Governor of Mississippi
Incumbent
Tate Reeves
since January 14, 2020
Style
Status
ResidenceMississippi Governor's Mansion
Term lengthFour years, renewable once
FormationConstitution of Mississippi
SuccessionEvery four years, unless reelected
DeputyLieutenant Governor of Mississippi
Salary$122,160[1]
Websitegovernor.ms.gov

The governor of Mississippi is the head of government of Mississippi[2] and the commander-in-chief of the state's military forces.[2] The governor has a duty to enforce state laws,[3] and the power to either approve or veto bills passed by the Mississippi Legislature,[4] to convene the legislature at any time,[5] and, except in cases of treason or impeachment, to grant pardons and reprieves.[6]

To be elected governor, a person must be at least 30 years old, and must have been a citizen of the United States for twenty years and a resident of Mississippi for at least five years at the time of inauguration.[7] The Constitution of Mississippi, ratified in 1890, calls for a four-year term for the governor, elected via the two-round system since a 2020 referendum. Prior to this, the governor was elected by an electoral college composed of the districts represented in the Mississippi House of Representatives, with a contingent election held in the House in the event no candidate received a majority of district electors. The term length was originally two years,[8] with no limit on how many terms they could serve. The 1832 constitution limited governors to serving no more than four out of every six years.[9] When terms were lengthened to four years in 1868,[10] this limit was removed. The 1890 constitution forbid governors from succeeding themselves, but a 1986 amendment allows them to succeed themselves once.[2][11] The office of the lieutenant governor was created in the 1817 constitution, officially abolished in 1832, and recreated in 1868. When the office of governor becomes vacant for any reason, the lieutenant governor exercises the powers of governor for the remainder of the term.[12] The governor and the lieutenant governor are not officially elected on the same ticket.

The current governor is Republican Tate Reeves, who took office January 14, 2020.

List of governors

Mississippi Territory

Mississippi Territory was organized on April 7, 1798, from land ceded to the federal government by Georgia.[13] It had four governors appointed by the president of the United States during its 19-year history, including one, David Holmes, who would later serve as state governor.

Governors of Mississippi Territory
No. Governor Term in office[a] Appointed by
1 Winthrop Sargent
(1753–1820)
[14]
May 7, 1798[b]

May 25, 1801
(successor appointed)
John Adams
2 William C. C. Claiborne
(d. 1817)
[18]
May 25, 1801[c]

March 2, 1805
(successor appointed)
Thomas Jefferson
3 Robert Williams
(1770–1836)
[22]
March 2, 1805[d]

March 7, 1809
(successor appointed)
Thomas Jefferson
4 David Holmes
(1769–1832)
[26][27][28]
March 7, 1809[e]

October 7, 1817
(elected state governor)
James Madison

State of Mississippi

Mississippi was admitted to the Union on December 10, 1817.[33] It seceded from the Union on January 9, 1861,[34] and was a founding member of the Confederate States of America on February 4, 1861.[35] Following the end of the American Civil War, Mississippi during Reconstruction was part of the Fourth Military District, which exerted some control over governor appointments and elections. Mississippi was readmitted to the Union on February 23, 1870.[36]

Governors of the State of Mississippi
No. Governor Term in office Party Election Lt. Governor[f][g]
1   David Holmes
(1769–1832)
[26][27][28]
October 7, 1817[37]

January 5, 1820
(did not run)
Democratic-
Republican
[38]
1817   Duncan Stewart
2 George Poindexter
(1779–1853)
[39][40]
January 5, 1820[41]

January 7, 1822
(did not run)
Democratic-
Republican
[38]
1819 James Patton
3 Walter Leake
(1762–1825)
[42][43]
January 7, 1822[37]

November 17, 1825
(died in office)
Democratic-
Republican
[38]
1821 David C. Dickson
1823 Gerard Brandon
4 Gerard Brandon
(1788–1850)
[44][45]
November 17, 1825[37]

January 7, 1826
(successor took office)
Democratic-
Republican
[38]
Lieutenant
governor
acting
Acting as governor
5 David Holmes
(1769–1832)
[26][27][28]
January 7, 1826[46]

July 25, 1826
(resigned)[h]
Democratic-
Republican
[38]
1825 Gerard Brandon
6 Gerard Brandon
(1788–1850)
[44][45]
July 25, 1826[47]

