest known British colony of the very rare downy woundwort, with more than 100 seedlings and 60 flowering stems. The plant is associated with hedges along Roman roads and ancient tracks on calcareous soils, and Salt Way may date to the Roman period.[201]
Sarsgrove Wood
Green tickY 41.9 hectares
(104 acres)
[202]
NO Chipping Norton
51°54′58″N 1°33′32″W / 51.916°N 1.559°W / 51.916; -1.559 (Sarsgrove Wood)
SP 304 243
[202]
Map Citation This ancient wood has a diverse geology resulting in a variety of soil conditions. A stream with poorly drained valley walls runs through the wood. More freely-drained areas have ground flora including early-purple orchid, primrose, bluebell, early dog-violet, sweet violet and narrow-leaved everlasting pea.[203]
Sharp's Hill Quarry
Green tickY 2.4 hectares
(5.9 acres)
[204]
NO Banbury
52°01′12″N 1°30′36″W / 52.020°N 1.510°W / 52.020; -1.510 (Sharp's Hill Quarry)
SP 337 358
[204]
GCR[205] Map Citation This is the type locality of the Sharp's Hill Formation. It is very fossiliferous and dates to the Bathonian stage of the Middle Jurassic, around 167 million years ago. It is very important for understanding the Bathonian succession in north Oxfordshire. Strata of the underlying Chipping Norton Formation are also present.[206][207]
Sheep's Banks
Green tickY 5.1 hectares
(13 acres)
[208]
NO Woodstock
51°53′06″N 1°21′32″W / 51.885°N 1.359°W / 51.885; -1.359 (Sheep's Banks)
SP 442 209
[208]
Map Citation This steeply sloping site is species-rich grassland which is traditionally managed. An ancient hedge runs the length of the site and a small stream runs along the downward side. Flora include five species of orchid, including bee, pyramidal and green-winged.[209]
Shellingford Crossroads Quarry
Green tickY 2.6 hectares
(6.4 acres)
[210]
YES Faringdon
51°38′42″N 1°31′48″W / 51.645°N 1.530°W / 51.645; -1.530 (Shellingford Crossroads Quarry)
SU 326 941
[210]
GCR[211] Map Citation This site exposes rocks of the Corallian Group, dating to the Oxfordian stage of the Late Jurassic, around 160 million years ago. It has many fossils of corals and reef-dwelling bivalves, and it is also important as it provides an example of the complexity of Oxfordian stratigraphy.[212]
Shipton-on-Cherwell and Whitehill Farm Quarries
Green tickY 27.0 hectares
(67 acres)
[213]
NO Kidlington
51°51′07″N 1°18′32″W / 51.852°N 1.309°W / 51.852; -1.309 (Shipton-on-Cherwell and Whitehill Farm Quarries)
SP 477 173
[213]
GCR[214][215] Map Citation This site exposes a lithostratigraphic succession dating to the Bathonian stage of the Middle Jurassic, around 167 million years ago. Shipton-on-Cherwell Quarry is described by Natural England as "of international importance as one of the best Upper Bathonian reptile sites known", and it has yielded type material for two species of crocodile. The quarry has also produced the type specimen of the dinosaur Dacentrurus vetustus.[216]
Shirburn Hill
Green tickY 63.7 hectares
(157 acres)
[217]
YES Watlington
51°39′11″N 0°58′05″W / 51.653°N 0.968°W / 51.653; -0.968 (Shirburn Hill)
SU 715 954
[217]
Map Citation The hill has chalk grassland, chalk heath, scrub and broadleaved woodland. Most grasslands in the Chilterns are maintained by stock, and the site is unusual in being cropped only by rabbits. Less closely grazed areas have taller grass with species such as false oat-grass, tor-grass and red fescue. There are large areas of hawthorn and buckthorn scrub.[218]
Sidling's Copse and College Pond Green tickY 21.7 hectares
(54 acres)
[219]
Oxford
51°46′52″N 1°12′00″W / 51.781°N 1.200°W / 51.781; -1.200 (Sidling's Copse and College Pond)
SP 553 094
[219]
BBOWT[220] Map Citation
Spartum Fen Green tickY 7.6 hectares
(19 acres)
[221]
Oxford
51°42′32″N 1°03′18″W / 51.709°N 1.055°W / 51.709; -1.055 (Spartum Fen)
