This is a list of prominent rabbis. Rabis are Judaism's spiritual and religious leaders.

See also: List of Jews.

Mishnaic period (ca. 70–200 CE)

Main article: Tannaim

AcharonimRishonimGeonimSavoraimAmoraimTannaimZugot
Rabbi Akiva

Talmudic period (ca. 200–500 CE)

Main article: Amoraim

Further information: Talmud

Middle Ages (ca. 500–1500 CE)

Further information: Geonim and Rishonim

Rashi
Maimonides
Nachmanides

16th century

Further information: Acharonim

16th–17th centuries

Joseph ben Ephraim Karo
Moses Isserles
Judah Loew ben Bezalel

18th century

Vilna Gaon
Shneur Zalman of Liadi

Orthodox rabbis

Further information: Orthodox Judaism

19th century

Netziv
Ben Ish Chai
Tzemach Tzedek

20th century

Religious-Zionist

Abraham Isaac Kook
Yehuda Amital
Shlomo Goren

Haredi

Alter of Slabodka
Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson
Rabbi Moshe Feinstein
Rabbi Isser Zalman Meltzer

Modern Orthodox

Bernard Revel
Aharon Lichtenstein
Norman Lamm

Contemporary (ca. 21st century)

Religious-Zionist

Yisrael Meir Lau
Shlomo Amar
Avigdor Nebenzahl

Haredi

Rabbi Ovadia Yosef
Rabbi Yosef Shalom Elyashiv
Rabbi Chaim Kanievsky
Rabbi Dovid Twersky, Grand Rabbi of Skver
Rabbi Yechezkel Roth of Karlsburg
Rabbi Yechezkel Roth of Karlsburg
Rabbi Shlomo Miller

Modern Orthodox

Further information: Modern Orthodox

polaMichael Rosensweig (left)
polaMichael Rosensweig (left)
Mordechai Willig
Jonathan Sacks

Conservative

Further information: Conservative Judaism and Rabbinical Assembly

19th century

20th century

Contemporary (ca. 21st century)

Union for Traditional Judaism

Further information: Union for Traditional Judaism

Reform

Further information: Reform Judaism

19th century

20th century

Contemporary (ca. 21st century)

Rabbi Angela Warnick Buchdahl

Reconstructionists

Further information: Reconstructionist Judaism

20th century

Contemporary (ca. 21st century)

Karaite rabbis

Further information: Karaite Judaism and List of Karaite Jews

Other rabbis

Further information: Jewish Renewal and Humanistic Judaism

See also

References

  1. ^ Hezser, Catherine (1997). The Social Structure of the Rabbinic Movement in Roman Palestine. Mohr Siebeck. pp. 64–. ISBN 978-3-16-146797-4. We suggest that the avoidance of the title "Rabbi" for pre-70 sages may have originated with the editors of the Mishnah. The editors attributed the title to some sages and not to others. The avoidance of the title for pre-70 sages may perhaps be seen as a deliberate program on the part of these editors who wanted to create the impression that the “rabbinic movement" began with R. Yochanan b. Zakkai and that the Yavnean "academy" was something new, a notion that is sometimes already implicitly or explicitly suggested by some of the traditions available to them. This notion is not diminished by the occasional claim to continuity with the past which was limited to individual teachers and institutions and served to legitimize rabbinic authority.
  2. ^ "Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik as Philosopher". Spertus, Institute for Jewish Learning and Leadership. February 16, 2014. This conference situated Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik, the great American Talmudist and Modern Orthodox leader, within the tradition of Western philosophy that includes ancient, medieval, and modern figures, ranging from Aristotle to Maimonides to Kant.
  3. ^ New York Times obituary, July 23, 1986.
  4. ^ "Black Rabbi Reaches Out to Mainstream of His Faith", Nikko Kopel, New York Times, March 16, 2008
  5. ^ "Home".

Orthodox

Conservative

Reform

Reconstructionist

Pan-denominational