January 9, 1832
(did not run)
Democratic-
Republican
[38]
Lieutenant
governor
acting
Acting as governor
1827 Abram M. Scott[i]
1829
7 Abram M. Scott
(1785–1833)
[48][49]
January 9, 1832[37]

June 12, 1833
(died in office)
National
Republican
[38]
1831 Fountain Winston[j]
(office abolished
October 26, 1832)
Office did not exist
8 Charles Lynch
(1783–1853)
[50][51]
June 12, 1833[37]

November 21, 1833
(successor took office)
Whig[k] President of
the Senate
acting
9 Hiram Runnels
(1796–1857)
[53][54]
November 21, 1833[l]

November 21, 1835
(lost election)[m]
Democratic[52] 1833
10 John A. Quitman
(1798–1858)
[57][58]
December 3, 1835[59]

January 7, 1836
(successor took office)
Democratic[52] President of
the Senate
acting
11 Charles Lynch
(1783–1853)
[50][51]
January 7, 1836[60]

January 8, 1838
(did not run)
Whig[52] 1835
12 Alexander G. McNutt
(1802–1848)
[61][62]
January 8, 1838[63]

January 9, 1842
(term-limited)[n][o]
Democratic[52] 1837
1839
13 Tilghman Tucker
(1802–1859)
[66][67]
January 10, 1842[64]

January 10, 1844
(lost nomination)[68]
Democratic[52] 1841
14 Albert G. Brown
(1813–1880)
[68][69]
January 10, 1844[70]

January 10, 1848
(term-limited)[o]
Democratic[52] 1843
1845
15 Joseph W. Matthews
(1812–1862)
[71][72]
January 10, 1848[73]

January 10, 1850
(did not run)[71]
Democratic[52] 1847
16 John A. Quitman
(1798–1858)
[57][58]
January 10, 1850[74]

February 3, 1851
(resigned)[p]
Democratic[52] 1849
17 John Isaac Guion
(1802–1855)
[75][76]
February 3, 1851[77]

November 4, 1851
(senate term expired)[q]
Democratic[52] President of
the Senate
acting
18 James Whitfield
(1791–1875)
[78][79]
November 25, 1851[r]

January 10, 1852
(successor took office)
Democratic[52] President of
the Senate
acting
19 Henry S. Foote
(1804–1880)
[81][82]
January 10, 1852[83]

January 5, 1854
(resigned)[s]
Union[52]
(Democratic)
1851
20 John J. Pettus
(1813–1867)
[84][85]
January 5, 1854[86]

January 10, 1854
(successor took office)
Democratic[52] President of
the Senate
acting
21 John J. McRae
(1815–1868)
[87][88]
January 10, 1854[89]

November 16, 1857
(term-limited)[o]
Democratic[52] 1853
1855
22 William McWillie
(1795–1869)
[90][91]
November 16, 1857[92]

November 21, 1859
(did not run)
Democratic[52] 1857
23 John J. Pettus
(1813–1867)
[84][85]
November 21, 1859[93]

November 16, 1863
(term-limited)[t]
Democratic[52] 1859
1861
24 Charles Clark
(1811–1877)
[95][96]
November 16, 1863[97]

May 22, 1865
(arrested and removed)[u]
Democratic[52] 1863
25 William L. Sharkey
(1798–1873)
[98][99]
June 13, 1865[100]

October 16, 1865
(successor took office)[v]
Provisional governor
appointed by President
26 Benjamin G. Humphreys
(1808–1882)
[101][104]
October 16, 1865[105]

June 15, 1868
(removed)[w]
Non-partisan[x] 1865
27 Adelbert Ames
(1835–1933)
[106][107]
June 15, 1868[108]

March 10, 1870
(state readmitted)[y]
Provisional governor
appointed by military occupation
[106]
28 James L. Alcorn
(1816–1894)
[109][110]
March 10, 1870[111]

November 30, 1871
(resigned)[z]
Republican[52] 1869 Ridgley C. Powers
29 Ridgley C. Powers
(1836–1912)
[112][113]
November 30, 1871[114]

January 22, 1874
(successor took office)
Republican[52] Lieutenant
governor
acting
Acting as governor
30 Adelbert Ames
(1835–1933)
[106][107]
January 22, 1874[115]

