The list of shipwrecks in October 1939 includes ships sunk, foundered, grounded, or otherwise lost during October 1939.

1 October

List of shipwrecks: 1 October 1939
Ship Country Description
Gun  Sweden World War II: The cargo ship (1,198 GRT, 1891) was stopped in the evening of 30 September 30 miles (48 km) northwest of Hanstholm by U-3 ( Kriegsmarine). The papers of the ship showed that she was carrying contraband. A German scuttling party went aboard while the crew left, but then a British submarine came. The ship was finally sunk by a torpedo of U-3 in the morning of 1 October. The crew were rescued by Dagmar ( Denmark).[1][2]
M85  Kriegsmarine World War II: The Type 1916 minesweeper (507/544 t, 1918) struck a mine laid by ORP Żbik ( Polish Navy) in the Baltic Sea north of Jastarnia, Poland (54°45′N 18°45′E / 54.750°N 18.750°E / 54.750; 18.750) and sank with the loss of 24 of her 71 crew. The survivors were rescued by M-122 and a number of R boats (all  Kriegsmarine).[3][4]
Suzon  Belgium World War II: The cargo ship (2,239 GRT, 1913) was torpedoed and sunk in the Atlantic Ocean 42 nautical miles (78 km) north west of Ouessant, Finistère, France (48°08′N 7°36′W / 48.133°N 7.600°W / 48.133; -7.600) by U-35 ( Kriegsmarine). The whole crew were rescued by HMS Acheron ( Royal Navy).[4][5]

2 October

List of shipwrecks: 2 October 1939
Ship Country Description
Baltic  Finland World War II: The schooner (451 GRT, 1919) struck a mine and sank in the Kattegat.[6]
ORP Czajka  Polish Navy World War II: Invasion of Poland: The minesweeper (183/203 t, 1936) was scuttled at Hel, Poland. Refloated the next day, salvaged and repaired and entered Kriegsmarine service as Westernplatte.[4]
ORP Rybitwa  Polish Navy World War II: Invasion of Poland: The minesweeper (183/203 t, 1935) was scuttled at Hel. Later salvaged by the Germans and entered Kriegsmarine service as Rixhoft.[4]
ORP Zuraw  Polish Navy World War II: Invasion of Poland: The minesweeper (183/203 t, 1939) was scuttled at Hel. She was refloated the next day, repaired and entered Kriegsmarine service as Oxhoft.[4]

3 October

List of shipwrecks: 3 October 1939
Ship Country Description
Diamantis  Greece World War II: The cargo ship (4,990 GRT, 1917) was torpedoed and sunk in the Atlantic Ocean 40 nautical miles (74 km) west of the Skellig Islands, County Kerry, Ireland (49°22′N 6°46′W / 49.367°N 6.767°W / 49.367; -6.767) by U-35 ( Kriegsmarine). All 28 crew were rescued by U-35, and later landed at Ventry, County Kerry.[4][7][8][9]
Høegh Transporter  Norway World War II: The cargo ship (4,914 GRT, 1935) struck a mine off Saint John's Island, Singapore and sank with the loss of one crew member. The ship was later salvaged.[3][4]

4 October

List of shipwrecks: 4 October 1939
Ship Country Description
Glen Farg  United Kingdom World War II: The coaster (876 GRT, 1937) was torpedoed and sunk in the Atlantic Ocean 60 nautical miles (110 km) south south west of Sumburgh Head, Shetland Islands (58°52′N 1°31′W / 58.867°N 1.517°W / 58.867; -1.517) by U-23 ( Kriegsmarine) with the loss of one of her 17 crew. Survivors were rescued by HMS Firedrake ( Royal Navy).[3][4][10][11]
Mopsa  United Kingdom World War II: The fishing vessel (206 GRT) ran ashore on Aberdeen beach, abreast the Beach Ballroom due to the blackout. The crew of nine were rescued. It was found impossible to free the vessel from the sands, and she was broken up where she lay.[12]

5 October

List of shipwrecks: 5 October 1939
Ship Country Description
Marwarri  United Kingdom World War II: The cargo ship (8,063 GRT, 1935) struck a mine laid in the Bristol Channel (51°24′N 3°57′W / 51.400°N 3.950°W / 51.400; -3.950) by U-32 ( Kriegsmarine). Two crew were killed. She was beached in Mumbles Bay and was in 1941 repaired and returned to service.[13]
Newton Beech  United Kingdom World War II: The cargo ship (4,651 GRT, 1925) was captured in the Atlantic Ocean south of Freetown, Sierra Leone (9°35′S 6°30′W / 9.583°S 6.500°W / -9.583; -6.500) by Admiral Graf Spee ( Kriegsmarine). Her 34 crew were captured. She was scuttled three days later off the coast of Angola.[3][4][14]
Stonegate  United Kingdom World War II: The cargo ship (5,044 GRT, 1928) was shelled and sunk in the Atlantic Ocean 400 nautical miles (740 km) east south east of Bermuda (31°10′N 54°00′W / 31.167°N 54.000°W / 31.167; -54.000) by Deutschland ( Kriegsmarine). Her 39 crew were captured.[3][4][15]