SP 654 016
[221]
Map Citation
Stanton Great Wood
Green tickY 58.2 hectares
(144 acres)
[222]
NO Oxford
51°46′41″N 1°08′56″W / 51.778°N 1.149°W / 51.778; -1.149 (Stanton Great Wood)
SP 588 092
[222]
Map Citation This coppice with standards wood is traditionally managed. The dominant trees are pedunculate oak, ash and hazel, and there is a rich flora and diverse insects. Moths include the buff footman, poplar lutestring, blotched emerald, maiden's blush and the nationally uncommon small black arches.[223]
Stanton Harcourt Green tickY 0.5 hectares
(1.2 acres)
[224]
Witney
51°44′35″N 1°24′07″W / 51.743°N 1.402°W / 51.743; -1.402 (Stanton Harcourt)
SP 414 051
[224]
GCR[225] Map Citation
Stonesfield Common, Bottoms and Banks
Green tickY 26.9 hectares
(66 acres)
[226]
PP Witney
51°50′46″N 1°25′55″W / 51.846°N 1.432°W / 51.846; -1.432 (Stonesfield Common, Bottoms and Banks)
SP 392 165
[226]
Map Citation This site is composed of steeply sloping valleys and banks. Most of it is unimproved limestone grassland and scrub, but there is also an area of semi-natural ancient woodland. The grass in Stonesfield Common is mainly upright brome, and herbs include field scabious, greater knapweed, lady's bedstraw and pyramidal orchid.[227]
Stonesfield Slate Mines Green tickY 0.8 hectares
(2.0 acres)
[228]
Witney
51°51′00″N 1°26′38″W / 51.850°N 1.444°W / 51.850; -1.444 (Stonesfield Slate Mines)
SP 384 170
[228]
GCR[229][230][231][232][233] Map Citation
Stratton Audley Quarries Green tickY 8.6 hectares
(21 acres)
[234]
Bicester
51°55′12″N 1°07′41″W / 51.920°N 1.128°W / 51.920; -1.128 (Stratton Audley Quarries)
SP 601 250
[234]
GCR[235] Map Citation
Sturt Copse
Green tickY 6.5 hectares
(16 acres)
[236]
FP Witney
51°49′55″N 1°25′19″W / 51.832°N 1.422°W / 51.832; -1.422 (Sturt Copse)
SP 399 150
[236]
Map Citation This wood has many giant stools of coppiced of ash and wych elm trees, together with oaks, some of them pollarded. Most of the ground layer is dominated by dog's mercury, and there are uncommon plants such as yellow star-of-Bethlehem, Lathraea squamaria and hard shield-fern.[237]
Sugworth
Green tickY 0.6 hectares
(1.5 acres)
[238]
NO Abingdon
51°42′11″N 1°15′40″W / 51.703°N 1.261°W / 51.703; -1.261 (Sugworth)
SP 512 007
[238]
GCR[239] Map Citation This site dates to the Cromerian Stage, an interglacial over half a million years ago. It is a river channel cut into Kimmeridge Clay of the Late Jurassic, and it has rich deposits of vertebrates, ostracods, molluscs, beetles, plant remains and pollen.[240]
Swyncombe Downs
Green tickY 47.1 hectares
(116 acres)
[241]
PP Henley-on-Thames
51°36′54″N 1°01′30″W / 51.615°N 1.025°W / 51.615; -1.025 (Swyncombe Downs)
SU 676 911
[241]
SM[242] Map Citation This is an area of chalk grassland and scrub on the steep slopes of the Chiltern Hills. The site is described by Natural England as outstanding for its butterflies and moths. Butterflies include the silver-spotted skipper, which is nationally rare, grizzled skipper, grizzled skipper and dark green fritillary. There are day flying moths such as the cistus forester, chimney sweeper and wood tiger.[243]
Taynton Quarries Green tickY 40.0 hectares
(99 acres)
[244]
Taynton
51°49′59″N 1°39′36″W / 51.833°N 1.660°W / 51.833; -1.660 (Taynton Quarries)
SP 235 150
[244]
Map Citation
Tuckmill Meadows Green tickY 5.7 hectares
(14 acres)
[245]
Shrivenham
51°36′25″N 1°39′22″W / 51.607°N 1.656°W / 51.607; -1.656 (Tuckmill Meadows)
SU 239 899
[245]
LNR[246] Map Citation
Warren Bank
Green tickY 3.1 hectares
(7.7 acres)
[247]
YES Wallingford
51°33′58″N 1°03′32″W / 51.566°N 1.059°W / 51.566; -1.059 (Warren Bank)
SU 653 857
[247]
