The governor of Virginia is the state's head of government and commander-in-chief of the state's official national guard. The first Constitution of 1776 created the office of governor, to be elected annually by the Virginia State Legislature. The governor could serve up to three years at a time, and once out of office, could not serve again for four years.[1] The 1830 constitution changed the thrice-renewable one-year term length to a non-renewable three-year term, and set the start date at the first day in January following an election.[2] This constitution also prevented governors from succeeding themselves, a prohibition that exists to the present day.[3] The 1851 Constitution increased terms to four years[4] and made the office elected by the people, rather than the legislature.[5] The commencement of the Governor's term was moved to the first day in February by the 1902 Constitution,[6] and then to the Saturday after the second Wednesday in January by the 1971 and current Constitution.[7]

If the office of governor is vacant due to death, impeachment and disqualification, or resignation, the lieutenant governor of Virginia becomes governor.[8] The office of lieutenant governor was created in 1851.[9] Prior to that a Council of State existed; it chose from among its members a president who would be "lieutenant-governor" and would act as governor when there was a vacancy in that office.[1][10] The governor and the lieutenant governor are elected at the same time but not on the same ticket. Officially, there have been 74 governors of Virginia; the acting governors are not counted.

Governors

For the period before independence, see List of colonial governors of Virginia.

Virginia was one of the original Thirteen Colonies and was admitted as a state on June 25, 1788.[11] Before it declared its independence, Virginia was a colony of the Kingdom of Great Britain. It seceded from the Union on April 17, 1861,[12] and was admitted to the Confederate States of America on May 7, 1861.[13] Following the end of the American Civil War, Virginia during Reconstruction constituted the First Military District, which exerted some control over governor appointments and elections. Virginia was readmitted to the Union on January 26, 1870.[14]

The federal government recognized the Restored Government of Virginia, based in Wheeling, as the legitimate government in Virginia on June 25, 1861. It elected its own slate of governors, and after West Virginia was split from Virginia on June 20, 1863, the restored government relocated to Alexandria.

Governors of the Commonwealth of Virginia
No. Governor Term in office Party Election Lt. Governor[a][b]
1   Patrick Henry
(1736–1799)
[15]
July 6, 1776[16]

June 1, 1779
(term-limited)[c]
None[18] 1776 Office did not exist
1777
1778
2 Thomas Jefferson
(1743–1826)
[19]
June 1, 1779[20]

June 4, 1781
(did not run)
None[18] 1779
1780
3 William Fleming
(1727–1795)
[21]
June 4, 1781[22]

June 12, 1781
(did not run)
None[18] Senior member of
Governor's Council
acting
[d]
4 Thomas Nelson Jr.
(1738–1789)
[25]
June 12, 1781[24]

November 22, 1781
(resigned)[e]
None[18] 1781
(special)
David Jameson
(1723–1793)
[26]
November 22, 1781[27]

December 1, 1781
(did not run)
None[18] Senior member of
Governor's Council
acting
5 Benjamin Harrison V
(1726–1791)
[28]
December 1, 1781[27]

November 30, 1784
(term-limited)[c]
None[18] 1781
1782
1783
6 Patrick Henry
(1736–1799)
[15]
November 30, 1784[29]

November 30, 1786
(did not run)
None[18] 1784
1785
7 Edmund Randolph
(1753–1813)
[30]
November 30, 1786[31]

November 12, 1788
(resigned)[f]
None[18] 1786
1787
8 Beverley Randolph
(1754–1797)
[34][35]
November 12, 1788[29]

December 1, 1791
(term-limited)[c]
None[18] Senior member of
Governor's Council
acting
1788
1789
1790
9 Henry Lee III
(1756–1818)
[36][37]
December 1, 1791[29]

December 1, 1794
(term-limited)[c]
Federalist[23] 1791
1792
1793
10 Robert Brooke
(d. 1800)
[38][39]
December 1, 1794[29]

November 30, 1796
(resigned)[g]
Democratic-
Republican
[23]
1794
1795
11 James Wood
(1741–1813)
[40][41]
November 30, 1796[29]

December 19, 1799
(term-limited)[h][c]
Democratic-
Republican
[40]
Senior member of
Governor's Council
acting
1796
1797
1798
12 James Monroe
(1758–1831)
[46][47]
December 19, 1799[48]

December 29, 1802
(term-limited)[c]
Democratic-
Republican
[23]
1799
1800
1801
13 John Page
(1743–1808)
[49][50]
December 29, 1802[29]

December 11, 1805
(term-limited)[c]
Democratic-
Republican
[23]
1802
1803
1804
14 William H. Cabell
(1772–1853)
[51][52]
December 11, 1805[29]

December 12, 1808
(term-limited)[c]
Democratic-
Republican
[23]
1805
1806
1807
15 John Tyler Sr.
(1747–1813)
[53][54]
December 12, 1808[29]

January 15, 1811
(resigned)[i]
Democratic-
Republican
[23]
1808
1809
1810
George William Smith
(1762–1811)
[55][56]
January 15, 1811[29]

