Monument Valley, located on the Navajo Nation within Arizona and Utah, has been featured in many forms of media since the 1930s. It is perhaps most famous for its use in many John Ford films, such as Stagecoach (1939) and The Searchers (1956). It has also been featured in such films as Easy Rider (1969), directed by and co-starring Dennis Hopper; Forrest Gump (1994), directed by Robert Zemeckis, and The Eiger Sanction (1972), directed by and starring Clint Eastwood; and in two episodes of the popular United Kingdom television show Doctor Who: "The Impossible Astronaut" (23 April 2011) and "Day of the Moon" (30 April 2011).

The twin buttes of Monument Valley ("the Mittens"), the "Totem Pole", and the Ear of the Wind arch, among other features, have developed iconic status. They have appeared in many television programs, commercials, and Hollywood movies, especially Westerns.[citation needed]

Monument Valley Panorama, taken from the Visitor Center and showing the "Mittens" and the road which makes a loop-tour through the Park
Monument Valley Panorama, taken from the Visitor Center and showing the "Mittens" and the road which makes a loop-tour through the Park

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John Ford's Point in Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park.
John Ford's Point in Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park.

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References

  1. ^ Paramount Pictures. "Monument Valley in the movies". CBS News. CBS Interactive Inc. p. 5. Retrieved 11 February 2019.
  2. ^ Phipps, Keith (November 17, 2009). "The Easy Rider Road Trip". Slate. Retrieved December 16, 2012.
  3. ^ Howze, William (September 2, 2011). "Ford's consistent use of popular imagery in Western and Non-Western films". The Influence of Western Painting and Genre Painting on the Films of John Ford (Revised ed.).
  4. ^ Punch, David A. (September 2, 2018). "Stagecoach: Defining the Western How John Ford's 1939 western classic transformed the dying genre into the epitome of American cinema". Medium.
  5. ^ Movshovitz, Howard (1984). "The Still Point: Women in the Westerns of John Ford". Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies. University of Nebraska Press. 7 (3, Women on the Western Frontier): 68–72. doi:10.2307/3346245. JSTOR 3346245.
  6. ^ Darby, Ken. Hollywood Holyland The Filming and Scoring of The Greatest Story Ever Told. Rowman and Littlefield. The late Ken Darby, a three-time winner for musical adaptation, presents a behind- the-camera portrait of the late George Stevens' 1965 "Holyland", which he built in Utah's Monument Valley in order to film The Greatest Story Ever Told: 160 prefab aluminum bungalows housed over 400 artisans, actors, and technicians