BBOWT[248] Map Citation This steeply sloping site has unimproved chalk grassland and scrub. There is a rich variety of flora, including horseshoe vetch, chalk milkwort and bee orchid. There are also many insects, with butterflies such as dark green fritillary and green hairstreak.[249]
Waterperry Wood
Green tickY 137.0 hectares
(339 acres)
[250]
YES Forest Hill
51°46′41″N 1°07′26″W / 51.778°N 1.124°W / 51.778; -1.124 (Waterperry Wood)
SP 605 092
[250]
NCR[251] Map Citation This wood has been designated an SSSI because it contains a diverse and important insect fauna, with many nationally uncommon and rare species. There are nineteen species of nationally uncommon hoverflies, including five which are listed in the British Red Data Book of Insects, many nationally uncommon beetles, thirty butterfly species and several rare moths.[252]
Watlington and Pyrton Hills
Green tickY 112.7 hectares
(278 acres)
[253]
PP Watlington
51°38′20″N 0°58′59″W / 51.639°N 0.983°W / 51.639; -0.983 (Watlington and Pyrton Hills)
SU 705 938
[253]
LNR[254] Map Citation This site has floristically diverse chalk grassland, chalk scrub, broadleaved woodland and yew woodland. Watlington Hill has short turf which is grazed by rabbits, with flowering plants including yellow-wort, dropwort, horseshoe vetch, squinancywort and the nationally rare candytuft.[255]
Wendlebury Meads and Mansmoor Closes
Green tickY 74.1 hectares
(183 acres)
[256]
FP Kidlington
51°51′11″N 1°11′24″W / 51.853°N 1.190°W / 51.853; -1.190 (Wendlebury Meads and Mansmoor Closes)
SP 561 175
[256]
BBOWT,[257] NCR[256] Map Citation Wendlebury Meads consists of several meadows which have been traditionally managed, and have complex and varied flora. It is one of the few Calcareous pastures to have survived agricultural improvements. Almost all show evidence of medieval ridge and furrow ploughing. Mansmoor Closes were enclosed before 1622, and are important from both a landscape and archaeological point of view. More than 160 plant species have been recorded on the site.[258]
Weston Fen
Green tickY 14.0 hectares
(35 acres)
[259]
FP Bicester
51°52′19″N 1°14′20″W / 51.872°N 1.239°W / 51.872; -1.239 (Weston Fen)
SP 525 195
[259]
Map Citation This site has diverse habitats, including a fast-flowing stream, species-rich, calcareous fen, willow carr, hazel woodland, limestone grassland and marshy grassland. There are several rare species of beetle, such as Sphaerius acaroides, Eubria palustris, Silis ruficollis and Agabus biguttatus.[260]
Westwell Gorse Green tickY 2.5 hectares
(6.2 acres)
[261]
Burford
51°48′00″N 1°41′02″W / 51.800°N 1.684°W / 51.800; -1.684 (Westwell Gorse)
SP 219 113
[261]
Map Citation
Whitecross Green and Oriel Woods
Green tickY 63.0 hectares
(156 acres)
[262]
YES Murcott
51°49′30″N 1°07′41″W / 51.825°N 1.128°W / 51.825; -1.128 (Whitecross Green and Oriel Woods)
SP 602 144
[262]
BBOWT[263] Map Citation These ancient woods are part of two former royal forests, Shotover and Bernwood. They are crossed by herb-rich and grassy rides, some of which are bordered by ditches, and there is also a pond and a marsh. Twenty-four species of butterfly have been recorded including the nationally rare black hairstreak.[264]
Whitehill Wood Green tickY 3.4 hectares
(8.4 acres)
[265]
Witney
51°50′10″N 1°26′02″W / 51.836°N 1.434°W / 51.836; -1.434 (Whitehill Wood)
SP 391 154
[265]
Map Citation
Whitehorse Hill
Green tickY Green tickY 99.0 hectares
(245 acres)
[266]
PP Faringdon
51°34′41″N 1°34′05″W / 51.578°N 1.568°W / 51.578; -1.568 (Whitehorse Hill)
SU 300 867
[266]
GCR,[267] SM[268] Map Citation This dry valley provides evidence of solifluction (slow sloping downhill due to repeated freezing and thawing) during at least one cold stage of the Pleistocene. The site has unimproved chalk grassland with a rich variety of flora, particularly in former chalk quarries. Grasses include upright brome and sheep’s fescue.[269]