January 19, 1811
(lost election)
Democratic-
Republican
[23]
Senior member of
Governor's Council
acting
16 James Monroe
(1758–1831)
[46][47]
January 19, 1811[29]

April 3, 1811
(resigned)[j]
Democratic-
Republican
[23]
1811
(special)
17 George William Smith
(1762–1811)
[55][56]
April 3, 1811[29]

December 26, 1811
(died in office)
Democratic-
Republican
[23]
Senior member of
Governor's Council
acting
1811
Peyton Randolph
(1779–1828)
[57][58]
December 26, 1811[29]

January 4, 1812
(successor took office)
Democratic-
Republican
[23]
Senior member of
Governor's Council
acting
18 James Barbour
(1775–1842)
[59][60]
January 4, 1812[29]

December 11, 1814
(did not run)
Democratic-
Republican
[23]
Jan. 1812
1812
1813
19 Wilson Cary Nicholas
(1761–1820)
[61][62]
December 11, 1814[29]

December 11, 1816
(did not run)
Democratic-
Republican
[23]
1814
1815
20 James Patton Preston
(1774–1843)
[63][64]
December 11, 1816[29]

December 11, 1819
(term-limited)[c]
Democratic-
Republican
[23]
1816
1817
1818
21 Thomas Mann Randolph Jr.
(1768–1828)
[65][66]
December 11, 1819[29]

December 11, 1822
(term-limited)[c]
Democratic-
Republican
[23]
1819
1820
1821
22 James Pleasants
(1769–1836)
[67][68]
December 11, 1822[29]

December 11, 1825
(term-limited)[c]
Democratic-
Republican
[23]
1822
1823
1824
23 John Tyler
(1790–1862)
[69][70]
December 11, 1825[29]

March 4, 1827
(resigned)[k]
Democratic-
Republican
[23]
1825
24 William Branch Giles
(1762–1830)
[71][72]
March 4, 1827[29]

March 4, 1830
(term-limited)[c]
Democratic-
Republican
[l]
1827
1828
1829
25 John Floyd
(1783–1837)
[74][75]
March 4, 1830[29]

March 31, 1834
(term-limited)[m]
Democratic[74] 1830
1831
26 Littleton Waller Tazewell
(1774–1860)
[77][78]
March 31, 1834[29]

March 30, 1836
(resigned)[n]
Democratic[77] 1834
Wyndham Robertson
(1803–1888)
[79][80]
March 30, 1836[29]

March 31, 1837
(successor took office)
Whig[o] Senior member of
Governor's Council
acting
27 David Campbell
(1779–1859)
[81][82]
March 31, 1837[29]

March 31, 1840
(term-limited)[m]
Democratic[p] 1837
28 Thomas Walker Gilmer
(1802–1844)
[83][84]
March 31, 1840[29]

March 20, 1841
(resigned)[q]
Whig[83] 1840
John M. Patton
(1797–1858)
[85][86]
March 20, 1841[29]

March 31, 1841
(successor took office)
Whig[85] Senior member of
Governor's Council
acting
[r]
John Rutherfoord
(1792–1866)
[87][88]
March 31, 1841[29]

March 31, 1842
(successor took office)
Democratic[87] Senior member of
Governor's Council
acting
[r]
John Munford Gregory
(1804–1884)
[89][90]
March 31, 1842[29]

January 5, 1843
(successor took office)
Whig[89] Senior member of
Governor's Council
acting
[r]
29 James McDowell
(1775–1851)
[91][92]
January 5, 1843[29]

January 1, 1846
(term-limited)[m]
Whig[91] 1842
30 William Smith
(1797–1887)
[93][94]
January 1, 1846[29]

January 1, 1849
(term-limited)[m]
Democratic[23] 1845
31 John B. Floyd
(1806–1863)
[95][96]
January 1, 1849[97]

January 1, 1852
(term-limited)[m]
Democratic[23] 1848
32 Joseph Johnson
(1785–1877)
[98][99]
January 1, 1852[100]

January 1, 1856
(term-limited)[s]
Democratic[23] 1851   Shelton Leake
33 Henry A. Wise
(1806–1876)
[102][103]
January 1, 1856[104]

January 1, 1860
(term-limited)[s]
Democratic[23] 1855 Elisha W. McComas
(resigned December 7, 1857)
William Lowther Jackson
34 John Letcher
(1813–1884)
[105][106]
January 1, 1860[29]

January 1, 1864
(term-limited)[s]
Democratic[23] 1859[t] Robert Latane Montague
William Smith
(1797–1887)
[93][94]
January 1, 1864[29]

May 9, 1865
(government
disestablished)
[u]
Democratic[23] 1863
(Confederate)[t]
Samuel Price
35 Francis Harrison Pierpont
(1814–1889)
[108]
June 20, 1861[109]

April 4, 1868
(removed)[v]
Unconditional Union[23] 1861
(Union)[t]
Daniel Polsley
Vacant
1863
(Union)[t]
Leopold Copeland Parker Cowper
Henry H. Wells
(1823–1900)
[110][111]
April 4, 1868[112]

