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1800–1896

1840

1844

1848

1852

1856

1860

1864

1868

1872

1876

1884

1888

1892

1896

1900–1996

1900

1904

1908

1912

1916

1920

1924

1928

1932

1936

1940

1944

1948

1952

1956

1960

1964

1968

1972

1976

1980

1984

1988

1992

1996

2000–present

2000

2004

Republican Party candidates

Democratic Party candidates

Libertarian Party candidates

2008

Democratic Party candidates

Republican Party candidates

Independent candidates

Libertarian Party candidates

2012

Democratic Party candidates

Republican Party candidates

Libertarian Party candidates

Green Party candidates

Constitution Party candidates

2016

Republican Party candidates

Democratic Party candidates

Libertarian Party candidates

Green Party candidates

Independents

2020

Democratic Party candidates

Republican Party candidates

Libertarian Party candidates

Green Party candidates

Constitution Party candidates

2024

Democratic Party candidates

Republican Party candidates

Libertarian Party candidates

See also

References

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  2. ^ "American Political Prints 1766-1876". loc.harpweek.com. Archived from the original on August 8, 2016.
  3. ^ "54° 40' or Fight". ushistory.org. Archived from the original on July 20, 2017.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g "Presidential Campaign Slogans". presidentsusa.net. Archived from the original on February 8, 2014.
  5. ^ Berliner, David C. (June 3, 1973). "Frelinghuysen: Moderate Republican". The New York Times. New York, NY. Archived from the original on May 10, 2018.
  6. ^ Heritage-Slater Political Memorabilia and Americana Auction Catalog #625. Heritage Numismatic Auctions, Inc.: Dallas, TX. 2005. p. 179. ISBN 9781932899672.
  7. ^ "Slogans in Presidential Campaigns" (PDF). The Center for Civic Education. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 19, 2013. Retrieved October 18, 2013.
  8. ^ Conradt, Stacy (October 8, 2008). "The Quick 10: 10 Campaign Slogans of the Past". Mental Floss. Archived from the original on June 24, 2016. Retrieved May 27, 2016.
  9. ^ "Posters and Election Propaganda: "America First" – Communication Management and Design – Ithaca College". ithaca.edu. Archived from the original on August 31, 2017.
  10. ^ "One Hundred Years Ago, Eugene Debs Gave An Anti-War Speech That Landed Him in Prison". Common Dreams. Retrieved January 25, 2019.
  11. ^ Gallery 5: The Logical Candidate Archived October 6, 2017, at the Wayback Machine, The Hoover Library & Museum.
  12. ^ A Chicken for Every Pot, U.S. government archive.
  13. ^ ""The Buck Stops Here" Desk sign | Harry S. Truman". trumanlibrary.gov. Retrieved October 12, 2020.
  14. ^ "1960". July 5, 2011.
  15. ^ "1964 redux: The stakes are too high for you to stay at home". May 12, 2016.
  16. ^ Nichols, John (December 11, 2005). "Eugene McCarthy's Lyrical Politics". The Nation (blog). Archived from the original on March 7, 2016. Retrieved March 6, 2016.
  17. ^ Nixon Now (Nixon, 1972) Archived October 11, 2012, at the Wayback Machine, Museum of the Moving Image (2012).
  18. ^ Nichols, John (October 19, 2012). "The Genius of McGovern's 'Come Home, America' Vision". The Nation. New York, NY. Archived from the original on October 20, 2016.
  19. ^ Dudden, Arthur Power (May 10, 1989). American Humor. Oxford University Press. ISBN 9780195050547 – via Google Books.
  20. ^ a b "Will Rabbe, Producer, Journalist & Historian – Blog – Most Underrated Political Slogan: "They Can't Lick Our Dick"". willrabbe.com. Retrieved April 22, 2017.
  21. ^ Tumulty, Karen (January 18, 2017). "How Donald Trump came up with 'Make America Great Again'". The Washington Post. Retrieved July 13, 2019.
  22. ^ Smith, Ben (January 3, 2008). "Undecided: Hillary keeps shifting slogans". Politico. Archived from the original on March 2, 2016. Retrieved February 19, 2016.
  23. ^ Montopoli, Brian (June 17, 2008). "McCain's Slogan: "Reform, Prosperity and Peace"". CBS News. Archived from the original on March 7, 2016. Retrieved March 6, 2016.
  24. ^ Hollywood double takes (#3) "Hollywood double takes: Actors who take on famous faces - NY Daily News". New York Daily News. Archived from the original on December 24, 2011. Retrieved January 3, 2012.
  25. ^ Sweeney, Dan (December 28, 2015). "Jeb comes to South Florida, sans exclamation mark". Sun-Sentinel. Archived from the original on March 2, 2016. Retrieved December 30, 2015.
  26. ^ Killough, Ashley (January 6, 2016). "Jeb Bush, the 'joyful tortoise,' gives out tiny toy turtles on trail". CNN. Archived from the original on August 30, 2017.
  27. ^ "2016 Presidential Campaign Slogan Survey". tagline guru. Archived from the original on October 29, 2015. Retrieved October 19, 2015.
  28. ^ Allen, Mike (April 6, 2015). "Rand Paul unveils populist, anti-establishment slogan". Politico. Archived from the original on December 28, 2015. Retrieved December 30, 2015.
  29. ^ Nelson, Angela (December 26, 2015). "Huckabee's Hope is From "Tree Town" to Higher Ground". KIOW. Pilot Knob Broadcasting. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved December 30, 2015.
  30. ^ Ashley Killough (July 3, 2015). "Designers critique campaign logos". CNN. Retrieved October 1, 2018.
  31. ^ "Campaign 2016: Carly Fiorina, GOP Presidential Candidate". Council on Foreign Relations. Retrieved October 1, 2018.
  32. ^ The Best & Worst 2016 Campaign Logos, Bloomberg L.P., June 5, 2015, archived from the original on December 21, 2021, retrieved October 1, 2018
  33. ^ Benen, Steve (July 26, 2016). "Michelle Obama: 'When they go low, we go high'". MSNBC. Archived from the original on October 18, 2016. Retrieved October 19, 2016.