March 29, 1876
(resigned)[aa]
Republican[52] 1873 Alexander Kelso Davis
(impeached and removed)
Vacant
31 John Marshall Stone
(1830–1900)
[116][117]
March 29, 1876[118]

January 9, 1882
(lost nomination)[116]
Democratic[52] President of
the Senate
acting
1877 William H. Sims
32 Robert Lowry
(1829–1910)
[119][120]
January 9, 1882[121]

January 13, 1890
(did not run)
Democratic[52] 1881 G. D. Shands
1885
33 John Marshall Stone
(1830–1900)
[116][117]
January 13, 1890[122]

January 21, 1896
(term-limited)[ab]
Democratic[52] 1889 M. M. Evans
34 Anselm J. McLaurin
(1848–1909)
[124][125]
January 21, 1896[126]

January 16, 1900
(term-limited)[ab]
Democratic[52] 1895 J. H. Jones
35 Andrew H. Longino
(1854–1942)
[127][128]
January 16, 1900[129]

January 19, 1904
(term-limited)[ab]
Democratic[52] 1899 James T. Harrison
36 James K. Vardaman
(1861–1930)
[130][131]
January 19, 1904[132]

January 21, 1908
(term-limited)[ab]
Democratic[52] 1903 John Prentiss Carter
37 Edmond Noel
(1856–1927)
[133][134]
January 21, 1908[135]

January 16, 1912
(term-limited)[ab]
Democratic[52] 1907 Luther Manship
38 Earl L. Brewer
(1869–1942)
[136][137]
January 16, 1912[138]

January 18, 1916
(term-limited)[ab]
Democratic[52] 1911 Theodore G. Bilbo
39 Theodore G. Bilbo
(1877–1947)
[139][140]
January 18, 1916[141]

January 18, 1920
(term-limited)[ab]
Democratic[52] 1915 Lee M. Russell
40 Lee M. Russell
(1875–1943)
[142][143]
January 20, 1920[144]

January 22, 1924
(term-limited)[ab]
Democratic[52] 1919 Homer Casteel
41 Henry L. Whitfield
(1868–1927)
[145][146]
January 22, 1924[147]

March 18, 1927
(died in office)
Democratic[52] 1923 Dennis Murphree
42 Dennis Murphree
(1886–1949)
[148][149]
March 18, 1927[150]

January 17, 1928
(lost nomination)
Democratic[52] Lieutenant
governor
acting
Acting as governor
43 Theodore G. Bilbo
(1877–1947)
[139][140]
January 17, 1928[151]

January 19, 1932
(term-limited)[ab]
Democratic[52] 1927 Bidwell Adam
44 Martin Sennet Conner
(1891–1950)
[152][153]
January 19, 1932[154]

January 21, 1936
(term-limited)[ab]
Democratic[52] 1931 Dennis Murphree
45 Hugh L. White
(1881–1965)
[155][156]
January 21, 1936[157]

January 16, 1940
(term-limited)[ab]
Democratic[52] 1935 Jacob Buehler Snider
46 Paul B. Johnson Sr.
(1880–1943)
[158][159]
January 16, 1940[160]

December 26, 1943
(died in office)
Democratic[52] 1939 Dennis Murphree
47 Dennis Murphree
(1886–1949)
[148][149]
December 26, 1943[161]

January 18, 1944
(successor took office)
Democratic[52] Lieutenant
governor
acting
Acting as governor
48 Thomas L. Bailey
(1888–1946)
[162][163]
January 18, 1944[164]

November 2, 1946
(died in office)
Democratic[52] 1943 Fielding L. Wright
49 Fielding L. Wright[ac]
(1895–1956)
[165][166]
November 2, 1946[167]

January 22, 1952
(term-limited)[ab]
Democratic[52] Lieutenant
governor
acting
Acting as governor
50 1947 Sam Lumpkin
51 Hugh L. White
(1881–1965)
[155][156]
January 22, 1952[168]

January 17, 1956
(term-limited)[ab]
Democratic[52] 1951 Carroll Gartin
52 James P. Coleman
(1914–1991)
[169][170]
January 17, 1956[171]

January 19, 1960
(term-limited)[ab]
Democratic[52] 1955
53 Ross Barnett
(1898–1987)
[172][173]
January 19, 1960[174]