September 21, 1869
(resigned)[w]
Military occupation Vacant
36 Gilbert Carlton Walker
(1833–1885)
[113][114]
September 21, 1869[115]

January 1, 1874
(term-limited)[x]
Installed by
military occupation
John F. Lewis
Republican[y] 1869 John Lawrence Marye Jr.[z]
37 James L. Kemper
(1823–1895)
[117][118]
January 1, 1874[119]

January 1, 1878
(term-limited)[aa]
Democratic[23] 1873 Robert E. Withers
(resigned March 1, 1875)
Henry Wirtz Thomas[ab]
38 Frederick W. M. Holliday
(1828–1899)
[121][122]
January 1, 1878[123]

January 1, 1882
(term-limited)[aa]
Democratic[23] 1877 James A. Walker
39 William E. Cameron
(1842–1927)
[124][125]
January 1, 1882[ac]

January 1, 1886
(term-limited)[aa]
Readjuster[23] 1881 John F. Lewis[ab]
40 Fitzhugh Lee
(1835–1905)
[127][128]
January 1, 1886[129]

January 1, 1890
(term-limited)[aa]
Democratic[23] 1885 John E. Massey
41 Philip W. McKinney
(1832–1899)
[130][131]
January 1, 1890[132]

January 1, 1894
(term-limited)[aa]
Democratic[23] 1889 James H. Tyler
42 Charles Triplett O'Ferrall
(1840–1905)
[133][134]
January 1, 1894[135]

January 1, 1898
(term-limited)[aa]
Democratic[23] 1893 Robert C. Kent
43 James Hoge Tyler
(1846–1925)
[136][137]
January 1, 1898[138]

January 1, 1902
(term-limited)[aa]
Democratic[23] 1897 Edward Echols
44 Andrew Jackson Montague
(1862–1937)
[139][140]
January 1, 1902[141]

February 1, 1906
(term-limited)[ad]
Democratic[23] 1901 Joseph Edward Willard
45 Claude A. Swanson
(1862–1939)
[143][144]
February 1, 1906[145]

February 1, 1910
(term-limited)[ad]
Democratic[23] 1905 James Taylor Ellyson
46 William Hodges Mann
(1843–1927)
[146][147]
February 1, 1910[148]

February 1, 1914
(term-limited)[ad]
Democratic[23] 1909
47 Henry Carter Stuart
(1855–1933)
[149][150]
February 1, 1914[ae]

February 1, 1918
(term-limited)[ad]
Democratic[23] 1913
48 Westmoreland Davis
(1859–1942)
[152][153]
February 1, 1918[154]

February 1, 1922
(term-limited)[ad]
Democratic[23] 1917 Benjamin Franklin Buchanan
49 Elbert Lee Trinkle
(1876–1939)
[155][156]
February 1, 1922[157]

February 1, 1926
(term-limited)[ad]
Democratic[23] 1921 Junius Edgar West
50 Harry F. Byrd
(1887–1966)
[158][159]
February 1, 1926[160]

January 15, 1930
(term-limited)[ad]
Democratic[23] 1925
51 John Garland Pollard
(1871–1937)
[161][162]
January 15, 1930[163]

January 16, 1934
(term-limited)[ad]
Democratic[23] 1929 James Hubert Price
52 George C. Peery
(1873–1952)
[164][165]
January 17, 1934[166]

January 18, 1938
(term-limited)[ad]
Democratic[23] 1933
53 James Hubert Price
(1878–1943)
[167][168]
January 19, 1938[169]

January 20, 1942
(term-limited)[ad]
Democratic[23] 1937 Saxon W. Holt
(died March 31, 1940)
Vacant
54 Colgate Darden
(1897–1981)
[170][171]
January 21, 1942[172]

January 15, 1946
(term-limited)[ad]
Democratic[23] 1941 William M. Tuck
55 William M. Tuck
(1896–1983)
[173][174]
January 16, 1946[175]

January 17, 1950
(term-limited)[ad]
Democratic[23] 1945 Lewis Preston Collins II
(died September 20, 1952)
56 John S. Battle
(1890–1972)
[176][177]
January 18, 1950[178]

January 19, 1954
(term-limited)[ad]
Democratic[23] 1949
Vacant
Allie Edward Stakes Stephens
(elected December 2, 1952)
57 Thomas B. Stanley
(1890–1970)
[179][180]
January 20, 1954[181]

January 11, 1958
(term-limited)[ad]
Democratic[23] 1953
58 J. Lindsay Almond
(1898–1986)
[182][183]
January 11, 1958[184]

January 13, 1962
(term-limited)[ad]
Democratic[23] 1957
59 Albertis Harrison
(1907–1995)
[185][186]
January 13, 1962[187]

January 15, 1966
(term-limited)[ad]
Democratic[23] 1961 Mills Godwin
60 Mills Godwin
(1914–1999)
[188][189]
January 15, 1966[190]

January 17, 1970
(term-limited)[ad]
Democratic[23] 1965 Fred G. Pollard
61 Linwood Holton
(1923–2021)
[191][192]
January 17, 1970[193]

