Flag of an Armylieutenant general
Flag of an Army
lieutenant general

This is a list of lieutenant generals in the United States Army from 2000 to 2009. The rank of lieutenant general (or three-star general) is the second-highest rank normally achievable in the U.S. Army, and the first to have a specified number of appointments set by statute. It ranks above major general (two-star general) and below general (four-star general).

There have been 131 lieutenant generals in the United States Army from 2000 to 2009, 27 of whom were promoted to four-star general. All 131 achieved that rank while on active duty in the U.S. Army. Lieutenant generals entered the Army via several paths: 57 were commissioned via the U.S. Military Academy (USMA), 53 via Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) at a civilian university, 13 via Officer Candidate School (OCS), 7 via ROTC at a senior military college, and one via direct commission (direct).

List of generals

Entries in the following list of lieutenant generals are indexed by the numerical order in which each officer was promoted to that rank while on active duty, or by an asterisk (*) if the officer did not serve in that rank while on active duty in the U.S. Army or was promoted to four-star rank while on active duty in the U.S. Army. Each entry lists the general's name, date of rank,[a] active-duty positions held while serving at three-star rank,[b] number of years of active-duty service at three-star rank (Yrs),[c] year commissioned and source of commission,[d] number of years in commission when promoted to three-star rank (YC),[e] and other biographical notes.[f]