Wicklesham and Coxwell Pits Green tickY 12.6 hectares
(31 acres)
[270]
Faringdon
51°38′42″N 1°34′44″W / 51.645°N 1.579°W / 51.645; -1.579 (Wicklesham and Coxwell Pits)
SU 292 941
[270]
GCR[271][272] Map Citation
Wolvercote Meadows
Green tickY 7.1 hectares
(18 acres)
[273]
PP Oxford
51°46′59″N 1°17′53″W / 51.783°N 1.298°W / 51.783; -1.298 (Wolvercote Meadows)
SP 485 096
[273]
SAC[56] Map Citation These meadows next to the River Thames are traditionally managed for pasture and hay, and they have a rich flora. The largest, which is called Great Baynham's Meadow, is used as pasture, and the other fields are managed for hay with grazing in the autumn. There are also watercourses which have many dragonflies.[274]
Woodeaton Quarry
Green tickY 7.3 hectares
(18 acres)
[275]
YES Oxford
51°48′22″N 1°13′41″W / 51.806°N 1.228°W / 51.806; -1.228 (Woodeaton Quarry)
SP 533 122
[275]
GCR[276] Map Citation This site exposes a sequence of rocks dating to the Middle Jurassic around 167 million years ago. It exhibits one of the most complete Bathonian sections in the county, and is described by Natural England as "of great palaeontological and sedimentological interest".[277]
Woodeaton Wood
Green tickY 14.0 hectares
(35 acres)
[278]
NO Oxford
51°47′46″N 1°13′05″W / 51.796°N 1.218°W / 51.796; -1.218 (Woodeaton Wood)
SP 540 111
[278]
Map Citation This coppice with standards on calcareous soil is a fragment of the ancient Shotover Forest. The ground layer has plants such as wood anemone, nettle-leaved bellflower, ransoms, goldilocks buttercup, early dog-violet and enchanter's nightshade.[279]
Wormsley Chalk Banks
Green tickY 14.8 hectares
(37 acres)
[280]
PP Stokenchurch
51°38′02″N 0°55′34″W / 51.634°N 0.926°W / 51.634; -0.926 (Wormsley Chalk Banks)
SU 744 934
[280]
Map[d] Citation The site has chalk grassland which is rich in both plant and invertebrate species which have sharply declined nationally. Flowers include bee and fly orchids, the latter of which is becoming scarce. Invertebrates include a variety of butterflies, harvest spiders and slowworms.[281]
Worsham Lane Green tickY 0.4 hectares
(0.99 acres)
[282]
Witney
51°47′02″N 1°33′22″W / 51.784°N 1.556°W / 51.784; -1.556 (Worsham Lane)
SP 307 096
[282]
Map Citation
Wychwood
Green tickY 501.7 hectares
(1,240 acres)
[283]
PP Witney
51°51′04″N 1°30′43″W / 51.851°N 1.512°W / 51.851; -1.512 (Wychwood)
SP 337 170
[283]
NCR,[284] NNR,[285] SM[286] Map Citation This remnant of a large royal hunting forest is the largest area of ancient broadleaved forest in the county, and the site also has limestone grassland and four marl lakes. More than 360 species of flowering plants and ferns have been recorded, together with 85 lichens and 60 mosses and liverworts. The invertebrate fauna is diverse, including 17 rare flies.[287]
Wytham Ditches and Flushes
Green tickY 2.7 hectares
(6.7 acres)
[288]
NO Wytham
51°47′06″N 1°19′37″W / 51.785°N 1.327°W / 51.785; -1.327 (Wytham Ditches and Flushes)
SP 465 098
[288]
Map Citation These ditches have a rich aquatic and fen flora. Uncommon wetland plants include greater water-parsnip, greater spearwort, water violet, brookweed, narrow-leaved water plantain and creeping jenny. There is also a small tussocky field which is kept partly waterlogged by flushes.[289]
Wytham Woods
Green tickY 423.8 hectares
(1,047 acres)
[290]
YES Wytham
51°46′08″N 1°19′48″W / 51.769°N 1.330°W / 51.769; -1.330 (Wytham Woods)
SP 463 080
[290]