January 12, 1974
(term-limited)[af]
Republican[23] 1969 J. Sargeant Reynolds[ag]
(died June 13, 1971)
Vacant
Henry Howell[ag]
(elected December 4, 1971)
62 Mills Godwin
(1914–1999)
[188][189]
January 12, 1974[195]

January 14, 1978
(term-limited)[af]
Republican[23] 1973 John N. Dalton
63 John N. Dalton
(1931–1986)
[196][197]
January 14, 1978[198]

January 16, 1982
(term-limited)[af]
Republican[197] 1977 Chuck Robb[ag]
64 Chuck Robb
(b. 1939)
[199]
January 16, 1982[200]

January 11, 1986
(term-limited)[af]
Democratic[199] 1981 Gerald L. Baliles
65 Gerald Baliles
(1940–2019)
[201]
January 11, 1986[202]

January 13, 1990
(term-limited)[af]
Democratic[201] 1985 Douglas Wilder
66 Douglas Wilder
(b. 1931)
[203]
January 13, 1990[204]

January 15, 1994
(term-limited)[af]
Democratic[203] 1989 Don Beyer[ag]
67 George Allen
(b. 1952)
[205]
January 15, 1994[206]

January 17, 1998
(term-limited)[af]
Republican[205] 1993
68 Jim Gilmore
(b. 1949)
[207]
January 17, 1998[208]

January 12, 2002
(term-limited)[af]
Republican[207] 1997 John H. Hager
69 Mark Warner
(b. 1954)
[209]
January 12, 2002[210]

January 14, 2006
(term-limited)[af]
Democratic[209] 2001 Tim Kaine
70 Tim Kaine
(b. 1958)
[211]
January 14, 2006[212]

January 16, 2010
(term-limited)[af]
Democratic[211] 2005 Bill Bolling[ab]
71 Bob McDonnell
(b. 1954)
[213]
January 16, 2010[214]

January 11, 2014
(term-limited)[af]
Republican[213] 2009
72 Terry McAuliffe
(b. 1957)
[215]
January 11, 2014[216]

January 13, 2018
(term-limited)[af]
Democratic[215] 2013 Ralph Northam
73 Ralph Northam
(b. 1959)
[217]
January 13, 2018[218]

January 15, 2022
(term-limited)[af]
Democratic[217] 2017 Justin Fairfax
74 Glenn Youngkin
(b. 1966)
[219]
January 15, 2022[220]

Incumbent[ah]
Republican[219] 2021 Winsome Sears

See also

Notes

  1. ^ The office of lieutenant governor was created in 1851 and first filled in 1852.
  2. ^ Lieutenant governors represented the same party as their governor unless noted.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Under the 1776 constitution, governors were ineligible to serve longer than three years successively.[17]
  4. ^ Jefferson refused re-election and left office at the end of his term. As the legislature had not yet elected a successor, due in part to chaos stemming from the Raid on Richmond, Fleming acted as governor until the next election.[21][23][24]
  5. ^ Nelson resigned due to ill health.[23]
  6. ^ Randolph resigned to serve in the Virginia House of Delegates and promote the United States Constitution there.[32][33][29]
  7. ^ Brooke resigned, having been elected Attorney General of Virginia.[29]
  8. ^ Many sources say that Hardin Burnley acted as governor, either from February 7, 1799,[42] or December 7,[43] serving until he resigned due to poor health on December 11,[44] at which time John Pendleton Jr. took over as acting governor[45] until Monroe became governor on December 19. However, details of their terms are sparse and it's unknown how official their capacity was, and Sobel's entry on Wood mentions no acting governors and says that he left office on December 19.[40]
  9. ^ Tyler resigned, having been confirmed to the United States District Court for the District of Virginia.[53]
  10. ^ Monroe resigned, having been appointed United States Secretary of State.[47]
  11. ^ Tyler resigned, having been elected to the United States Senate.[69]
  12. ^ Giles is labeled a Democrat by Dubin[73] and Sobel,[71] and a Democratic-Republican by Glashan[18] and Kallenbach.[23]
  13. ^ a b c d e Under the 1830 constitution, governors were ineligible to serve again until three years after their term.[76]
  14. ^ Tazewell resigned over disagreements with the General Assembly.[77]
  15. ^ Robertson is labeled a State's Rights Democrat by Kallenbach,[23] a Democrat by Glashan,[18] and a Whig by Sobel.[79]
  16. ^ Campbell is labeled a Whig by Glashan[18] and Kallenbach,[23] and a Democrat by Dubin[73] and Sobel.[81]
  17. ^ Gilmer resigned, having been elected to the United States House of Representatives for a term beginning March 4, 1841; he delayed his resignation two weeks, finally resigning due to a disagreement with the General Assembly on extradition.[83]
  18. ^ a b c After Gilmer's resignation, Patton acted as governor until the election, but the General Assembly failed to elect a successor, so the senior members of the Governor's Council each acted as governor for a year.[23]
  19. ^ a b c Under the 1851 constitution, governors were ineligible to succeed themselves.[101]
  20. ^ a b c d Virginia proclaimed its secession from the Union on April 17, 1861. In response, delegates from the northwestern counties assembled at Wheeling and formed the Restored Government of Virginia, which the federal government recognized as the legitimate government of Virginia on June 25, 1861. It operated a government, including state and federal elections, over the northwestern part of the state, the counties immediately around Washington, D.C., and the eastern shore. On June 20, 1863, the northwestern counties were split into their own state, West Virginia, and the Restored Government relocated to Alexandria, and after the fall of Richmond, the government relocated to Richmond to be the sole state government.
  21. ^ President Andrew Johnson issued an executive order on May 9, 1865, proclaiming that the state government run by Letcher and Smith had been illegitimate as of April 17, 1861, and that Pierpont was the legitimate governor.[107] Smith continued to attempt to claim the office until May 20.[29]
  22. ^ The Reconstruction Acts placed Virginia under full military control, and General John Schofield appointed Wells provisional governor.[110]
  23. ^ Wells was ordered to resign by General Edward Canby, who appointed Walker (who had already won election) in his place.
  24. ^ Under the 1864 constitution, governors were ineligible to succeed themselves.[116]
  25. ^ Walker ran in 1869 as a "Conservative Republican"[23] to differentiate from his opponent who was running as a Radical Republican.[113]
  26. ^ Represented the Conservative Party
  27. ^ a b c d e f g Under the 1870 constitution, governors were ineligible to succeed themselves.[120]
  28. ^ a b c Represented the Republican Party
  29. ^ The constitutional start date of the gubernatorial term was January 1, with no requirement for an oath; Cameron was not sworn in until January 2, presumably because January 1 was a Sunday.[126]
  30. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q Under the 1902 constitution, governors were ineligible to succeed themselves.[142]
  31. ^ The constitutional start date of the gubernatorial term was February 1, with no requirement for an oath; Stuart was not sworn in until February 2, presumably because February 1 was a Sunday.[151]
  32. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Under the 1971 constitution, governors are ineligible to succeed themselves.[194]
  33. ^ a b c d Represented the Democratic Party
  34. ^ Youngkin's term will expire on January 17, 2026; he will be term-limited.

