John Tyler
John Tyler

Following is a list of all Article III United States federal judges appointed by President John Tyler during his presidency.[1] In total Tyler appointed 7 Article III federal judges, including 1 Justice to the Supreme Court of the United States and 6 judges to the United States district courts.

Two vacancies occurred on the Supreme Court during Tyler's presidency, as Justices Smith Thompson and Henry Baldwin died in 1843 and 1844, respectively. Tyler put forward five men for Supreme Court confirmation a total of nine times. John C. Spencer, Reuben Walworth, Edward King all had their nominations scuttled more than once, and the full Senate never acted on John M. Read's nomination.[2] Tyler's four unsuccessful nominees are the most for any U.S. president to date.[3]

United States Supreme Court justices

# Justice Seat State Former justice Nomination
date
Confirmation
date
Began
active service
Ended
active service
1 Samuel Nelson 1 New York Smith Thompson February 4, 1845 February 14, 1845 February 13, 1845 November 28, 1872

District courts

# Judge Court
[Note 1]
Nomination
date
Confirmation
date
Began active
service
Ended active
service
1 Peleg Sprague D. Mass. July 15, 1841 July 16, 1841 July 16, 1841 March 13, 1865
2 Theodore Howard McCaleb E.D. La.
W.D. La.
September 1, 1841 September 3, 1841 September 3, 1841 January 28, 1861[4]
3 Archibald Randall E.D. Pa. March 3, 1842 March 8, 1842 March 8, 1842 June 8, 1846
4 Samuel Prentiss D. Vt. April 8, 1842 April 8, 1842 April 8, 1842 January 15, 1857
5 Elisha Mills Huntington D. Ind. April 26, 1842 May 2, 1842 May 2, 1842 October 26, 1862
6 James Dandridge Halyburton E.D. Va. June 15, 1844 June 15, 1844 June 15, 1844 April 24, 1861

Notes

References

General
  • "Judges of the United States Courts". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Federal Judicial Center. Archived from the original on 2016-07-30. Retrieved 2009-04-03.
Specific
  1. ^ All information on the names, terms of service, and details of appointment of federal judges is derived from the Biographical Directory of Federal Judges, a public-domain publication of the Federal Judicial Center.
  2. ^ "Supreme Court Nomination Battles: Tyler's Failures". Time Magazine. Retrieved February 10, 2017.
  3. ^ "Supreme Court Nominations, present–1789". United States Senate Reference. United States Senate. Retrieved April 27, 2014.
  4. ^ Reassigned by operation of law to the United States District Court for the District of Louisiana on February 13, 1845. Reassigned by operation of law to the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana on March 3, 1849.

Sources