List of U.S. Army lieutenant generals from 2000 to 2009
# Name Photo Date of rank[a] Position[b] Yrs[c] Commission[d] YC[e] Notes[f]
1 Timothy J. Maude
Timothy J. Maude biographical photograph.jpg
16 May 2000   1 1967 (OCS) 33 (1947–2001) Highest ranking military officer killed by foreign action since Simon Bolivar Buckner Jr., and highest ranking officer killed in the September 11 attacks.
* Dan K. McNeill
Lt. Gen. Dan K. McNeill.jpg
27 Jun 2000   4 1968 (ROTC) 32 (1946–        )[g] Promoted to general, 1 Jul 2004.
2 Robert W. Noonan Jr.
Lt. Gen. Robert W. Noonan Jr.jpg
27 Jun 2000  
  • Deputy Chief of Staff, Intelligence, Army Staff (DCS G-2), 2000–2003.
3 1968 (ROTC) 32
3 Peter M. Cuviello
Brig. Gen. Peter M. Cuviello, USA (Uncovered).jpg
27 Jun 2000   3 1969 (ROTC) 31
4 Paul T. Mikolashek
Lt. Gen. Paul T. Mikolashek.jpg
29 Jun 2000[2] 4 1969 (ROTC) 31 (1947–        )
5 Freddy E. McFarren
LTG Freddy E. McFarren, Commander U.S. Army North.jpg
12 Aug 2000   3 1966 (USMA) 34 (1943–        )
6 James B. Peake
Portrait of U.S. Army Lt. Gen. James B. Peake The Surgeon General-Commander, U.S. Army Medical Command.jpg
7 Sep 2000   4 1966 (USMA) 34 (1944–        ) U.S. Secretary of Veterans Affairs, 2007–2009.[3]
7 Daniel R. Zanini
Lt. Gen. Daniel R. Zanini (2).jpg
28 Sep 2000   2 1966 (OCS) 34 (1946–        )
* John P. Abizaid
Portrait of U.S. Army LT. Gen. John P. Abizaid.jpg
2 Oct 2000[4] 3 1973 (USMA) 27 (1951–        )[h] Promoted to general, 27 Jun 2003. U.S. Ambassador to Saudi Arabia, 2019–2021. Father of intelligence official Christine Abizaid.
8 Charles S. Mahan Jr.
Lieutenant General Charles S. Mahan, Jr., USA (uncovered).jpg
6 Oct 2000[6]
  • Deputy Chief of Staff, Logistics, Army Staff (DCS G-4),[i] 2000–2003.
3 1968 (USMA) 32 (1946–        )
* Bryan D. Brown
GEN Bryan Brown official portrait.jpg
11 Oct 2000[8] 3 1970 (OCS) 30 (1948–        )[h] Promoted to general, 25 Aug 2003.
9 Robert B. Flowers
Robert B Flowers.jpg
23 Oct 2000   4 1969 (VMI) 31 (1947–        )
10 Joseph K. Kellogg Jr.
Portrait of U.S. Army Lt. Gen. Joseph K. Kellogg.jpg
24 Oct 2000  
  • Director, Command, Control, Communications and Computers/Cyber, Joint Staff, J6, 2000–2003.
3 1967 (ROTC) 33 (1944–        ) National Security Advisor to the U.S. Vice President, 2018–2021.[9]
11 Joseph M. Cosumano Jr.
Joseph M Cosumano.jpg
30 Apr 2001   2 1968 (ROTC) 33 (1946–        )
12 Roy E. Beauchamp
Lt. Gen. Roy E. Beauchamp.jpg
24 May 2001   1 1966 (OCS) 35 (1945–        )
13 Roger C. Schultz
Roger C. Schultz.jpg
24 May 2001   4 1967 (OCS) 34 (1945–        ) First Army National Guard officer to achieve the rank of lieutenant general.
14 William J. Lennox Jr.
Lt. Gen. William J. Lennox Jr.jpg
8 Jun 2001[10] 5 1971 (USMA) 30 (1949–        ) President, Saint Leo University, 2015–2018.[11]
15 Thomas J. Plewes
Lt. Gen. Thomas J. Plewes.jpg
13 Jun 2001   1 1967 (OCS) 34 (1940–        ) First Army Reserve officer to achieve the rank of lieutenant general.
* Benjamin S. Griffin
Maj Gen Benjamin S. Griffin.jpg
29 Jun 2001   3 1970 (OCS) 31 (1946–        ) Promoted to general, 5 Nov 2004.
* William S. Wallace
LTGWilliam Wallace.jpg
18 Jul 2001   4 1969 (USMA) 32 (1946–        ) Promoted to general, 13 Oct 2005.
* David D. McKiernan
Lt. Gen. David D. McKiernan ARCENT.jpg
27 Jul 2001   4 1972 (ROTC) 29 (1950–        )[g] Promoted to general, 14 Dec 2005.
* Burwell B. Bell III
Lt. Gen. Burwell B. Bell III.jpg
14 Aug 2001[12] 1 1969 (ROTC) 32 (1947–        )[k] Promoted to general, 3 Dec 2002.
16 John B. Sylvester
Lt. Gen. John B. Sylvester.jpg
7 Sep 2001[13] 3 1968 (OCS) 33 (1946–        )
17 Colby M. Broadwater III
Lt. Gen. Colby M. Broadwater III.jpg
26 Sep 2001   5 1972 (Citadel) 29 (1950–        ) President, American College of the Building Arts, 2008–present.[14]
18 John M. LeMoyne
Lt. Gen. John LeMoyne.jpg
16 Oct 2001   2 1968 (ROTC) 33 (1943–        )
19 Joseph R. Inge
Joseph Inge.jpg
16 Oct 2001   6 1969 (Virginia Tech) 32 (1947–        )
20 John S. Caldwell Jr.
Lt. Gen. John S. Caldwell Jr.jpg
29 Oct 2001   2 1967 (USMA) 34 (1944–        )
* George W. Casey Jr.
LTG George W. Casey Jr.jpg
31 Oct 2001[15] 2 1970 (ROTC) 31 (1948–        )[l][m][n] Promoted to general, 1 Dec 2003.
21 Dennis D. Cavin
Lt. Gen. Dennis D. Cavin.jpg
16 Jan 2002[16] 2 1970 (ROTC) 32 (1947–        )
22 James R. Helmly
Lt. Gen. James R. Helmly.jpg
29 May 2002   4 1967 (OCS) 35 (1947–        )
* Richard A. Cody
Portrait of U.S. Army MAJ. Gen. Richard A. Cody, (Uncovered).jpg
31 Jul 2002  
  • Deputy Chief of Staff, Operations, Army Staff (DCS G-3), 2002–2004.
2 1972 (USMA) 30 (1950–        )[l] Promoted to general, 24 Jun 2004.
23 Edward Soriano
Edward Soriano.jpg
12 Aug 2002   2 1970 (ROTC) 32 (1946–        ) First Filipino-American promoted to general officer rank.
* Bantz J. Craddock
BGEN Bantz J. Craddock, official Army photo portrait.jpg
21 Aug 2002[17] 3 1971 (ROTC) 31 (1949–        )[h][o] Promoted to general, 1 Jan 2005.
24 Philip R. Kensinger Jr.
Lt. Gen. Philip R. Kensinger Jr.jpg
29 Aug 2002   3 1970 (USMA) 32
* William E. Ward
Lt. Gen. William E. Ward.jpg
8 Oct 2002[18] 4 1971 (ROTC) 31 (1949–        )[h][p] Promoted to general, 3 May 2006.
25 Richard A. Hack
Lt. Gen. Richard A. Hack.jpg
21 Oct 2002[19] 3 1972 (VMI) 30 (1950–        )
26 James L. Campbell
James L Campbell.jpg
4 Nov 2002   6 1971 (ROTC) 31 (1949–        )
* Charles C. Campbell
Lt. Gen. Charles C. Campbell.jpg
5 Nov 2002   5 1970 (ROTC) 32 (1948–2016) Promoted to general, 9 Jan 2007.
27 Robert W. Wagner
Lt. Gen. Robert W. Wagner (2).jpg
Jan 2003   5 1970 (USMA) 33
28 Thomas F. Metz
Lt. Gen. Thomas F. Metz in class As.png
7 Feb 2003   6 1971 (USMA) 32 (1948–        )
* Walter L. Sharp
LTG Walter L. Sharp.jpg
10 Mar 2003[20] 5 1974 (USMA) 29 (1952–        )[k] Promoted to general, 2 Jun 2008.
29 H. Steven Blum
H. Steven Blum (3).jpg
13 Apr 2003   6 1971 (OCS) 32 (1946–        )
30 Jerry L. Sinn
Portrait of U.S. Army Brig. Gen. Jerry L. Sinn Director of Operations and Support, Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Army (Financial Management) (Uncovered) (U.S. Army photo - DPLA - 97d9469cdd98aa64fe4f06975bbd03f4.jpeg
23 May 2003   3 1969 (USMA) 34
31 Anthony R. Jones
Lt. Gen. Anthony R. Jones.jpg
6 Jun 2003[22] 2 1970 (ROTC) 33 (1948–        )
32 Ricardo S. Sanchez
Ricardo Sanchez2.jpg
14 Jun 2003   3 1973 (ROTC) 30 (1953–        )
33 James J. Lovelace Jr.
Lovelace full.jpg
22 Jun 2003   6 1970 (USMA) 33 (1948–        )
34 William G. Boykin
WilliamBoykin.jpg
27 Jun 2003  
  • Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence, 2003–2007.
4 1971 (Virginia Tech) 32 (1948–        )
35 Claude V. Christianson
Lt. Gen. Claude V. Christianson.jpg
Jul 2003  
  • Deputy Chief of Staff, Logistics, Army Staff (DCS G-4), 2003–2005.
  • Director, Logistics, Joint Staff, J4, 2005–2008.
5 1971 (ROTC) 32
* Keith B. Alexander
NSA2009alexander.jpg
1 Aug 2003[24] 7 1974 (USMA) 29 (1952–        )[h] Promoted to general, 21 May 2010. Commander, U.S. Cyber Command, 2010–2014.
36 John R. Vines
Army.mil-2006-11-07-130533.jpg
26 Aug 2003[25] 3 1971 (ROTC) 32 (1949–        )
37 Steven W. Boutelle
Lt. Gen. Steven W. Boutelle.jpg
27 Aug 2003   4 1970 (OCS) 33
38 Franklin L. Hagenbeck
Franklin Hagenbeck.jpg
8 Nov 2003   7 1971 (USMA) 32 (1949–        )
39 David W. Barno
Barno.tiff
18 Nov 2003   3 1976 (USMA) 27 (1954–        ) Director, Near East South Asia Center for Strategic Studies, 2006–2010.[26]
40 Joseph L. Yakovac Jr.
Portrait of US Army Brigadier General Joseph L. Yakovac, Jr. (uncovered).jpg
18 Nov 2003   4 1971 (USMA) 32 (1949–        )
41 Robert T. Clark
Robert T Clark.jpg
5 Dec 2003   3 1970 (ROTC) 33 (1948–        )
42 John M. Curran
Lt. Gen. John M. Curran.jpg
12 Dec 2003[27] 4 1974 (ROTC) 29
43 Larry J. Dodgen
LTG Larry J. Dodgen.jpg
16 Dec 2003   3 1972 (ROTC) 31 (1949–2010)
* David H. Petraeus
David H. Petraeus.jpg
18 May 2004[28] 3 1974 (USMA) 30 (1952–        )[m][h][g] Promoted to general, 10 Feb 2007. Director, Central Intelligence Agency, 2011–2012. Son-in-law of Army four-star general William A. Knowlton.
44 Carl A. Strock
Carl A Strock.jpg
1 Jul 2004   3 1972 (OCS) 32 (1948–        )
45 Russel L. Honoré
Lt. Gen. Russell L. Honore.jpg
15 Jul 2004   4 1971 (ROTC) 33 (1947–        )
46 John M. Brown III
62-brown l.jpg
25 Aug 2004   4 1971 (OCS) 33 (c. 1947        )
47 Robert T. Dail
Lieutenant General Robert T. Dail.jpg
30 Sep 2004   4 1975 (ROTC) 29 (1953–        )
48 David F. Melcher
Lt. General David Melcher US Army Portrait.png
30 Sep 2004   4 1976 (USMA) 32 (1954–        )
49 Kevin C. Kiley
Kevin c kiley.jpg
30 Sep 2004   3 1976 (ROTC) 28 (1950–        )[r]
50 R. Steven Whitcomb
Whitcomb.jpg
13 Oct 2004   5 1970 (ROTC) 34 (1948–        )
51 James M. Dubik
James M. Dubik.jpg