References

General
  • "Former Virginia Governors". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 16, 2023.
  • Sobel, Robert (1978). Biographical directory of the governors of the United States, 1789-1978, Vol. IV. Meckler Books. ISBN 9780930466008. Retrieved June 13, 2023.
  • Dubin, Michael J. (2003). United States Gubernatorial Elections, 1776-1860: The Official Results by State and County. McFarland. ISBN 978-0-7864-1439-0.
  • Dubin, Michael J. (2014). United States Gubernatorial Elections, 1861-1911: The Official Results by State and County. McFarland. ISBN 978-0-7864-5646-8.
  • Kallenbach, Joseph Ernest (1977). American State Governors, 1776-1976. Oceana Publications. ISBN 978-0-379-00665-0. Retrieved September 23, 2023.
  • Glashan, Roy R. (1979). American Governors and Gubernatorial Elections, 1775-1978. Meckler Books. ISBN 978-0-930466-17-6.
  • "Our Campaigns - Governor of Virginia - History". www.ourcampaigns.com. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
  • "Our Campaigns - Governor of Virginia (CSA) - History". www.ourcampaigns.com. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
Specific
  1. ^ a b 1776 Const.
  2. ^ 1830 Const. Art IV section 1.
  3. ^ VA Const. Art V sec 1
  4. ^ 1851 Const. art V section 1.
  5. ^ 1851 Const. Art V section 2.
  6. ^ 1902 Const. Art V section 69.
  7. ^ VA Const. art V section 1.
  8. ^ VA Const. Art V section 16.
  9. ^ 1851 Const. art V section 8.
  10. ^ 1830 Const. art IV section 5.
  11. ^ "Ratification of the Constitution by the State of Virginia; June 26, 1788". The Avalon Project at Yale Law School. Archived from the original on August 22, 2015. Retrieved October 31, 2015.
  12. ^ "Secession Ordinances of 13 Confederate States". University of Houston. Archived from the original on September 5, 2015. Retrieved May 24, 2015.
  13. ^ An Act to admit the Commonwealth of Virginia as a member of the Confederate States of America Archived August 20, 2016, at the Wayback Machine, accessed July 8, 2015
  14. ^ 16 Stat. 62
  15. ^ a b "Patrick Henry". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  16. ^ "Fifth Virginia Revolutionary Convention Elected Patrick Henry Governor, June 29, 1776". edu.lva.virginia.gov. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  17. ^ "1776 Va. Const". Retrieved December 20, 2023.
  18. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Glashan 1979, p. 322.
  19. ^ "Thomas Jefferson". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  20. ^ "Thomas Jefferson's Election to Governor; an excerpt from the Journal of the House of Delegates (June 1, 1779)". Encyclopedia Virginia. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  21. ^ a b "William Fleming". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  22. ^ "Jack Jouett's Ride (1781)". Encyclopedia Virginia. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  23. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd Kallenbach 1977, pp. 613–616.
  24. ^ a b "Governor of Virginia". Monticello. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  25. ^ "Thomas Nelson". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  26. ^ "David Jameson". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  27. ^ a b History, The Hornbook of Virginia. "Governors of Virginia". Encyclopedia Virginia. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  28. ^ "Benjamin Harrison". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  29. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah Virginia (1918). A Register of the General Assembly of Virginia 1776-1918 and of the Constitutional Conventions. pp. viii–ix.
  30. ^ "Edmund Randolph". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  31. ^ "Richmond, (Virginia) Nov. 9". Hartford Courant. December 4, 1786. p. 4. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  32. ^ "New York, November 28". Hartford Courant. December 8, 1788. p. 3. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  33. ^ "Edmund Randolph". George Washington's Mount Vernon. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  34. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 1623.
  35. ^ "Beverley Randolph". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  36. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1623–1624.
  37. ^ "Henry Lee". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  38. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1624–1625.
  39. ^ "Robert Brooke". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  40. ^ a b c Sobel 1978, pp. 1625–1626.
  41. ^ "James Wood". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  42. ^ Dicken, Emma (1946). Our Burnley ancestors and allied families / compiled by Emma Dicken. New York : Hobson Book Press, 1946.
  43. ^ “From James Madison to James Monroe, 21 March 1785,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Madison/01-08-02-0137. [Original source: The Papers of James Madison, vol. 8, 10 March 1784 – 28 March 1786, ed. Robert A. Rutland and William M. E. Rachal. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1973, pp. 255–257.] Accessed July 17, 2023
  44. ^ "Hardin Burnley". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  45. ^ "John Pendleton". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  46. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 1626–1627.