NCR[290] Map Citation Habitats in this site, which formerly belonged to Abingdon Abbey, include ancient woodland and limestone grassland. Over 500 species of vascular plant have been recorded, and more data about the bird, mammal and invertebrate fauna, have probably been recorded about this site than any other in the country as a result of studies by Oxford University. More than 900 species of beetles, 580 of flies, 200 of spiders, 700 of bees, wasps and ant, 250 of true bugs and 27 of earthworms have been recorded.[291]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b The area and grid reference are taken from the "Details" page for each site on the Natural England database.[2]
  2. ^ The maps are provided by Natural England on the Magic Map website.
  3. ^ Citations are provided for each site by Natural England.
  4. ^ a b c This site is partly in Buckinghamshire.

References

  1. ^ Protected or designated areas, Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs and Natural England
  2. ^ a b Natural England, Sites of Special Scientific Interest, Search results for Oxfordshireshire
  3. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Alvescot Meadows". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  4. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Appleton Lower Common". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  5. ^ "Appleton Lower Common citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 4 April 2020.
  6. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Ardley Cutting and Quarry". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  7. ^ "Ardley Wood Quarry". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  8. ^ "Ardley Cuttings & Quarries (Bathonian)". Geological Conservation Review. Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  9. ^ "Ardley Wood moated ringwork". Historic England. Retrieved 30 March 2020.
  10. ^ "Ardley Cutting and Quarry citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 30 March 2020.
  11. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Ardley Trackways". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  12. ^ "Ardley Trackways (Jurassic - Cretaceous Reptilia)". Geological Conservation Review. Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  13. ^ "Ardley Trackways citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 2 June 2020.
  14. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Arncott Bridge Meadows". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  15. ^ "Arncott Bridge Meadows citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 13 February 2020.
  16. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Ashdown Park". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  17. ^ "Ashdown Park citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 4 April 2020.
  18. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Aston Rowant". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  19. ^ Ratcliffe, Derek A. (1977). A Nature Conservation Review. 2. Cambridge University Press. p. 121. ISBN 9780521214032.
  20. ^ "Aston Rowant citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived (PDF) from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 4 January 2016.
  21. ^ "Aston Rowant". Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Archived from the original on 16 March 2016. Retrieved 25 February 2016.
  22. ^ "Aston Rowant (SAC)". Natural England. Archived from the original on 5 March 2016. Retrieved 25 February 2016.
  23. ^ "Aston Rowant citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 13 February 2020.
  24. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Aston Rowant Cutting". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  25. ^ "Aston Rowant Cutting (Cenomanian, Turonian, Senonian, Maastrichtian)". Geological Conservation Review. Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  26. ^ "Aston Rowant Cutting citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 5 April 2020.