3 Nov 2004   4 1971 (ROTC) 33 (1949–        )
52 Robert L. Van Antwerp Jr.
Robert L Van Antwerp.jpg
21 Nov 2004[30] 7 1972 (USMA) 32 (1950–        )
* Raymond T. Odierno
Raymond T. Odierno portrait 2007.jpg
1 Jan 2005[31] 3 1976 (USMA) 29 (1954–2021)[m][h][n] Promoted to general, 16 Sep 2008.
53 Stanley E. Green
Stanley E. Green.jpg
17 Mar 2005   3 1971 (OCS)[32] 34 (1947–        )
54 Dell L. Dailey
Lt. Gen. Dell L. Dailey.jpg
28 Apr 2005   2 1971 (USMA) 34 (1949–        ) U.S. Coordinator for Counterterrorism, 2007–2009.
55 Karl W. Eikenberry
Lt Gen Karl Eikenberry.jpg
4 May 2005   4 1973 (USMA) 32 (1951–        ) U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan, 2009–2011.
56 Clyde A. Vaughn
Clyde A. Vaughn (2).jpg
15 Jun 2005   4 1974 (OCS) 31 (1946–        )
57 Ronald L. Burgess Jr.
LTG BURGESS.jpg
Aug 2005   7 1974 (ROTC) 31 (1952–        ) Chief Operating Officer, Auburn University, 2018–2019; Executive Vice President, Auburn University, 2019–present.
58 William E. Mortensen
Lt. Gen. William E. Mortensen.jpg
2 Sep 2005[33] 3 1973 (ROTC) 32 (c. 1952        )
* Martin E. Dempsey
General Martin E. Dempsey.jpg
8 Sep 2005[34] 3 1974 (USMA) 31 (1952–        )[n][s] Promoted to general, 8 Dec 2008.
* Ann E. Dunwoody
LTG Ann E. Dunwoody 2008.jpg
30 Sep 2005   3 1975 (direct) 30 (1953–        ) Promoted to general, 14 Nov 2008.
59 John F. Kimmons
LTG John F. Kimmons (2).jpg
21 Oct 2005  
  • Deputy Chief of Staff, Intelligence, Army Staff (DCS G-2), 2005–2009.
  • Director, Intelligence Staff (DIS), 2009–2010.
5 1974 (Citadel) 31 (c. 1952        )
60 John R. Wood
Lt. Gen. John R. Wood.jpg
18 Nov 2005   3 1972 (USMA) 33
61 Keith W. Dayton
Portrait of U.S. Army Brig. Gen. Keith W. Dayton.jpg
18 Nov 2005   5 1970 (ROTC) 35 (1949–        )[t] Director, George C. Marshall European Center for Security Studies, 2011–2021.[35]
62 Michael D. Maples
Lt. Gen. Michael D. Maples.jpg
29 Nov 2005   4 1971 (USMA) 34 (1949–        )
* Peter W. Chiarelli
Peter W. Chiarelli 2006.jpg
19 Jan 2006   2 1972 (ROTC) 34 (1950–        )[l] Promoted to general, 4 Aug 2008.
* Stanley A. McChrystal
LTG Stanley A. McChrystal.jpg
16 Feb 2006[37] 3 1976 (USMA) 30 (1954–        )[g] Promoted to general, 15 Jun 2009.
63 Gary D. Speer
Lt. Gen. Gary D. Speer.jpg
3 Apr 2006[38] 3 1972 (USMA) 34
64 David P. Valcourt
David P. Valcourt TRADOC.jpg
11 Apr 2006[39] 4 1973 (USMA) 33 (1951–        )
65 Jack C. Stultz Jr.
Lt. Gen. Jack C. Stultz.jpg
25 May 2006   6 1974 (ROTC) 32 (1952–        )
66 Michael D. Rochelle
Lt. Gen. Michael D. Rochelle.jpg
Jun 2006   3 1972 (ROTC) 34 (1950–        )
67 Robert Wilson
Lt. Gen. Robert Wilson.jpg
23 Jun 2006   3 1972 (ROTC) 34
68 Douglas E. Lute
Douglas E. Lute, official military photo portrait.jpg
21 Jul 2006   4 1975 (USMA) 31 (1952–        ) U.S. Permanent Representative to NATO, 2013–2017.
69 N. Ross Thompson III
Lt. Gen. N. Ross Thompson III.jpg
Sep 2006   4 1974 (ROTC) 32 Son of Army lieutenant general N. Ross Thompson Jr.
70 Thomas R. Turner II
Lt. Gen. Thomas R. Turner II.jpg
4 Dec 2006   3 1974 (USMA) 32 (1955–        )
* Lloyd J. Austin III
Class A Command Photo LTG Austin.jpg
8 Dec 2006[40] 4 1975 (USMA) 31 (1953–        )[w][l][h] Promoted to general, 1 Sep 2010. U.S. Secretary of Defense, 2021–present.
71 Stephen M. Speakes
Lt. Gen. Stephen M. Speakes.jpg
9 Dec 2006   3 1974 (USMA) 32 (1952–        )
72 Joseph F. Peterson
Lt. Gen. Joseph F. Peterson.jpg
11 Dec 2006   4 1972 (ROTC) 34 (c. 1954        ) First Hawaiian-American to attain the rank of lieutenant general in the Army.
73 Kevin T. Campbell
Kevin T Campbell (cropped).jpg
18 Dec 2006   4 1973 (ROTC) 33 (1950–        )
* James D. Thurman
General James David Thurman.jpg
19 Jan 2007[41]
  • Commanding General, V Corps, 2007.
  • Deputy Chief of Staff, Operations, Plans and Training, Army Staff (DCS G-3/5/7), 2007–2010.
3 1975 (ROTC) 32 (1953–        )[k] Promoted to general, 3 Jun 2010.
74 Benjamin C. Freakley
LTG Benjamin C. Freakley.jpg
18 May 2007   5 1975 (USMA) 32 (1953–        )
75 William G. Webster Jr.
William G. Webster.jpg
29 May 2007   4 1974 (USMA) 33 (1951–        )
* Charles H. Jacoby Jr.
CharlesJacoby.jpg
31 May 2007[43] 4 1978 (USMA) 29 (1954–        )[h] Promoted to general, 3 Aug 2011.
76 William B. Caldwell IV
LTG William B Caldwell IV Official Photo 2011.jpg
11 Jun 2007   6 1976 (USMA) 31 (1954–        ) President, Georgia Military College, 2013–present. Son of Army lieutenant general William B. Caldwell III.
77 Richard P. Zahner
Lt. Gen. Richard P. Zahner.jpg
28 Jun 2007  
  • Deputy Under Secretary of Defense (Intelligence and Warfighting Support) (DUSD(I&WS)), 2007–2009.
  • Deputy Chief of Staff, Intelligence, Army Staff (DCS G-2), 2009–2012.
5 1976 (ROTC) 31
78 Francis H. Kearney III
Lt. Gen. Francis H. Kearney III.jpg
28 Jun 2007   4 1976 (USMA) 31 (1954–        )
79 David P. Fridovich
Fridovich-david.jpg
8 Jul 2007[44] 4 1974 (ROTC) 33
80 John D. Gardner
Jack Gardner.gif
11 Jul 2007   5 1976 (USMA) 31
* Carter F. Ham
Lt. Gen. Carter F. Ham.jpg
6 Aug 2007[45] 1 1976 (ROTC) 31 (1952–        )[h] Promoted to general, 28 Aug 2008.
81 Kenneth W. Hunzeker
HunzekerKennethW-ACU 2007-08.JPG
8 Aug 2007   3 1975 (USMA) 32 (1952–        )
82 Michael A. Vane
Lt. Gen. Michael A. Vane.jpg
20 Aug 2007   4 1975 (USMA) 32
83 Jeffrey A. Sorenson
Jeffrey A. Sorenson.jpg
16 Nov 2007   4 1973 (USMA) 34
84 Eric B. Schoomaker
LTG Eric Schoomaker.jpg
11 Dec 2007   4 1970 (ROTC) 37 (1948–        ) Brother of Army four-star general Peter Schoomaker.[46]
85 Thomas G. Miller
Thomas G. Miller.jpg
11 Jan 2008   3 1973 (ROTC) 35
86 David H. Huntoon Jr.
LTG David Huntoon.jpg
25 Jan 2008   5 1973 (USMA) 35 (1951–        ) Commandant, U.S. Army War College, 2003–2008.
87 Benjamin R. Mixon
Lt Gen Benjamin R Mixon as USAPACCOM CO.jpg
1 Feb 2008   3 1975 (NGCSU)[x] 33 (1953–        )
88 Joseph F. Fil Jr.
Joseph F. Fil, Jr. (2).jpg
18 Feb 2008   2 1976 (ROTC) 32 (1953–        )[y][z]
89 Kathleen M. Gainey
Lieutenantgeneralkathleenmgainey.jpg
13 Mar 2008   5 1978 (ROTC) 30 (1956–        )
90 Mitchell H. Stevenson
Mitchell H. Stevenson (2).jpg
Jun 2008  
  • Deputy Chief of Staff, Logistics, Army Staff (DCS G-4), 2008–2011.
3 1974 (ROTC) 34 (1952–        )
91 Frank G. Helmick
Lt. Gen. Frank Helmick.jpg
3 Jul 2008   4 1976 (USMA) 32 (1953–        )
92 Robert E. Durbin
Lt. Gen. Robert E. Durbin.jpg
23 Jul 2008  
  • Special Assistant to the Secretary of the Army for Enterprise Management, 2008–2010.
  • Director, Army Office of Business Transformation/Special Assistant to the Secretary of the Army for Enterprise Management (DIROBT), 2010.
  • Director, Army Office of Business Transformation (DIROBT), 2010–2011.
3 1975 (USMA) 33
93 Edgar E. Stanton III
Lt. Gen. Edgar E. Stanton III.gif
24 Jul 2008[49] 4 1972 (ROTC) 36
94 Rick Lynch
Rick Lynch.jpg
25 Jul 2008   3 1977 (USMA) 31
* David M. Rodriguez
Lt. Gen. David M. Rodriguez (cropped).jpg
29 Jul 2008[50] 3 1976 (USMA) 32 (1954–        )[h] Promoted to general, 12 Sep 2011.
95 John F. Mulholland Jr.
Lt. Gen. John F. Mulholland Jr.jpg
7 Nov 2008   8 1978 (ROTC) 30 (1955–        )
96 Patrick J. O'Reilly
Lt. Gen. Patrick J. O
21 Nov 2008   4 1978 (USMA) 30 (c. 1959        )[aa]
97 Scott C. Black
LTGScottCBlack.jpg
11 Dec 2008   1 1974 (ROTC) 31[ab] (1952–        ) First three-star judge advocate general of the Army.
98 James H. Pillsbury
Lt. Gen. James H. Pillsbury.jpg
15 Dec 2008   3 1973 (ROTC) 35
99 Carroll F. Pollett
LTG Carroll F. Pollett.jpg
17 Dec 2008   4 1975 (OCS) 33
* Dennis L. Via
LTG Dennis L. Via.jpg
3 Aug 2009[52]
  • Director, Command, Control, Communications and Computers/Cyber, Joint Staff, J6, 2009–2011.
  • Deputy Commanding General/Chief of Staff, U.S. Army Materiel Command (DCG/COFS AMC), 2011–2012.
3 1980 (ROTC) 29 (1958–        ) Promoted to general, 7 Aug 2012.
100 P. Kenneth Keen
P. K. (Ken) Keen.jpg
Sep 2009   4 1974 (ROTC) 35 (1952–        )
101 Mark P. Hertling
Lt. Gen. Mark Hertling.jpg
19 Sep 2009   3 1975 (USMA) 34 (1953–        ) Chairman, American Battle Monuments Commission, 2021–present.[53][54]
* Robert W. Cone
LTG Cone 1.jpg
22 Sep 2009   2 1979 (USMA) 30 (1957–2016) Promoted to general, 29 Apr 2011.
102 Dana K. Chipman
Dana K. Chipman - official portrait.jpg
1 Oct 2009   4 1980 (USMA) 29 (1958–        ) Republican counsel, U.S. House Select Committee on Benghazi, 2014–2016.[55]
103 Michael D. Barbero
Michael D Barbero.jpg
7 Oct 2009   4 1976 (USMA) 33 (1955–        )
104 Robert P. Lennox
Robert P. Lennox (1).jpg
2 Nov 2009[56] 3 1977 (USMA) 32
105 Keith M. Huber
Lt. Gen. Keith M. Huber.jpg
10 Nov 2009   4 1975 (USMA) 34
106 Guy C. Swan III
Guy C Swan III.jpg
15 Dec 2009   2 1976 (USMA) 33 (1954–        )
107 Michael L. Oates
Lt. Gen. Michael L. Oates (1).jpg
30 Dec 2009   2 1979 (USMA) 30

