Twenty-four known prisoner-of-war camps existed across Canada during World War I. The ethnic groups arrested and detained in internment camps were Austro-Hungarians (mostly Ukrainians) and Germans. Austro-Hungarian Prisoners were mainly residents of Canada from Ukraine, part of Serbia, the Czech Republic, Slovakia. Since Ukraine, part of Serbia, the Czech Republic and Slovakia were then provinces of the empire of Austria-Hungary, many still had Austro-Hungarian citizenship and were considered to be resident enemy aliens. William Dostock, for example, who immigrated to Canada in 1910 from Austria-Hungary and was not yet naturalized was interned from 1915–1920 as an enemy alien.[1]

German prisoners were mainly residents of Canada from Germany. Germans formed a large proportion of the detainees since Canada served as a place of detention for German prisoners of war on behalf of the British.[1]

The prisoners were given various tasks; many worked in the forests as logging crews. In addition to the main camps, there were branch camps and labour camps.

Camp Location Province Type of Buildings Period
Amherst Internment Camp Amherst Nova Scotia Malleable Iron Foundry April 1915 to September 1919
Beauport Quebec The Armoury December 1914 to June 1916
Castle Mountain Internment Camp Banff & Castle Mountain Alberta Dominion Park July 1915 to July 1917
Brandon Manitoba Exhibition Building September 1914 to July 1916
Edgewood British Columbia Bunk Houses August 1915 to September 1916
Fernie & Morrissey British Columbia Rented premises June 1915 to October 1918
Halifax Nova Scotia Halifax Citadel September 1914 to October 1918
Jasper Alberta Dominion Park February 1916 to August 1916
Kapuskasing, Ontario Ontario Bunk Houses December 1914 to February 1920
Kingston, Ontario Ontario Fort Henry August 1914 to November 1917
Lethbridge Alberta Exhibition Building September 1914 to November 1916
Monashee & Mara Lake British Columbia Tents and Bunkhouses June 1915 to July 1917
Montreal Quebec Immigration Hall August 1914 to November 1918
Eaton Internment Camp Munson & Eaton Alberta Railway Cars October 1918 to March 1919
Nanaimo British Columbia Provincial government building September 1914 to September 1915
Niagara Falls Ontario The Armoury December 1914 to August 1918
Petawawa Ontario Militia Camp December 1914 to May 1916
Revelstoke & Field & Otter British Columbia Bunk Houses September 1915 to October 1916
Sault Ste. Marie Ontario The Armoury January 1915 to January 1918
Spirit Lake Spirit Lake Quebec Bunk Houses January 1915 to January 1917
Toronto Ontario Stanley Barracks December 1914 to October 1916
Winnipeg Manitoba Fort Osborne September 1914 to July 1916
Valcartier Quebec Militia Camp April 1915 to October 1915
Vernon British Columbia Provincial government building September 1914 to February 1920

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See also

References

  1. ^ a b c "Internment Camps in Canada during the First and Second World Wars". Library and Archives Canada. Retrieved 5 September 2014.