  27. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Aston Rowant Woods". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  28. ^ Ratcliffe, Derek A. (1977). A Nature Conservation Review. 2. Cambridge University Press. p. 53. ISBN 9780521214032.
  29. ^ Biodiversity Designations Background Paper. Wycombe District Council. June 2009. pp. 9, 10. Archived from the original on 1 March 2016. Retrieved 19 April 2016.
  30. ^ "Chilterns Beechwoods". Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Archived from the original on 16 March 2016. Retrieved 25 February 2016.
  31. ^ "Chilterns Beechwoods (SAC)". Natural England. Archived from the original on 5 March 2016. Retrieved 25 February 2016.
  32. ^ "Aston Rowant Woods citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 13 February 2020.
  33. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Aston Upthorpe Downs". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  34. ^ Ratcliffe, p. 121
  35. ^ "Aston Upthorpe Downs citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 4 March 2020.
  36. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Barrow Farm Fen". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  37. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Bear, Oveys and Great Bottom Woods". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  38. ^ "Bear, Oveys and Great Bottom Woods citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 5 April 2020.
  39. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Berins Hill Bank". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  40. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Berrick Trench". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  41. ^ "Berrick Trench citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 5 April 2020.
  42. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Bestmoor". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  43. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Bix Bottom". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  44. ^ "Warburg Nature Reserve". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 6 March 2020.
  45. ^ "Bix Bottom citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 10 March 2020.
  46. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Blenheim Park". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  47. ^ "Blenheim Park citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 12 March 2020.
  48. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Bould Wood". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  49. ^ "Foxholes". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  50. ^ "Bould Wood citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 2 June 2020.
  51. ^ a b c "Designated Sites View: Brasenose Wood and Shotover Hill". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  52. ^ "Brasenose Wood and Shotover Hill citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 12 March 2020.
  53. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Buckland Warren". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  54. ^ "Buckland Warren citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 5 April 2020.
  55. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Cassington Meadows". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  56. ^ a b c d "Designated Sites View: Oxford Meadows". Special Areas of Conservation. Natural England. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  57. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Chimney Meadows". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  58. ^ "Chimney Meadows". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  59. ^ "Designated Sites View: Chimney Meadows". National Nature Reserves. Natural England. Retrieved 25 February 2020.
  60. ^ "Chimney Meadows citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 13 March 2020.
  61. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Chinnor Chalk Pit". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  62. ^ "Chinnor Chalk Pit (Cenomanian, Turonian, Senonian, Maastrichtian)". Geological Conservation Review. Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  63. ^ "Chinnor Chalk Pit citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 22 March 2020.
  64. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Chinnor Hill". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  65. ^ "Chinnor Hill". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  66. ^ "Chinnor Hill citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 23 March 2020.
  67. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Cothill Fen". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  68. ^ "Lashford Lane Fen". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  69. ^ "Parsonage Moor". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  70. ^ "Cothill Fen (Quaternary of South Central England)". Geological Conservation Review. Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  71. ^ Ratcliffe, p. 208
  72. ^ "Designated Sites View: Cothill". National Nature Reserves. Natural England. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  73. ^ "Designated Sites View: Cothill Fen". Special Areas of Conservation. Natural England. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  74. ^ "Cothill Fen citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  75. ^ Day, S. P. (November 1991). "Post‐glacial vegetational history of the Oxford region". New Phytologist. 119 (3): 445–470. doi:10.1111/j.1469-8137.1991.tb00045.x. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  76. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Culham Brake". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  77. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Cumnor". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  78. ^ "Cumnor (Oxfordian)". Geological Conservation Review. Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  79. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Ditchley Road Quarry". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  80. ^ "Ditchley Road Quarry (Bathonian)". Geological Conservation Review. Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  81. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Dry Sandford Pit". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  82. ^ "Dry Sandford Pit". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  83. ^ "Dry Sandford Pit (Oxfordian)". Geological Conservation Review. Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  84. ^ "Dry Sandford Pit citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 23 March 2020.
  85. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Ducklington Mead". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  86. ^ "Ducklington Mead citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 3 June 2020.