Timeline

2000–2009

Michael L. OatesGuy C. Swan IIIKeith M. HuberRobert P. LennoxMichael D. BarberoDana K. ChipmanRobert W. ConeMark P. HertlingKen KeenDennis L. ViaCarroll F. PollettJames H. PillsburyScott C. BlackPatrick J. O'ReillyJohn F. Mulholland Jr.David M. RodriguezRick LynchEdgar E. Stanton IIIRobert E. DurbinFrank G. HelmickMitchell H. StevensonKathleen M. GaineyJoseph F. Fil Jr.Benjamin R. MixonDavid H. Huntoon Jr.Thomas G. MillerEric B. SchoomakerJeffrey A. SorensonMichael A. VaneKenneth W. HunzekerCarter F. HamJohn D. GardnerDavid P. FridovichRichard P. ZahnerFrancis H. Kearney IIIWilliam B. Caldwell IVCharles H. Jacoby Jr.William G. Webster Jr.Benjamin C. FreakleyJames D. ThurmanKevin T. CampbellJoseph F. PetersonStephen M. SpeakesLloyd J. Austin IIIThomas R. Turner IIN. Ross Thompson IIIDouglas E. LuteRobert WilsonMichael D. RochelleJack C. Stultz Jr.David P. ValcourtGary D. SpeerStanley A. McChrystalPeter W. ChiarelliMichael D. MaplesJohn R. WoodKeith W. DaytonJohn F. KimmonsAnn E. DunwoodyMartin E. DempseyWilliam E. MortensenRonald L. Burgess Jr.Clyde A. VaughnKarl W. EikenberryDell L. DaileyStanley E. GreenRaymond T. OdiernoRobert L. Van Antwerp Jr.James M. DubikR. Steven WhitcombDavid F. MelcherKevin C. KileyRobert T. DailJohn M. Brown IIIRussel L. HonoréCarl A. StrockDavid H. PetraeusLarry J. DodgenJohn M. CurranRobert T. ClarkJoseph L. Yakovac Jr.David W. BarnoFranklin L. HagenbeckSteven W. BoutelleJohn R. VinesKeith B. AlexanderClaude V. ChristiansonWilliam G. BoykinJames J. Lovelace Jr.Ricardo S. SanchezAnthony R. JonesJerry L. SinnH. Steven BlumWalter L. SharpThomas F. MetzRobert W. WagnerCharles C. CampbellJames L. CampbellRichard A. HackWilliam E. WardPhilip R. Kensinger Jr.Bantz J. CraddockEdward SorianoRichard A. CodyJames R. HelmlyDennis D. CavinGeorge W. Casey Jr.John S. Caldwell Jr.John M. LeMoyneJoseph R. IngeColby M. Broadwater IIIJohn B. SylvesterBurwell B. Bell IIIDavid D. McKiernanWilliam S. WallaceBenjamin S. GriffinThomas J. PlewesWilliam J. Lennox Jr.Roger C. SchultzRoy E. BeauchampJoseph M. Cosumano Jr.Joseph K. Kellogg Jr.Robert B. FlowersBryan D. BrownCharles S. Mahan Jr.John P. AbizaidDaniel R. ZaniniJames B. PeakeFreddy E. McFarrenPaul T. MikolashekRobert W. Noonan Jr.Dan K. McNeillPeter M. CuvielloTimothy J. MaudeIraq WarWar in Afghanistan (2001–2021)