  47. ^ a b c "James Monroe". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  48. ^ "none". Weekly Raleigh Register. December 31, 1799. p. 3. Retrieved July 18, 2023. On the 19th inst. his Excellenecy James Monroe, Esq., qualified as Governor of the state of Virginia...
  49. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1627–1628.
  50. ^ "John Page". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  51. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 1628.
  52. ^ "William Henry Cabell". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  53. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 1628–1629.
  54. ^ "John Tyler Sr". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  55. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 1629–1630.
  56. ^ a b "George William Smith". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  57. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 1630.
  58. ^ "Peyton Randolph". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  59. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1630–1631.
  60. ^ "James Barbour". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  61. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1631–1632.
  62. ^ "Wilson Cary Nicholas". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  63. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 1632.
  64. ^ "James Patton Preston". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  65. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1632–1633.
  66. ^ "Thomas Mann Randolph". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  67. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1633–1634.
  68. ^ "James Pleasants". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  69. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 1634–1635.
  70. ^ "John Tyler Jr". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  71. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 1635–1636.
  72. ^ "William Branch Giles". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  73. ^ a b Dubin 2003, p. 283.
  74. ^ a b Sobel 1978, p. 1636.
  75. ^ "John Floyd Sr". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  76. ^ "1830 Va. Const. art. IV, § 1". Retrieved December 20, 2023.
  77. ^ a b c Sobel 1978, pp. 1636–1637.
  78. ^ "Littleton Waller Tazewell". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  79. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 1637–1638.
  80. ^ "Wyndham Robertson". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  81. ^ a b Sobel 1978, p. 1638.
  82. ^ "David Campbell". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  83. ^ a b c Sobel 1978, pp. 1638–1639.
  84. ^ "Thomas Walker Gilmer". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  85. ^ a b Sobel 1978, p. 1639.
  86. ^ "John Mercer Patton". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  87. ^ a b Sobel 1978, p. 1640.
  88. ^ "John Rutherfoord". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  89. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 1640–1641.
  90. ^ "John Munford Gregory". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  91. ^ a b Sobel 1978, p. 1641.
  92. ^ "James McDowell". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  93. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 1641–1642.
  94. ^ a b "William Smith". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  95. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 1643.
  96. ^ "John Buchanan Floyd Jr". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  97. ^ "Virginia Legislature". Alexandria Gazette. January 2, 1849. p. 2. Retrieved July 19, 2023.
  98. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1643–1644.
  99. ^ "Joseph Johnson". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  100. ^ "none". Richmond Enquirer. January 2, 1852. p. 2. Retrieved July 19, 2023. Governor Floyd's term expired on Wednesday, and yesterday, at 12 M., Governor Joseph Johnson appeared at the Council Chamber... when the oaths of office, required to be taken by a Governor of the Commonwealth, were administered to Governor Johnson.
  101. ^ "1851 Va. Const. art. V, § 1". Retrieved December 20, 2023.
  102. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1644–1645.
  103. ^ "Henry Alexander Wise". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  104. ^ "Inauguration of Governor". Lynchburg Daily Virginian. January 2, 1856. p. 3. Retrieved July 19, 2023.
  105. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1645–1646.
  106. ^ "John Letcher". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  107. ^ Andrew Johnson, Executive Order—To Reestablish the Authority of the United States and Execute the Laws Within the Geographical Limits Known as the State of Virginia Online by Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, The American Presidency Project, accessed July 18, 2023
  108. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1646–1647.
  109. ^ "Western Virginia". Portland Press Herald. June 21, 1861. p. 2. Retrieved July 19, 2023.
  110. ^ a b Sobel 1978, p. 1647.
  111. ^ "Henry Horatio Wells". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  112. ^ "Gov. Wells Appointed Governor of Virginia". Evening Star. April 4, 1868. p. 1. Retrieved July 19, 2023.