  87. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Fernham Meadows". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  88. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Frilford Heath, Ponds and Fens". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  89. ^ "Hitchcopse Pit". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  90. ^ "Frilford Heath, Ponds and Fens citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 13 February 2020.
  91. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Glyme Valley". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  92. ^ "Glyme Valley". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  93. ^ "Glyme Valley citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 6 April 2020.
  94. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Grafton Lock Meadow". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  95. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Hackpen, Warren & Gramp's Hill Downs". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  96. ^ "Hackpen Hill bowl barrow 525m south of Sincombe Farm". Historic England. Retrieved 8 April 2020.
  97. ^ "Hackpen, Warren & Gramp's Hill Downs citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 24 March 2020.
  98. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Harpsden Wood". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  99. ^ "Harpsden Wood citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 24 March 2020.
  100. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Hartslock". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  101. ^ "Hartslock". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  102. ^ "Designated Sites View: Hartslock Wood". Special Areas of Conservation. Natural England. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  103. ^ "Hartslock citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 25 March 2020.
  104. ^ "The Rothschild Reserves". The Wildlife Trusts. Retrieved 25 March 2020.
  105. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Highlands Farm Pit". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  106. ^ "Highlands Farm Pit (Quaternary of the Thames)". Geological Conservation Review. Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  107. ^ "Key geological sites: South Oxfordshire". Oxford Geology Group. Retrieved 10 April 2016.
  108. ^ "Highlands Farm Pit citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 13 February 2020.
  109. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Holly Court Bank". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  110. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Holly Wood". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  111. ^ "Holly Wood citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 6 April 2020.
  112. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Holton Wood". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  113. ^ "Holton Wood citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 6 April 2020.
  114. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Hook Meadow and The Trap Grounds". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  115. ^ "Hook Meadow and The Trap Grounds citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 26 March 2020.
  116. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Hook Norton Cutting and Banks". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  117. ^ "Hook Norton Cutting". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  118. ^ "Hook Norton (Bathonian)". Geological Conservation Review. Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  119. ^ "Hook Norton Cutting and Banks citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 26 March 2020.
  120. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Horsehay Quarries". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  121. ^ "Horsehay Quarry (Bathonian)". Geological Conservation Review. Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  122. ^ "Horsehay Quarries citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 6 April 2020.
  123. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Hurst Hill". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  124. ^ "Chawley Brickpits, Cumnor Hurst (Jurassic - Cretaceous Reptilia)". Geological Conservation Review. Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  125. ^ Hopkins, Gerard Manley (2015). The Collected Works of Gerard Manley Hopkins. Oxford University Press. p. 371, n. 625.
  126. ^ "Dinosaurs in the Museum" (PDF). Oxford University Museum of Natural History. Retrieved 6 April 2020.
  127. ^ "Hurst Hill citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 6 April 2020.
  128. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Iffley Meadows". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  129. ^ a b "Iffley Meadows". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  130. ^ "Iffley Meadows citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 26 March 2020.
  131. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Kirtlington Quarry". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  132. ^ "Kirtlington (Jurassic - Cretaceous Reptilia)". Geological Conservation Review. Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  133. ^ "Kirtlington Old Cement Works Quarry (Mesozoic - Tertiary Fish/Amphibia)". Geological Conservation Review. Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  134. ^ "Designated Sites View: Kirtlington Quarry". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  135. ^ "Kirtlington Quarry citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 27 March 2020.
  136. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Knightsbridge Lane". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  137. ^ "Knightsbridge Lane citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 17 March 2020.
  138. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Lamb and Flag Quarry". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  139. ^ "Lamb & Flag (Oxfordian)". Geological Conservation Review. Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  140. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Lambridge Wood". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  141. ^ "Lambridge Wood citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 13 February 2020.
  142. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Langley's Lane Meadow". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  143. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Little Tew Meadows". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  144. ^ "Little Tew Meadows citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 3 June 2020.
  145. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Little Wittenham". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  146. ^ "Designated Sites View: Little Wittenham". Special Areas of Conservation. Natural England. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  147. ^ "Little Wittenham citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 6 April 2020.