History

See also: List of lieutenant generals in the United States Army before 1960

Quasi-War

George Washington

The rank of lieutenant general in the United States Army was established in 1798 when President John Adams commissioned George Washington in that grade to command the armies of the United States during the Quasi-War with France. The next year, Congress replaced the office of lieutenant general with that of General of the Armies of the United States but Washington died before accepting the new commission, remaining a lieutenant general until posthumously promoted to General of the Armies in 1976.[57]

Mexican War

Winfield Scott

In 1855 Congress rewarded the Mexican War service of Major General Winfield Scott by authorizing his promotion to brevet lieutenant general, to rank from 29 March 1847, the date of the Mexican surrender at the Siege of Veracruz.[58] As a lieutenant general only by brevet, Scott remained in the permanent grade of major general but was entitled to be paid as a lieutenant general from the date of his brevet commission, resulting in a public tussle with Secretary of War Jefferson Davis over the amount of backpay Scott was owed. Congress resolved all issues in Scott's favor once Davis left office in 1857, and allowed Scott to retire at full pay in 1861.[59]

Civil War

John M. Schofield

The grade of lieutenant general was revived in February 1864 to allow President Abraham Lincoln to promote Major General Ulysses S. Grant to command the armies of the United States during the American Civil War. After the war, Grant was promoted to general and his vacant lieutenant general grade was filled by Major General William T. Sherman. When Grant became President in 1869, Sherman succeeded him as general and Major General Philip H. Sheridan succeeded Sherman as lieutenant general. Congress suspended further promotions to general and lieutenant general in 1870, but made an exception in 1888 to promote Sheridan on his deathbed by discontinuing the grade of lieutenant general and merging it with the grade of general.[60]

In 1895 Congress briefly revived the grade of lieutenant general to promote Sheridan's successor as commanding general of the Army, Major General John M. Schofield. Schofield had lobbied for the grade to be permanently reestablished in order to cement the primacy of all future commanding generals over the Army's other major generals. However, Congress regarded the lieutenant generalcy as the penultimate military accolade, second only to promotion to full general, and refused to devalue the title's significance by conferring it on any future commanding general less eminent than previous recipients. Instead, Schofield himself was promoted to lieutenant general as a one-time personal honor eight months before he retired.[61] In retirement Schofield argued that the rank of lieutenant general ought to be permanently associated with the office of commanding general, not the individual officers occupying it, and that an officer serving as commanding general should hold the ex officio rank of lieutenant general while so detailed but revert to his permanent grade of major general upon leaving office. Over the next five decades, Schofield's concept of lieutenant general as temporary ex officio rank would slowly prevail over the concept of lieutenant general as permanent personal grade.[62]

Spanish–American War

Henry C. Corbin

The question of whether the lieutenant generalcy should be a permanent personal grade or a temporary ex officio rank was phrased in terms of the line of the Army, whose officers commanded combat formations, and its staff, whose officers performed specialized support functions. Permanent personal promotions to general officer grades were only available in the line, but staff officers could temporarily acquire general officer rank while detailed to an office bearing that statutory rank, so officers holding the permanent grade of general officer were called general officers of the line and ex officio general officers were called general officers of the staff.[63]

Arthur MacArthur Jr.

In June 1900 Schofield's successor as commanding general, Major General Nelson A. Miles, was made a lieutenant general of the staff by an amendment to the United States Military Academy appropriations bill that granted the rank of lieutenant general to the senior major general of the line commanding the Army.[64] Eight months later, the 1901 Army reorganization bill replaced this ex officio rank with the permanent grade of lieutenant general of the line.[65] When Miles retired in 1903, the senior major general was Adjutant General Henry C. Corbin, but as a staff corps officer Corbin was ineligible to command the Army, so the lieutenant generalcy went instead to the senior major general of the line, Samuel B. M. Young. Young reached the statutory retirement age five months later and was succeeded by Adna R. Chaffee. Seniority and scheduled retirements suggested that Chaffee would be succeeded in 1906 by Arthur MacArthur Jr., but both Corbin and Major General John C. Bates were scheduled to retire for age that year and it was decided that MacArthur's ascension would not be materially delayed by first promoting Bates and Corbin to lieutenant general for the few months of active duty remaining to them.[66]

Corbin's promotion became controversial when he declined to be detailed as chief of staff of the Army. Corbin felt the chief of staff should be a younger officer with the time and energy to enact a long-range program, not a superannuated placeholder on the cusp of retirement, so when Bates retired Corbin became lieutenant general but Brigadier General J. Franklin Bell became chief of staff.[67] However, by divorcing the Army's highest grade from its highest office, Corbin had again reduced the lieutenant generalcy to a personal honor. Many in Congress believed Corbin was not in the same class as Grant, Sherman, Sheridan, and Schofield, and pressed to abolish the lieutenant generalcy immediately, but after a heated debate MacArthur's supporters managed to preserve the grade until after MacArthur's promotion.[68]

MacArthur was promoted to lieutenant general in August 1906. Since he was the last Civil War officer expected to succeed to the grade, Congress stopped further promotions to lieutenant general in March 1907 and stated that the active-duty grade would be abolished when MacArthur retired.[69] Later that month, MacArthur asked to be relieved of his duties, disgruntled at his anomalous position of being the ranking officer of the Army yet consigned to the command of a mere division and subject to orders from an officer he outranked, Chief of Staff Bell, whose four-year term extended beyond MacArthur's statutory retirement date. MacArthur returned home to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where he marked time writing up travel reports until he retired in 1909.[70]