  113. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 1647–1648.
  114. ^ "Gilbert Carlton Walker". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  115. ^ "Local Matters". Richmond Dispatch. September 22, 1869. p. 1. Retrieved July 19, 2023.
  116. ^ "1864 Va. Const. art. V, § 1". Retrieved December 20, 2023.
  117. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1648–1649.
  118. ^ "James Lawson Kemper". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  119. ^ "none". Alexandria Gazette. January 1, 1874. p. 2. Retrieved July 19, 2023. Gen. James L. Kemper was today inaugurated Governor of Virginia.
  120. ^ "1870 Va. Const. art. IV, § 1". Retrieved December 20, 2023.
  121. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 1649.
  122. ^ "Frederick William Mackey Holliday". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  123. ^ "Inauguration of Governor Holliday". Alexandria Gazette. January 1, 1878. p. 3. Retrieved July 19, 2023.
  124. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1650–1651.
  125. ^ "William E. Cameron". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  126. ^ "New State Government". Staunton Spectator. January 3, 1882. p. 2. Retrieved July 19, 2023.
  127. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 1651.
  128. ^ "Fitzhugh Lee". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  129. ^ "Fitz Lee Governor". Richmond Dispatch. January 2, 1886. p. 4. Retrieved July 19, 2023.
  130. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 1652.
  131. ^ "Philip Watkins McKinney". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  132. ^ "New Men in Office". Richmond Dispatch. January 2, 1890. p. 1. Retrieved July 19, 2023.
  133. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1652–1653.
  134. ^ "Charles Triplett O'Ferrall". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  135. ^ "It's Now Gov. O'Ferrall". The Norfolk Virginian. January 2, 1894. p. 1. Retrieved July 19, 2023.
  136. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1653–1654.
  137. ^ "James Hoge Tyler". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  138. ^ "Gov. Tyler Inaugurated". The Portsmouth Star. January 1, 1898. p. 1. Retrieved July 19, 2023.
  139. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1654–1655.
  140. ^ "Andrew Jackson Montague". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  141. ^ "New Governor Is Now at the Helm". Richmond Times-Dispatch. January 2, 1902. p. 1. Retrieved July 19, 2023.
  142. ^ "1902 Va. Const. art. V, § 69". Retrieved December 20, 2023.
  143. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 1655.
  144. ^ "Claude Augustus Swanson". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  145. ^ "Governor C. A. Swanson Takes Office Before a Brilliant Throng". Richmond Times-Dispatch. February 2, 1906. p. 1. Retrieved July 19, 2023.
  146. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 1656.
  147. ^ "William Hodges Mann". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  148. ^ "Governor Mann Warmly Greeted". Richmond Times-Dispatch. February 2, 1910. p. 1. Retrieved July 19, 2023.
  149. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1656–1657.
  150. ^ "Henry Carter Stuart". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  151. ^ "Thousands Cheer As New Executive Assumes Office". Richmond Times-Dispatch. February 3, 1914. p. 1. Retrieved July 19, 2023.
  152. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1657–1658.
  153. ^ "Westmoreland Davis". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  154. ^ "Governor Davis Is Inaugurated in Hall of House". Richmond Times-Dispatch. February 2, 1918. p. 1. Retrieved July 19, 2023.
  155. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1658–1659.
  156. ^ "Elbert Lee Trinkle". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  157. ^ "While Guns Boom in Salute, Takes Pledge of Office". Richmond Times-Dispatch. February 2, 1922. p. 1. Retrieved July 19, 2023.
  158. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1659–1660.
  159. ^ "Harry Flood Byrd". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  160. ^ "Harry F. Byrd Takes Reins of Government". Richmond Times-Dispatch. February 2, 1926. p. 1. Retrieved July 19, 2023.
  161. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1660–1661.
  162. ^ "John Garland Pollard". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  163. ^ "Pollard Stresses Need of Public Support of Laws in His Inaugural Address; Many Witness Ceremony". Richmond Times-Dispatch. January 16, 1930. p. 1. Retrieved July 19, 2023.
  164. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1661–1662.
  165. ^ "George Campbell Peery". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  166. ^ Southall, William B. (January 18, 1934). "Peery Inaugurated 50th Governor As Crowds Cheer; Recommends $3,000,000 More for Schools, Roads". Richmond Times-Dispatch. p. 1. Retrieved July 19, 2023.
  167. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1662–1663.
  168. ^ "James Hubert Price". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  169. ^ Latimer, James (January 20, 1938). "Price Dons Robe of State as Governor". Richmond Times-Dispatch. p. 1. Retrieved July 19, 2023.