January 21, 1964
(term-limited)[ab]
Democratic[52] 1959 Paul B. Johnson Jr.
54 Paul B. Johnson Jr.
(1916–1985)
[175][176]
January 21, 1964[177]

January 16, 1968
(term-limited)[ab]
Democratic[52] 1963 Carroll Gartin
(died December 19, 1966)
Vacant
55 John Bell Williams
(1918–1983)
[178][179]
January 16, 1968[180]

January 18, 1972
(term-limited)[ab]
Democratic[52] 1967 Charles L. Sullivan
56 Bill Waller
(1926–2011)
[181][182]
January 18, 1972[183]

January 20, 1976
(term-limited)[ab]
Democratic[52] 1971 William F. Winter
57 Cliff Finch
(1927–1986)
[184][185]
January 20, 1976[186]

January 22, 1980
(term-limited)[ab]
Democratic[52] 1975 Evelyn Gandy
58 William F. Winter
(1923–2020)
[187]
January 22, 1980[188]

January 10, 1984
(term-limited)[ab]
Democratic[187] 1979 Brad Dye
59 William Allain
(1928–2013)
[189]
January 10, 1984[190]

January 12, 1988
(did not run)
Democratic[189] 1983
60 Ray Mabus
(b. 1948)
[191]
January 12, 1988[192]

January 14, 1992
(lost election)
Democratic[191] 1987
61 Kirk Fordice
(1934–2004)
[193]
January 14, 1992[194]

January 11, 2000
(term-limited)[ad]
Republican[193] 1991 Eddie Briggs
1995 Ronnie Musgrove
62 Ronnie Musgrove
(b. 1956)
[196]
January 11, 2000[197]

January 13, 2004
(lost election)
Democratic[196] 1999 Amy Tuck[ae]
63 Haley Barbour
(b. 1947)
[199]
January 13, 2004[200]

January 10, 2012
(term-limited)[ad]
Republican[199] 2003
2007 Phil Bryant
64 Phil Bryant
(b. 1954)
[201]
January 10, 2012[202]

January 14, 2020
(term-limited)[ad]
Republican[201] 2011 Tate Reeves
2015
65 Tate Reeves
(b. 1974)
[203]
January 14, 2020[204]