World War I

Hunter Liggett

In October 1917, Congress authorized the President to appoint as generals the chief of staff of the Army and the commander of the United States forces in France, and as lieutenant generals the commanders of the field armies and army corps, so that they would not be outranked by their counterparts in allied European armies. Unlike previous incarnations, these new grades were time-limited, authorized only for the duration of the World War I emergency, after which their bearers would revert to their lower permanent grades. The commander of the American Expeditionary Force, Major General John J. Pershing, was immediately appointed emergency general, as were two successive Army chiefs of staff, but no emergency lieutenant generals were named for over a year because the armies they would command had not yet been organized.[71]

On 21 October 1918, Major Generals Hunter Liggett, commander of the First Army, and Robert L. Bullard, commander of the Second Army, were nominated to be emergency lieutenant generals, less than three weeks before the Armistice.[72] With victory imminent, Secretary of War Newton D. Baker sought legislation to reward the Army's high commanders by making their emergency grades permanent. However, Army Chief of Staff Peyton C. March had alienated many members of Congress by unilaterally reorganizing the Army without their input and his enemies blocked every effort to honor any officer but Pershing with higher rank. In the end, Pershing was promoted to permanent General of the Armies, but March, Liggett, and Bullard reverted to their permanent grades of major general when their emergency grades expired on 1 July 1920.[73]

Edgar Jadwin

After the war, there were a number of unsuccessful attempts to retire as lieutenant generals a list of officers that variously included Major Generals March, Liggett, Bullard, Enoch H. Crowder, Joseph T. Dickman, Leonard Wood, John F. Morrison, James G. Harbord, James W. McAndrew, Henry P. McCain, Charles P. Summerall, Ernest Hinds, Harry F. Hodges, William Campbell Langfitt, and George W. Goethals; Surgeon General Merritte W. Ireland; and Colonel William L. Kenly.[74] Finally, on 7 August 1929, the Army chief of engineers, Major General Edgar Jadwin, was retired as a lieutenant general by a 1915 law that automatically promoted officers one grade upon retirement if they had helped build the Panama Canal.[75] There was some consternation that a peacetime staff corps officer had secured more or less by chance a promotion deliberately withheld from the victorious field commanders of World War I, so the year after Jadwin's promotion all World War I officers were advanced to their highest wartime ranks on the retired list, including Liggett and Bullard.[76]

In 1942, Congress allowed retired Army generals to be advanced one grade on the retired list or posthumously if they had been recommended in writing during World War I for promotion to a higher rank which they had not since received, provided they had also been awarded the Medal of Honor, the Distinguished Service Cross, or the Distinguished Service Medal; retired Major Generals James G. Harbord and William M. Wright were both advanced to lieutenant general under this provision.[77]

Interwar

Walter C. Short

After Pershing retired in 1924, the rank of the Army chief of staff reverted to major general, the highest permanent grade in the peacetime Army. However, the Navy continued to maintain three ex officio vice admirals and four ex officio admirals, including the chief of naval operations, so in 1929 Congress raised the ex officio rank of the Army chief of staff to full general.[78] In 1939 Congress also assigned the ex officio rank of lieutenant general to the major generals of the Regular Army specifically assigned to command each of the four field armies, allowing President Franklin D. Roosevelt to appoint the first new active-duty lieutenant generals since World War I: First Army commander Hugh A. Drum, Second Army commander Stanley H. Ford, Third Army commander Stanley D. Embick, and Fourth Army commander Albert J. Bowley. Congress extended similar rank in July 1940 to the major generals commanding the Panama Canal and Hawaiian Departments.[79]

As general officers of the staff, these new lieutenant generals bore three-star rank only while actually commanding a field army or department, and reverted to their permanent two-star rank upon being reassigned or retired. However, during World War II most lieutenant generals of the staff received concurrent personal appointments as temporary lieutenant generals in the Army of the United States so that they could be reassigned without loss of rank. Postwar legislation allowed officers to retire in their highest temporary grades, so most lieutenant generals of the staff eventually retired at that rank.[80] Of the lieutenant generals of the staff who were never appointed temporary lieutenant generals, Albert J. Bowley, Stanley H. Ford, Charles D. Herron, Daniel Van Voorhis, Herbert J. Brees, and Walter C. Short retired as major generals upon reaching the statutory retirement age; and Lloyd R. Fredendall qualified to retire in grade due to physical disability incurred during his term as lieutenant general. After the war, Brees and Short both applied to be advanced to lieutenant general on the retired list under a 1948 law; Brees was promoted but the administration specifically declined to advance Short, who had been relieved of command of the Hawaiian Department a few days after the defeat at Pearl Harbor.[81]

World War II

Delos C. Emmons

In September 1940, Congress authorized the President to appoint Regular Army officers to temporary higher grades in the Army of the United States during time of war or national emergency. The first temporary lieutenant general appointed under this authority was Major General Delos C. Emmons, Commander, General Headquarters Air Force; followed by Major General Lesley J. McNair, Chief of Staff, General Headquarters, U.S. Army. In July 1941, retired four-star general Douglas MacArthur was recalled to active duty and appointed temporary lieutenant general as Commanding General, U.S. Army Forces in the Far East.[82]

Dozens of officers were promoted to temporary lieutenant general during World War II. Lieutenant generals typically commanded one of the numbered field armies or air forces; served as deputy theater commanders; or headed major headquarters staffs, administrative commands, or support organizations. Officers were only allowed to retire in their temporary grades if they were retired due to disability incurred in the line of duty, but those compelled by good health to retire in a lower grade were eventually restored to their highest wartime ranks on the retired list.[83]

Subject to Senate approval, anyone could be appointed temporary lieutenant general, even a civilian. In January 1942, the outgoing Director General of the Office of Production Management, William S. Knudsen, was commissioned temporary lieutenant general in the Army of the United States, the only civilian ever to join the Army at such a high initial rank.[84]

Postwar

John W. O'Daniel

The modern office of lieutenant general was established by the Officer Personnel Act of 1947, which authorized the President to designate certain positions of importance and responsibility to carry the ex officio rank of general or lieutenant general, to be filled by officers holding the permanent or temporary grade of major general or higher. Officers could retire in their highest active-duty rank, subject to Senate approval. The total number of positions allowed to carry such rank was capped at 15 percent of the total number of general officers, which worked out initially to nine generals and thirty-five lieutenant generals, of whom four generals and seventeen lieutenant generals were required to be in the Air Corps. All Air Corps personnel were transferred in grade to the United States Air Force by the National Security Act of 1947.[85]

Lieutenant generals typically headed divisions of the General Staff in Washington, D.C.; field armies in Europe, Japan, and the continental United States; the Army command in the Pacific; the unified command in the Caribbean; the occupation force in Austria; and senior educational institutions such as the National War College, the Army War College, and the Armed Forces Staff College. During the Korean War, the commanding general of the Eighth Army was elevated to full general, and the Eighth Army deputy commanding general and subordinate corps commanders were elevated to lieutenant general.

