Darryl Talley and Oliver Luck celebrate WVU's 1981 Peach Bowl victory
Darryl Talley and Oliver Luck celebrate WVU's 1981 Peach Bowl victory

The West Virginia Mountaineers college football team competes as part of the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), representing the West Virginia University in the Big 12 Conference (Big 12). Since the establishment of the team in 1891, West Virginia University has appeared in 38 bowl games.[1] Included in these games are three appearances in the Sugar Bowl, two in the Fiesta Bowl and one in the Orange Bowl.[1][2] Throughout the history of the program, eleven separate coaches have led the Mountaineers to bowl games with Don Nehlen having the most appearances (13). West Virginia's overall bowl record is 16–22.

The 2008 Meineke Car Care Bowl between WVU and North Carolina

Key

Bowl games

List of bowl games showing bowl played in, score, date, season, opponent, stadium, location, attendance, head coach and MVP[A 1]
# Bowl Score[A 2] Date Season[A 3] Opponent[A 4] Stadium Location Attendance[3] Head coach MVP
1 San Diego East-West Christmas Classic W 21–13 December 25, 1922 1922 Gonzaga Bulldogs Balboa Stadium San Diego N/A Clarence Spears
2 Sun Bowl W 7–6 January 1, 1938 1937 Texas Tech Red Raiders Kidd Field El Paso 12,000double-dagger Marshall Glenn
3 Sun Bowl W 21–12 January 1, 1949 1948 Texas Mines Miners Kidd Field El Paso 13,000 Dudley DeGroot
4 Sugar Bowl L 19–42 January 1, 1954 1953 No. 8 Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets Tulane Stadium New Orleans 76,000 Art Lewis
5 Liberty Bowl L 6–32 December 19, 1964 1964 Utah Utes Boardwalk Hall Atlantic City 6,059double-dagger Gene Corum
6 Peach Bowl W 14–3 December 30, 1969 1969 South Carolina Gamecocks Grant Field Atlanta 48,452double-dagger Jim Carlen Eddie Williams (FB)
7 Peach Bowl L 13–49 December 29, 1972 1972 NC State Wolfpack Atlanta Stadium Atlanta 52,671double-dagger Bobby Bowden
8 Peach Bowl W 13–10 December 31, 1975 1975 NC State Wolfpack Atlanta Stadium Atlanta 45,134 Bobby Bowden Ray Marshall (LB)
9 Peach Bowl W 26–6 December 31, 1981 1981 Florida Gators Atlanta–Fulton County Stadium Atlanta 37,582 Don Nehlen Mickey Walczack (RB),
Don Stemple (DB)
10 Gator Bowl L 12–31 December 30, 1982 1982 Florida State Seminoles Gator Bowl Jacksonville 80,913double-dagger Don Nehlen Paul Woodside (K)
11 Hall of Fame Classic Bowl W 20–16 December 22, 1983 1983 Kentucky Wildcats Legion Field Birmingham 42,000 Don Nehlen Jeff Hostetler (QB)
12 Bluebonnet Bowl W 31–14 December 31, 1984 1984 TCU Horned Frogs Astrodome Houston 43,260 Don Nehlen Willie Drewrey (WR)
13 Sun Bowl L 33–35 December 25, 1987 1987 No. 11 Oklahoma State Cowboys Sun Bowl El Paso 43,240 Don Nehlen
14 Fiesta Bowl L 21–34 January 2, 1989 1988 No. 1 Notre Dame Fighting Irish Sun Devil Stadium Tempe 74,911double-dagger Don Nehlen
15 Gator Bowl L 7–27 December 30, 1989 1989 No. 14 Clemson Tigers Gator Bowl Jacksonville 82,911double-dagger Don Nehlen Mike Fox (LB)
16 Sugar Bowl L 7–41 January 1, 1994 1993 No. 8 Florida Gators Louisiana Superdome New Orleans 75,437 Don Nehlen
17 Carquest Bowl[A 5] L 21–24 January 2, 1995 1994 South Carolina Gamecocks Joe Robbie Stadium[A 6] Miami Gardens 50,833 Don Nehlen
18 Gator Bowl L 13–20 January 1, 1997 1996 No. 12 North Carolina Tar Heels Alltel Stadium[A 7] Jacksonville 52,103 Don Nehlen David Saunders (WR)
19 Carquest Bowl[A 5] L 30–35 December 29, 1997 1997 Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets Pro Player Stadium[A 6] Miami Gardens 28,262 Don Nehlen
20 Insight.com Bowl L 31–34 December 26, 1998 1998 No. 23 Missouri Tigers Arizona Stadium Tucson 36,147 Don Nehlen Marc Bulger (QB)
21 Music City Bowl W 49–38 December 28, 2000 2000 Ole Miss Rebels Adelphia Coliseum Nashville 47,119 Don Nehlen Brad Lewis (QB)
22 Continental Tire Bowl[A 8] L 22–48 December 28, 2002 2002 Virginia Cavaliers Ericsson Stadium[A 9] Charlotte 73,535double-dagger Rich Rodriguez
23 Gator Bowl L 7–41 January 1, 2004 2003 No. 23 Maryland Terrapins Alltel Stadium[A 7] Jacksonville 78,892 Rich Rodriguez Brian King (DB)
24 Gator Bowl L 18–30 January 1, 2005 2004 No. 17 Florida State Seminoles Alltel Stadium[A 7] Jacksonville 70,112 Rich Rodriguez Kay-Jay Harris (RB)
25 Sugar Bowl[A 10] W 38–35 January 2, 2006 2005 No. 8 Georgia Bulldogs Georgia Dome Atlanta 74,458 Rich Rodriguez Steve Slaton (RB)
26 Gator Bowl W 38–35 January 1, 2007 2006 Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets Jacksonville Municipal Stadium[A 7] Jacksonville 67,704 Rich Rodriguez Pat White (QB)
27 Fiesta Bowl W 48–28 January 2, 2008 2007 No. 3 Oklahoma Sooners University of Phoenix Stadium Glendale 70,016 Bill Stewart* Pat White (QB),
Reed Williams (LB)
28 Meineke Car Care Bowl[A 8] W 31–30 December 27, 2008 2008 North Carolina Tar Heels Bank of America Stadium[A 9] Charlotte 73,712dagger Bill Stewart Pat White (QB)
29 Gator Bowl L 21–33 January 1, 2010 2009 Florida State Seminoles Jacksonville Municipal Stadium[A 7] Jacksonville 84,129dagger Bill Stewart Noel Devine (RB)
30 Champs Sports Bowl L 7–23 December 28, 2010 2010 NC State Wolfpack Florida Citrus Bowl Orlando 48,962 Bill Stewart
31 Orange Bowl W 70–33 January 4, 2012 2011 No. 14 Clemson Tigers Sun Life Stadium[A 6] Miami Gardens 67,563 Dana Holgorsen Geno Smith (QB)
32 Pinstripe Bowl L 14–38 December 29, 2012 2012 Syracuse Orange Yankee Stadium Bronx 39,098double-dagger Dana Holgorsen
33 Liberty Bowl L 37–45 December 29, 2014 2014 Texas A&M Aggies Liberty Bowl Stadium Memphis 51,282 Dana Holgorsen
34 Cactus Bowl W 43–42 January 2, 2016 2015 Arizona State Sun Devils Chase Field Phoenix 39,321 Dana Holgorsen Skyler Howard (QB),
Shaq Petteway (LB)
35 Russell Athletic Bowl L 14–31 December 28, 2016 2016 Miami Hurricanes Camping World Stadium Orlando 48,625 Dana Holgorsen
36 Heart of Dallas Bowl L 14–30 December 26, 2017 2017 Utah Utes Cotton Bowl Dallas 20,507 Dana Holgorsen
37 Camping World Bowl L 18–34 December 28, 2018 2018 No. 17 Syracuse Orange Camping World Stadium Orlando 41,125 Dana Holgorsen
38 Liberty Bowl W 24–21 December 31, 2020 2020 Army Black Knights Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium Memphis Neal Brown