Incumbent[af]
Republican[203] 2019 Delbert Hosemann
2023

See also

Notes

  1. ^ The range given is from the date the governor was confirmed by the Senate, or appointed by the President during a Senate recess, to the date the governor left office.
  2. ^ George Mathews was nominated on April 18, 1798,[15] but was withdrawn and Sargent nominated on May 2.[16] He was confirmed by the Senate on May 7,[17] and arrived in the territory on August 6.[14]
  3. ^ Claiborne was appointed on May 25, 1801,[19] during a Senate recess; nominated on January 6, 1802;[20] and confirmed by the Senate on January 26, 1802.[21] He arrived in the territory on November 23, 1801.[18]
  4. ^ Williams was nominated on March 1, 1805;[23] confirmed by the Senate on March 2;[24] and he arrived in the territory in May.[22] He was reconfirmed by the Senate on March 14, 1808.[25]
  5. ^ Holmes was nominated on March 6, 1809;[29] confirmed by the Senate on March 7;[30] and he arrived in the territory on June 30.[26] He was reconfirmed by the Senate on March 31, 1812,[31] and December 10, 1814.[32]
  6. ^ The office of lieutenant governor was created in 1817, abolished in 1832, and recreated in 1868.
  7. ^ Lieutenant governors represented the same party as their governor unless noted.
  8. ^ Holmes resigned due to ill health.[27]
  9. ^ Represented the National Republican Party
  10. ^ Represented no party
  11. ^ Lynch is labeled a Whig by Kallenbach[52] and a Democratic-Republican by Glashan.[38]
  12. ^ All sources, modern and older, say Runnels took office on November 20; however, contemporary news shows he was inaugurated on November 21.[55][56]
  13. ^ The 1832 constitution specified that governor "shall hold his office for two years from the time of his installation;" thus, on November 21, 1835, two years after he took office, Runnels, having lost the 1835 election, left office. However, the legislature had set the start of the next term in January. The Senate met on December 3 and elected a new president, Quitman, who would act as governor until the governor-elect, Lynch, took office.[57]
  14. ^ McNutt's term constitutionally could only last two years, so on January 9, he left office and President of the Senate Jesse Speight became acting governor for one day.[64]
  15. ^ a b c Under the 1832 constitution, governors were ineligible to hold the office for more than four years in any term of six years.[65]
  16. ^ Quitman resigned after being arrested for his involvement in the Lopez Expedition; he was later acquitted.[57]
  17. ^ All senate terms ended on November 4; Secretary of State of Mississippi Joseph Bell acted as chief executive until the senate could convene and elect a new president.[75]
  18. ^ All modern sources say Whitfield took office November 24;[37] however, contemporary news reports say the final vote was the next morning.[80]
  19. ^ Foote resigned due to tensions resolving around secession.[81]
  20. ^ Under the 1861 constitution, governors were ineligible to hold the office for more than four years in any term of six years.[94]
  21. ^ Clark was arrested by Union forces.[95]
  22. ^ Humphreys was sworn in on October 16.[101] Sharkey was elected to the Senate on October 19, Humphreys signed his credentials on October 31, and Sharkey presented them to the United States Senate on December 12,[102] though he was refused his seat.[98] However, some reputable sources say Sharkey remained in office until December, when President Andrew Johnson ordered him to turn over power to Humphreys.[103]
  23. ^ Humphreys was removed by federal forces and replaced with a military governor after his failure to comply with the Reconstruction Acts.[101]
  24. ^ The 1865 election was officially non-partisan.[101]
  25. ^ Mississippi was readmitted to Congress on February 23, 1870, and Ames was elected to the United States Senate that same day. He left office upon the inauguration of James Alcorn.[106]
  26. ^ Alcorn resigned, having been elected to the United States Senate; his senate term had begun on March 4, 1871, but he delayed taking it.[109]
  27. ^ Ames resigned under threat of impeachment from the newly-elected Democratic legislature.[106]
  28. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t Under the 1890 constitution, governors were ineligible to be their immediate successor.[123]
  29. ^ Mississippi numbers Wright as both the 49th governor (completing his predecessor's term) and the 50th governor (his own elected term).
  30. ^ a b c Under a 1986 amendment to the constitution, governors are ineligible to be elected more than twice.[195]
  31. ^ Tuck switched her party membership to the Republican Party in 2002.[198]
  32. ^ Reeves' second term began on January 9, 2024, and will expire January 11, 2028; he will be term-limited.