  170. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1663–1664.
  171. ^ "Colgate Whitehead Darden". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  172. ^ Latimer, James (January 22, 1942). "Small Loan Rate Slash Is Advocated". Richmond Times-Dispatch. p. 1. Retrieved July 19, 2023.
  173. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 1664.
  174. ^ "William Munford Tuck". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  175. ^ "Governor Would End Federal Aid". Richmond Times-Dispatch. January 17, 1946. p. 1. Retrieved July 19, 2023.
  176. ^ Sobel 1978, p. 1665.
  177. ^ "John Stewart Battle". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  178. ^ Latimer, James (January 19, 1950). "New Governor Urges Fast Vote of Grants and Loans in 'Crisis'". Richmond Times-Dispatch. p. 1. Retrieved July 19, 2023.
  179. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1665–1666.
  180. ^ "Thomas Bahnson Stanley". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  181. ^ Latimer, James (January 21, 1954). "Stanley Asks One-Cent Boost in Gas Tax". Richmond Times-Dispatch. p. 1. Retrieved July 19, 2023.
  182. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1666–1667.
  183. ^ "James Lindsay Almond". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  184. ^ Latimer, James (January 12, 1958). "Almond Asks 2 Moves to Combat Integration". Richmond Times-Dispatch. p. 1. Retrieved July 19, 2023.
  185. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1667–1668.
  186. ^ "Albertis S. Harrison". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  187. ^ Latimer, James (January 14, 1962). "Harrison Asks Educational Renaissance". Richmond Times-Dispatch. p. 1A. Retrieved July 19, 2023.
  188. ^ a b Sobel 1978, pp. 1668–1669.
  189. ^ a b "Mills Edwin Godwin". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  190. ^ Latimer, James (January 16, 1966). "New Governor Exhorts Virginia to Seek Progress in Education". Richmond Times-Dispatch. p. 1A. Retrieved July 19, 2023.
  191. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1669–1670.
  192. ^ "Linwood Holton". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  193. ^ Latimer, James (January 18, 1970). "Holton to Strive to Make State 'A Model of Race Relations'". Richmond Times-Dispatch. p. A1. Retrieved July 19, 2023.
  194. ^ "Va. Const. art. V, § 1". Retrieved December 20, 2023.
  195. ^ Latimer, James (January 13, 1974). "Set Example of Integrity for U.S., New Governor Urges Virginians". Richmond Times-Dispatch. p. 1. Retrieved July 19, 2023.
  196. ^ Sobel 1978, pp. 1670–1671.
  197. ^ a b "John Nichols Dalton". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  198. ^ Latimer, James (January 15, 1978). "Dalton Pledges 'New Dominion'". Richmond Times-Dispatch. p. A1. Retrieved July 19, 2023.
  199. ^ a b "Charles Spittal Robb". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  200. ^ Eisman, Dale (January 17, 1982). "Robb Sees National Role for Virginia". Richmond Times-Dispatch. p. 1. Retrieved July 19, 2023.
  201. ^ a b "Gerald L. Baliles". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  202. ^ Eisman, Dale (January 12, 1986). "Baliles, Wilder, Ms. Terry Sworn In, Say State 'Leading the Nation Again'". Richmond Times-Dispatch. p. 1. Retrieved July 19, 2023.
  203. ^ a b "L. Douglas Wilder". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  204. ^ Hardy, Michael; Schapiro, Jeff E. (January 14, 1990). "Salute Freedom Today, Expand It, Wilder Tells 30,000 at Inaugural". Richmond Times-Dispatch. p. 1. Retrieved July 19, 2023.
  205. ^ a b "George Allen". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  206. ^ Whitley, Tyler (January 16, 1994). "It's Allen, for a Change". Richmond Times-Dispatch. p. 1. Retrieved July 19, 2023.
  207. ^ a b "James S. Gilmore". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  208. ^ Intress, Ruth S.; Stallsmith, Pamela (January 18, 1998). "'Common Man' Now Governor". Richmond Times-Dispatch. p. 1. Retrieved July 19, 2023.
  209. ^ a b "Mark R. Warner". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  210. ^ Schapiro, Jeff E. (January 13, 2002). "Warner Inaugurated". Richmond Times-Dispatch. p. A1. Retrieved July 19, 2023.
  211. ^ a b "Tim Kaine". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  212. ^ Schapiro, Jeff E. (January 15, 2006). "Gov. Kaine Takes Office". Richmond Times-Dispatch. p. A1. Retrieved July 19, 2023.
  213. ^ a b "Robert McDonnell". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  214. ^ Whitley, Tyler (January 17, 2010). "State of Opportunity". Richmond Times-Dispatch. p. A1. Retrieved July 19, 2023.
  215. ^ a b "Terry McAuliffe". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  216. ^ Nolan, Jim; Meola, Olympia (January 12, 2014). "The Work Begins". Richmond Times-Dispatch. p. A1. Retrieved July 19, 2023.
  217. ^ a b "Ralph Northam". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  218. ^ Moomaw, Graham (January 14, 2018). "New Hand at the Helm". Richmond Times-Dispatch. p. A1. Retrieved July 19, 2023.
  219. ^ a b "Glenn Youngkin". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  220. ^ Leonor, Mel (January 16, 2022). "Youngkin Sworn In As Governor". Richmond Times-Dispatch. p. A1. Retrieved July 19, 2023.