U.S. maple syrup, Grade A varieties, left to right: Golden Colour and Delicate Taste, Amber Color and Rich Taste, Dark Color and Robust Taste, Very Dark Color and Strong Taste.
U.S. maple syrup, Grade A varieties, left to right: Golden Colour and Delicate Taste, Amber Color and Rich Taste, Dark Color and Robust Taste, Very Dark Color and Strong Taste.

Several food products are created from the sap harvested from maple trees, which is made into sugar and syrup before being incorporated into various foods and dishes. The sugar maple is one of the most important Canadian trees, being, along with the black maple, the major source of sap for making maple syrup.[1] Other maple species can be used as a sap source for maple syrup, but some have lower sugar contents or produce more cloudy syrup than these two.[1]

Foods made from maple

Beverages

Baked goods

Gallery

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Heilingmann, Randall B. "Hobby Maple Syrup Production (F-36-02)". Ohio State University.
  2. ^ "How to tap maple trees and make maple syrup Archived 2008-11-18 at the Wayback Machine. University of Maine, Cooperative extension. Bulletin #7036.
  3. ^ Maple Sugar | baking911.com Archived 2008-07-20 at the Wayback Machine
  4. ^ Weshki-Ayaad, Lippert and Gambill. Ojibwe-English and English-Ojibwe online dictionary.
  5. ^ Clark, William Horace (1938). Ships and Sailors: The Story of Our Merchant Marine. Boston: L.C. Page & Co. pp. 15–17.
  6. ^ Geary, Andrea. "How to Make Maple Cream". americastestkitchenfeed.com. Archived from the original on 23 September 2013. Retrieved 27 May 2021.
  7. ^ "The Sweet Rewards of Maple Beers". All About Beer. 2015-06-26. Retrieved 2019-03-24.
  8. ^ a b "10 Things Made from Maple Syrup". mentalfloss.com. 2016-07-01. Retrieved 2019-03-24.
  9. ^ 500 Things to Eat Before It's Too Late: and the Very Best Places to Eat Them - Jane Stern, Michael Stern. p. 382.