Senator John C. Stennis
Senator John C. Stennis

By mid-1952, the number of active-duty general officers had swelled to nearly twice its World War II peak. In response, Congress enacted the Officer Grade Limitation Act of 1954, which tied the maximum number of generals to the total number of officers. However, the real limit was the so-called Stennis ceiling imposed by Mississippi Senator John C. Stennis, whose Senate Armed Services Committee refused to confirm general or flag officer nominations beyond what he considered to be a reasonable total, which typically was much lower than the statutory limit. The Stennis ceiling remained in effect from the mid-1950s until the post-Vietnam War drawdown.[86]

Unlike the temporary general and flag officer ranks of World War II, the 1947 ranks were attached to offices, not individuals, and were lost if an officer was reassigned to a lesser job.[87] Army generals almost always preferred to retire rather than revert to a lower permanent grade. A rare exception was Lt. Gen. John W. O'Daniel, who temporarily relinquished his third star upon becoming chief of the Military Assistance Advisory Group in French Indochina so that he would not outrank the theater commander in chief, French lieutenant general Henri Navarre. O'Daniel got his star back five months later when France withdrew from Indochina following Navarre's defeat at Dien Bien Phu.[88]

The rules dictating appointment of lieutenant generals, including the role of the Senate in confirming nominees, have remained largely consistent since the passing of the 1947 act, only changing periodically with congressionally dictated amendments to general and flag officer distributions.[89] Section 526 of the United States Code codifies the limits placed on general and flag officer appointments, specifying further for appointments above two-star grade.[90]

The formation of a series of new agencies directly under the Department of Defense in the 1960s and succeeding decades due to interservice deficiencies between the military departments necessitated an increase in joint duty three-star appointments.[91] The same became true for the two-star chiefs of service reserve commands in 2001[92] and service judge advocates general in 2008,[93] courtesy of the annually passed National Defense Authorization Acts.

War on Terror

Peter W. Chiarelli

The national emergency declared by President George W. Bush in the wake of the September 11 attacks[94] effectively removed all statutory limits for general officers in the Army, resulting in a disproportionate number of lieutenant general billets being created for operations against extremist groups in the Middle East as part of the War on Terror, as land warfare was predominant against the guerilla tactics of groups such as al-Qaeda, ISIL and the Taliban.[95] It thus became commonplace for corps or field army commanders in the United States to be dual-hatted as the commander of a coalition force in support of such campaigns, such as Multi-National Corps – Iraq. A majority of eminent generals in the 2000s and 2010s either served as three-star field commanders or coalition commanders in the Middle Eastern theater of operations, including John Abizaid, David Petraeus, Peter Chiarelli,[96] Raymond Odierno and Lloyd Austin.

In anticipation of the end of the Iraq War and War in Afghanistan in 2011 and 2021 respectively, Congress moved to sharply reduce general and flag officer caps in directly preceding years, coinciding with the deactivations or American withdrawal from the respective campaigns' attached three-star and four-star commands.[97][98]

Modern use

Lt. Gen. Russel L. Honoré is greeted by President George W. Bush in October 2005 at Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base before a briefing on Joint Task Force Katrina relief efforts.
Lt. Gen. Russel L. Honoré is greeted by President George W. Bush in October 2005 at Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base before a briefing on Joint Task Force Katrina relief efforts.

Lieutenant generals in the United States Army typically serve as corps or field army commanders, but also include senior staff positions under the authority of the four-star chief and vice chief of staff (such as the director of the Army staff), high-level specialty positions[ac] like the judge advocate general,[99] chief of engineers,[100] surgeon general[100] and chief of Army Reserve,[101] deputy commanders of four-star Army commands and the commanders of most Army service component commands. The superintendent of the United States Military Academy has also been a lieutenant general without interruption since 1981, as has been the director of the Army National Guard[102] since 2001.[103]

About 20 to 30 joint service three-star billets exist at any given time that can be occupied by a three-star officer, among the most prestigious being the director of the Joint Staff (DJS), principal staff advisor to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and historically considered a stepping stone to four-star rank.[104] All deputy commanders of the unified combatant commands are of three-star rank (except the deputy commander of U.S. European Command until 2007), as are directors of Defense Agencies not headed by a civilian such as the director of the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIRDIA).[105] Internationally-based three-star positions include the United States military representative to the NATO Military Committee (USMILREP) and the security coordinator for the Palestinian National Authority in Israel. All nominees for three-star rank must be confirmed via majority by the Senate before the appointee can take office and thus assume the rank.[106]

Three-star positions, elevations and reductions

Lt. Gen. Karl W. Eikenberry, commander of  Combined Forces Command – Afghanistan at a Pentagon press briefing, 8 December 2005.
Lt. Gen. Karl W. Eikenberry, commander of Combined Forces Command – Afghanistan at a Pentagon press briefing, 8 December 2005.

Several new joint duty positions eligible to be held to be held by an Army officer, in addition to existing Army officers, were created at the appointed grade of lieutenant general, or elevated to grade between 2000 and 2010. In particular, a multitude of new positions were created in support of the war in Afghanistan and the Iraq War, which began in 2001 and 2003 respectively.

Lt. Gen. H. Steven Blum, outgoing chief of the National Guard Bureau is presented an award by Secretary of Defense Robert Gates in a ceremony on 17 November 2008.
Lt. Gen. H. Steven Blum, outgoing chief of the National Guard Bureau is presented an award by Secretary of Defense Robert Gates in a ceremony on 17 November 2008.

At least three joint duty positions within the Department of Defense were created or restored, with one leading a new Defense agency, the Joint Improvised-Threat Defeat Organization. Additionally, all deputy commanders in chief of the unified combatant commands would be retitled as deputy commanders, by order of Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld on 24 October 2002.[108]

Lt. Gen. Jack L. Rives and Lt. Gen. Scott C. Black, judge advocates general of the U.S. Air Force and U.S. Army, perform the ribbon cutting at the Pentagon Army Air Force Legal Assistance Office on 25 February 2009.
Lt. Gen. Jack L. Rives and Lt. Gen. Scott C. Black, judge advocates general of the U.S. Air Force and U.S. Army, perform the ribbon cutting at the Pentagon Army Air Force Legal Assistance Office on 25 February 2009.

Two new three-star Army commands were stood up between 2000 and 2010, and two Army major commands received new three-star positions. Additionally, all directorates of the Army Staff were redesignated in accordance with the Continental staff system in 2002, receiving the prefix "G".[ad]

Several positions in the Army in charge of specialty branches and functional areas received elevations to three-star grade, either by statute or Army regulation.

Senate confirmations

Maj. Gen. Joseph J. Taluto with Capt. Phillip Esposito at Forward Operating Base Danger in Tikrit, Iraq on 3 March 2005.
Maj. Gen. Joseph J. Taluto with Capt. Phillip Esposito at Forward Operating Base Danger in Tikrit, Iraq on 3 March 2005.

While it is rare for three-star or four-star nominations to face even token opposition in the Senate, nominations that do face opposition due to controversy surrounding the nominee in question are typically withdrawn. Nominations that are not withdrawn are allowed to expire without action at the end of the legislative session.

Additionally, events that take place after Senate confirmation may still delay or even prevent the nominee from assuming office.

Legislative history

The following list of Congressional legislation includes all acts of Congress pertaining to appointments to the grade of lieutenant general in the United States Army from 2000 to 2009.[ae]

Each entry lists an act of Congress, its citation in the United States Statutes at Large, and a summary of the act's relevance, with officers affected by the act bracketed where applicable. Positions listed without reference to rank are assumed to be eligible for officers of three-star grade or higher.