Notes

  1. ^ Statistics correct as of 2011–12 NCAA football bowl games.
  2. ^ Results are sortable first by whether the result was a West Virginia win, loss or tie and then second by the margin of victory.
  3. ^ Links to the season article for the West Virginia team that competed in the bowl for that year.
  4. ^ Links to the season article for the opponent that West Virginia competed against in the bowl for that year when available or to their general page when unavailable.
  5. ^ a b The Champs Sports Bowl has been known as: the Blockbuster Bowl (1990–1993); Carquest Bowl (1994–1997); Micron PC Bowl (1998); MicronPC.com Bowl (1999–2000); Visit Florida Tangerine Bowl (2001); Mazda Tangerine Bowl (2002–2003); Champs Sports Bowl (since 2004).[4]
  6. ^ a b c Originally called Joe Robbie Stadium, in 1996 it was renamed Pro Player Stadium after naming rights were sold, and it retained the Pro Player moniker through the 2005 season. Today it is known as Sun Life Stadium.[5][6]
  7. ^ a b c d e Originally called Alltel Stadium (1997–2006) and Jacksonville Municipal Stadium (1995–1996, 2007–2009), in 2010 it was renamed EverBank Field.[7]
  8. ^ a b The Belk Bowl has been known as: the Continental Tire Bowl (2002–2004) and the Meineke Car Care Bowl (2005–2010).[8]
  9. ^ a b Originally called Ericsson Stadium, in 2004 it was renamed Bank of America Stadium.[9]
  10. ^ The 2006 Sugar Bowl was played at the Georgia Dome in Atlanta due to lingering effects of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans and the Louisiana Superdome.[10]

References

General
Specific
  1. ^ a b Bowl/All-Star Game Records, p. 29
  2. ^ Bowl/All-Star Game Records, p. 31
  3. ^ Bowl/All-Star Game Records, pp. 32–38
  4. ^ Bowl/All-Star Game Records, p. 9
  5. ^ "Joe Robbie gets a name change". TimesDaily. Florence, Alabama. August 26, 1996. Retrieved December 18, 2011.
  6. ^ Lefton, Terry (January 18, 2010). "Dolphins sell stadium naming rights to Sun Life". South Florida Business Journal. bizjournals.com. Retrieved December 18, 2011.
  7. ^ "EverBank puts name on Jags' stadium". ESPN.com. Associated Press. July 27, 2010. Retrieved December 18, 2011.
  8. ^ Bowl/All-Star Game Records, p. 10
  9. ^ Spanberg, Erik (January 16, 2004). "Panthers sign BofA for stadium naming rights". Charlotte Business Journal. Retrieved December 18, 2011.
  10. ^ Bowl/All-Star Game Records, p. 33