  148. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Littlemore Railway Cutting". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  149. ^ "Littlemore (Oxfordian)". Geological Conservation Review. Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  150. ^ "Littlemore Railway Cutting citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 6 April 2020.
  151. ^ "Stanford Formation". British Geological Survey. Retrieved 6 April 2020.
  152. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Littleworth Brick Pit". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  153. ^ "Littleworth Brick Pit (Kimmeridgian)". Geological Conservation Review. Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  154. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Long Hanborough Gravel Pit". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  155. ^ "Long Hanborough Gravel Pit (Quaternary of the Thames)". Geological Conservation Review. Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  156. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Lye Valley". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  157. ^ "Designated Sites View: Lye Valley". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  158. ^ "Lye Valley citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 27 March 2020.
  159. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Lyehill Quarry". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  160. ^ "Lyehill (Oxfordian)". Geological Conservation Review. Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  161. ^ "Lyehill Quarry citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 6 April 2020.
  162. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Magdalen Grove". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  163. ^ "Magdalen Grove Deer Park (Quaternary of the Thames)". Geological Conservation Review. Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  164. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Magdalen Quarry". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  165. ^ "Magdalen Pit (Oxfordian)". Geological Conservation Review. Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  166. ^ "Designated Sites View: Magdalen Quarry". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  167. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Middle Barton Fen". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  168. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Moulsford Down". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  169. ^ "Moulsford Downs citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 6 April 2020.
  170. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Murcott Meadows". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  171. ^ "Asham Meads". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 6 May 2016.
  172. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Neithrop Fields Cutting". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  173. ^ "Neithrop Fields Cutting (Hettangian, Sinemurian and Pliensbachian)". Geological Conservation Review. Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  174. ^ "Neithrop Fields Cutting citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 6 April 2020.
  175. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: New Marston Meadows". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  176. ^ "New Marston Meadows citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 6 April 2020.
  177. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Otmoor". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  178. ^ "Otmoor citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 28 March 2020.
  179. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Out Wood". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  180. ^ "Out Wood citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 6 April 2020.
  181. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Pishill Woods". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  182. ^ "Pishill Woods citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 7 April 2020.
  183. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Pixey and Yarnton Meads". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  184. ^ a b Ratcliffe, p. 129
  185. ^ "Pixey and Yarnton Meads citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 7 April 2020.
  186. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Port Meadow with Wolvercote Common and Green". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  187. ^ "Godstow Abbey: a Benedictine nunnery, associated earthworks, leats and bridge, immediately south of Godstow Bridge". Historic England. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  188. ^ "Port Meadow with Wolvercote Common and Green citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 7 April 2020.
  189. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Priest's Hill". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  190. ^ "Priest's Hill, Nettlebed (Quaternary of the Thames)". Geological Conservation Review. Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  191. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Reed Hill". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  192. ^ "Reed Hill citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 7 April 2020.
  193. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Rock Edge". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  194. ^ "Cross Roads Quarry (Oxfordian)". Geological Conservation Review. Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  195. ^ "Designated Sites View: Rock Edge". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  196. ^ "Rock Edge citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 28 March 2020.
  197. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Rushy Meadows". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  198. ^ "Rushy Meadows citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 16 March 2020.
  199. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Salt Way, Ditchley". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  200. ^ "Designated Sites View: Saltway". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  201. ^ "Salt Way, Ditchley citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 7 April 2020.
  202. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Sarsgrove Wood". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  203. ^ "Sarsgrove Wood citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 28 March 2020.
  204. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Sharp's Hill Quarry". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  205. ^ "Sharps Hill (Bathonian)". Geological Conservation Review. Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  206. ^ "Sharp's Hill Quarry citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 3 June 2020.
  207. ^ "The BGS Lexicon of Named Rock Units — Result Details: Sharp's Hill Formation". British Geological Survey. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  208. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Sheep's Banks". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
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Sources

Coordinates: 51°45′N 1°17′W / 51.75°N 1.28°W / 51.75; -1.28