References

General
  • "Former Mississippi Governors". National Governors Association. Retrieved March 13, 2023.
  • McMullin, Thomas A. (1984). Biographical directory of American territorial governors. Westport, CT : Meckler. ISBN 978-0-930466-11-4. Retrieved January 19, 2023.
  • Sobel, Robert (1978). Biographical directory of the governors of the United States, 1789-1978, Vol. II. Meckler Books. ISBN 9780930466008. Retrieved March 6, 2023.
  • Dubin, Michael J. (2003). United States Gubernatorial Elections, 1776-1860: The Official Results by State and County. McFarland. ISBN 978-0-7864-1439-0.
  • Dubin, Michael J. (2014). United States Gubernatorial Elections, 1861-1911: The Official Results by State and County. McFarland. ISBN 978-0-7864-5646-8.
  • Kallenbach, Joseph Ernest (1977). American State Governors, 1776-1976. Oceana Publications. ISBN 978-0-379-00665-0. Retrieved September 23, 2023.
  • Glashan, Roy R. (1979). American Governors and Gubernatorial Elections, 1775-1978. Meckler Books. ISBN 978-0-930466-17-6.
  • "Our Campaigns - Governor of Mississippi - History". www.ourcampaigns.com. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
  • "Our Campaigns - Governor of Mississippi (CSA) - History". www.ourcampaigns.com. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
Specific
  1. ^ Pender, Geoff (April 7, 2022). "Amid vetoes, Gov. Reeves lets pay raises for elected officials pass". Mississippi Today. Nonprofit Mississippi News. Retrieved October 10, 2022.
  2. ^ a b c MS Const. art. V, § 116.
  3. ^ MS Const. art. V, § 123.
  4. ^ MS Const. art. IV, § 72.
  5. ^ MS Const. art. V, § 121.
  6. ^ MS Const. art. V, § 140-141.
  7. ^ MS Const. art. V, § 117.
  8. ^ 1817 art iv sec 1
  9. ^ 1832 art v sec 3
  10. ^ MS Const. (1817) art. IV, § 1; MS Const. (1832) art. V, § 1; MS Const. (1868) art. V, § 1.
  11. ^ "Haley Barbour: Sixty-fourth and Sixty-fifth Governor of Mississippi: 2004-2008; 2008-2012 | Mississippi History Now". www.mshistorynow.mdah.ms.gov. Archived from the original on December 30, 2016.
  12. ^ MS Const. art. V, § 131.
  13. ^ Stat. 549
  14. ^ a b McMullin 1984, pp. 203–204.
  15. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 5th Cong., 2nd sess., 269, accessed March 15, 2023.
  16. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 5th Cong., 2nd sess., 272, accessed March 15, 2023.
  17. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 5th Cong., 2nd sess., 274, accessed March 15, 2023.
  18. ^ a b McMullin 1984, pp. 205–207.
  19. ^ "From Thomas Jefferson to William C. C. Claiborne, 13 July 1801," Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-34-02-0427. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 34, 1 May–31 July 1801, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2007, pp. 560–562.] Accessed March 15, 2023.
  20. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 7th Cong., 1st sess., 401, accessed March 15, 2023.
  21. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 7th Cong., 1st sess., 405, accessed March 15, 2023.
  22. ^ a b McMullin 1984, pp. 207–208.
  23. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 8th Cong., 2nd sess., 484, accessed March 15, 2023.
  24. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 8th Cong., 2nd sess., 485, accessed March 15, 2023.
  25. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 10th Cong., 1st sess., 72, accessed March 15, 2023.
  26. ^ a b c d McMullin 1984, pp. 208–210.
  27. ^ a b c d Sobel 1978, p. 801.
  28. ^ a b c "David Holmes". National Governors Association. Retrieved March 15, 2023.
  29. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 11th Cong., special sess., 119, accessed March 15, 2023.
  30. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 11th Cong., special sess., 120, accessed March 15, 2023.
  31. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 12th Cong., 1st sess., 242, accessed March 15, 2023.
  32. ^ U.S. Congress. Senate Exec. Journal. 13th Cong., 3rd sess., 591, accessed March 15, 2023.
  33. ^ Stat. 348, 3 Stat. 472
  34. ^ "Secession Ordinances of 13 Confederate States". University of Houston. Archived from the original on September 5, 2015. Retrieved May 24, 2015.
  35. ^ Constitution for the Provisional Government of the Confederate States of America Archived August 20, 2016, at the Wayback Machine, accessed July 8, 2015
  36. ^ 16 Stat. 67
  37. ^ a b c d e f Secretary of State of Mississippi, "Mississippi Blue Book. Biennial report of the Secretary of State to the Legislature of Mississippi. [1929-1931]" (1931). page 40, accessed March 20, 2023.
  38. ^ a b c d e f g h Glashan 1979, p. 164.
  39. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 801–802.
  40. ^ "George Poindexter". National Governors Association. Retrieved March 15, 2023.
  41. ^ "State Legislature". Natchez Gazette. January 8, 1820. p. 4. Retrieved March 20, 2023.
  42. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 802–803.
  43. ^ "Walter Leake". National Governors Association. Retrieved March 15, 2023.
  44. ^ a b Sobel 1978, p. 803.
  45. ^ a b "Gerard Chittocque Brandon". National Governors Association. Retrieved March 15, 2023.
  46. ^ "none". Natchez Gazette. January 14, 1826. p. 2. Retrieved March 20, 2023. This day at 12 o'clock, His Excellency the Governor elect, after taking the Oath prescribed by the Constitution, delivered to both Houses of the General Assembly, the following inaugural address.
  47. ^ "Official". State Journal. July 29, 1826. p. 3. Retrieved March 20, 2023.
  48. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 804.
  49. ^ "Abram Marshall Scott". National Governors Association. Retrieved March 15, 2023.
  50. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 804–805.
  51. ^ a b "Charles Lynch". National Governors Association. Retrieved March 15, 2023.
  52. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at Kallenbach 1977, pp. 325–327.
  53. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 805.
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  55. ^ "Mississippi Legislature". The Natchez Weekly Courier. December 6, 1833. p. 2. Retrieved March 20, 2023.
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