List of legislation on appointments of lieutenant generals from 2000 to 2009
Legislation Citation Summary
Act of October 30, 2000

[Floyd D. Spence National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2001]

 114 Stat. 1654A–103
 114 Stat. 1654A–105
 114 Stat. 1654A–122
  • Raised statutory rank of the chief of Army Reserve to lieutenant general (Thomas J. Plewes).
  • Raised statutory rank of the director of the Army National Guard to lieutenant general (Roger C. Schultz).
  • Increased percentage of general officers in the Army or Air Force that may be appointed above grade of major general from 15% to 15.7%.
  • Requested the President to advance the late Major General Walter C. Short to grade of lieutenant general on the retired list.[af]
Act of December 2, 2002

[Bob Stump National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2003]

 116 Stat. 2487
 116 Stat. 2525
  • Established a Department of Defense Test Resource Management Center and assigned director statutory grade of lieutenant general or vice admiral.
  • Exempted the senior military assistant to the secretary of defense from number and percentage limitations on general or flag officers, if serving in grade of lieutenant general or vice admiral (Bantz J. Craddock).
Act of January 6, 2006

[National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2006]

 119 Stat. 3226
  • Prohibited frocking of officers below grade of major general or rear admiral to grades above major general or rear admiral.
Act of January 28, 2008

[National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2008]

 122 Stat. 94
 122 Stat. 114
 122 Stat. 115
 122 Stat. 501
  • Raised statutory rank of the judge advocate general of the Army to lieutenant general (Scott C. Black).
  • Increased percentage of general or flag officers that may be appointed above grade of major general or rear admiral from 15.7% to 16.3%.
  • Allowed officers serving in grade of lieutenant general, general, vice admiral, or admiral to continue holding such position for up to 60 days following reassignment from such position, unless placed sooner in another designated position.
  • Required one deputy commander of the combatant command covering the geographic area of responsibility of which includes the United States[ag] to be a National Guard officer eligible for promotion to lieutenant general (William G. Webster Jr., H. Steven Blum).
Act of October 14, 2008

[Duncan Hunter National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2009]

 122 Stat. 4433
 122 Stat. 4435
 122 Stat. 4436
  • Increased percentage of general officers in the Army or Air Force that may be appointed above grade of major general from 16.3% to 16.4%, and reserved percentage increase in Army general officers for those serving in acquisition positions.
  • Revised cap on total number of authorized Army general officers to be reduced to 225, of which 45 may be appointed above grade of major general pending a congressional report by the secretary of defense.
  • Authorized the secretary of defense to designate up to 68 officers above grade of major general or rear admiral for joint duty assignments.
Act of October 28, 2009

[National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2010]

 123 Stat. 2273
  • Capped total number of Army general officers who may be appointed above grade of major general at 45, of whom not more than seven to be above grade of lieutenant general, pursuant to changes made under NDAA 2009.

See also

References

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Notes

  1. ^ a b Dates of rank are taken, where available, from the U.S. Army register of active and retired commissioned officers, relevant U.S. Army-affiliated websites and the National Guard Senior Leader Management Office. The date listed is that of the officer's first promotion to lieutenant general. If such a date cannot be found, the next date substituted should be that of the officer's assumption of his/her first three-star appointment. Failing which, the officer's first Senate confirmation date to lieutenant general should be substituted. For officers promoted to lieutenant general on the same date, they should be organized first by date of promotion to four-star rank, and then by the tier of their first listed assignment upon promotion to lieutenant general.
  2. ^ a b Positions listed are those held by the officer when promoted to lieutenant general. Dates listed are for the officer's full tenure, which may predate promotion to three-star rank or postdate retirement from active duty. Positions held in an acting capacity are italicized.
  3. ^ a b The number of years of active-duty service at three-star rank is approximated by subtracting the year in the "Date of rank" column from the last year in the "Position" column. Time spent between active-duty three-star assignments is not counted.
  4. ^ a b Sources of commission are listed in parentheses after the year of commission and include: the United States Military Academy (USMA); Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) at a civilian university; ROTC at a senior military college such as the Virginia Military Institute (VMI), Norwich University (Norwich), Pennsylvania Military College (PMC), University of North Georgia (UNG), or Widener University (Widener); Officer Candidate School (OCS); the Army National Guard (ARNG); and direct commission (direct).
  5. ^ a b The number of years in commission before being promoted to three-star rank is approximated by subtracting the year in the "Commission" column from the year in the "Date of rank" column.
  6. ^ a b Notes include years of birth and death; awards of the Medal of Honor, Congressional Gold Medal, Presidential Medal of Freedom, or honors of similar significance; major government appointments; university presidencies or equivalents; familial relationships with significant military officers or government officials such as U.S. Presidents, cabinet secretaries, U.S. Senators, or state governors; and unusual career events such as premature relief or death in office.
  7. ^ a b c d Served as Commander, International Security Assistance Force (CDRISAF).
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Served as a combatant commander (CCDR).
  9. ^ Designated as Army G-4 in 2002.[7]
  10. ^ Designated as Army G-8 in 2002.
  11. ^ a b c Served as Commander, U.S. Forces Korea (COMUSFK).
  12. ^ a b c d Served as Vice Chief of Staff, U.S. Army (VCSA).
  13. ^ a b c Served as Commander, Multi-National Force – Iraq (CDRMNF-I).
  14. ^ a b c Served as Chief of Staff, U.S. Army (CSA).
  15. ^ Served as Supreme Allied Commander Europe (SACEUR).
  16. ^ Retired as lieutenant general, Nov 2012.
  17. ^ Confirmed for a two-year extension of statutory term as CNGB pending confirmation of a successor to four-star rank.[21]
  18. ^ Relieved, Mar 2007, and retired as major general.
  19. ^ Served as Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff (CJCS).
  20. ^ Nomination as U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine returned to the President, 2021.
  21. ^ Did not formally take command of V Corps as planned from Ricardo Sanchez due to being investigated for wrongful government expenditures under the Antideficiency Act.[36]
  22. ^ While holding this position, Lute also held the formal rank of Assistant to the President as a senior staffer within the Executive Office of the President. He remained in this capacity as a civilian after his retirement from active duty from 2010 to 2013.
  23. ^ Served as Commanding General, U.S. Forces – Iraq (CG USF-I).
  24. ^ Graduated from North Georgia College & State University, which was merged with Gainesville State College in 2013 and is now the University of North Georgia.
  25. ^ Relieved with reversion to major general, Nov 2010; retired as major general, Aug 2012.[47]
  26. ^ Nomination as Inspector General, U.S. Army (IG) confirmed, Aug 2010; retired prior to assumption of post, Aug 2012.[48]
  27. ^ Promoted directly from rank of brigadier general.
  28. ^ Served three years as an armor officer before selection to attend law school from 1977 to 1980 (on off-duty status); returned to active duty as a judge advocate in 1981.[51]
  29. ^ For officers in specialty career paths such as the JAG Corps, Medical Corps, or Army Reserve, these positions are the highest they can attain. There have been exceptions, such as when Maryanne Miller was promoted to general in 2018, becoming the first Air Force Reserve officer to reach four-star rank.
  30. ^ For example, the deputy chief of staff for personnel received the designation "G-1", replacing the outgoing acronym "DCSPERS".
  31. ^ Legislative history compiled from the U.S. Congress official website and U.S. Government Publishing Office official website.
  32. ^ Request not acted on by the President.
  33. ^ Refers to the United States Northern Command (USNORTHCOM).