6 October

List of shipwrecks: 6 October 1939
Ship Country Description
Lochgoil  United Kingdom World War II: The cargo ship (9,462 GRT, 1922) struck a mine laid by U-32 ( Kriegsmarine) and was damaged in the Bristol Channel (5 nautical miles (9.3 km)) off the Scarweather Lightship ( United Kingdom) (51°24′N 4°00′W / 51.400°N 4.000°W / 51.400; -4.000). There was no casualty. She was beached in Mumbles Bay. Lochgoil was on a voyage from Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada to Newport, Monmouthshire. She was refloated on 28 November, repaired and returned to service.[4][16][17]
Mahratta  United Kingdom World War II: Convoy HG 1: The cargo ship (6,690 GRT, 1917) ran aground on Fork Spit, Goodwin Sands, Kent and was wrecked. All crew were rescued by the hoveller Lady Haig ( United Kingdom).

7 October

List of shipwrecks: 7 October 1939
Ship Country Description
Ashlea  United Kingdom World War II: The cargo ship (4,222 GRT, 1929) was captured and sunk in the South Atlantic (9°00′S 3°00′W / 9.000°S 3.000°W / -9.000; -3.000) by Admiral Graf Spee ( Kriegsmarine). All 35 crew were captured.[3][18]
Binnendijk  Netherlands World War II: The cargo ship (6,873 GRT, 1921) struck a mine laid by U-26 ( Kriegsmarine) and was damaged 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) south east of the Shambles Lightship ( United Kingdom). She sank 1 nautical mile (1.9 km) north of the lightship (50°32′N 2°20′W / 50.533°N 2.333°W / 50.533; -2.333) early the next day. All 42 crew survived. The wreck was dispersed on 10 October.[3][4][19][20]

8 October

List of shipwrecks: 8 October 1939
Ship Country Description
U-12  Kriegsmarine World War II: The Type IIB submarine (275/323 t, 1935) struck a mine and sank in the English Channel off Dover, Kent, United Kingdom (approximately 51°10′N 1°30′E / 51.167°N 1.500°E / 51.167; 1.500) with the loss of all 27 crew.
Vistula  Sweden World War II: The cargo ship (1,018 GRT, 1919) was torpedoed and sunk in the Atlantic Ocean 35 nautical miles (65 km) north of Muckle Flugga, Shetland Islands, United Kingdom by U-37 ( Kriegsmarine) with the loss of nine of her 18 crew.[21][22]

9 October

List of shipwrecks: 9 October 1939
Ship Country Description
Indra  Finland World War II: The cargo ship (1,999 GRT) was badly damaged by a mine in the North Sea off Terschelling, Friesland, Netherlands. Three crew were killed and 6 of the 20 survivors were wounded. The ship was towed to IJmuiden, Netherlands.[23][24]
Mount Ida  Greece The cargo ship (4,202 GRT, 1938) ran aground on the Ower Bank in the North Sea. All 29 crew rescued by lifeboat but one later died from injuries sustained during the rescue.

10 October

List of shipwrecks: 10 October 1939
Ship Country Description
Huntsman  United Kingdom World War II: The cargo ship (8,196 GRT, 1921) was captured in the South Atlantic (8°30′S 5°15′W / 8.500°S 5.250°W / -8.500; -5.250) by Admiral Graf Spee ( Kriegsmarine). She was scuttled on 17 October at approximately 16°S 17°W / 16°S 17°W / -16; -17.[4][25]
Marly  Norway The cargo ship (1,115 GRT, 1918) foundered in a cyclone in the Indian Ocean (18°30′N 72°21′E / 18.500°N 72.350°E / 18.500; 72.350) with the loss of all 46 crew.[26]
Saltaire  United Kingdom The trawler (202 GRT, 1919) ran aground at Spurn Point, Yorkshire. Salvage attempts failed and she was declared a total loss.[27]

12 October

List of shipwrecks: 12 October 1939
Ship Country Description
Aris  Greece World War II: The cargo ship (4,810 GRT, 1914) was shelled and sunk in the Atlantic Ocean off the west coast of Ireland (53°28′N 14°30′W / 53.467°N 14.500°W / 53.467; -14.500) by U-37 ( Kriegsmarine) with the loss of two crew of her 29 crew. Survivors were rescued by Sicilien ( Netherlands).[3][4][28]
Crane  United States With no one aboard, the 10-gross register ton, 34-foot (10.4 m) fishing vessel was wrecked at Valdez, Territory of Alaska.[29]
Emile Miguet  France World War II: Convoy KJ 2S: The tanker (14,115 GRT, 1937) straggled behind the convoy. She was torpedoed and damaged in the Atlantic Ocean 190 nautical miles (350 km) south west of the Fastnet Rock (50°15′N 14°50′W / 50.250°N 14.833°W / 50.250; -14.833) by U-48 ( Kriegsmarine) with the loss of two crew. Survivors were rescued by Black Hawk ( United States). Emile Miguet was scuttled by HMS Imogen ( Royal Navy).[3][4][30]
Princeton  United States During a voyage from Haines to Sitka, Territory of Alaska, with three passengers, a crew of three, and a cargo of four tons of potatoes, the 45-gross register ton, 60.2-foot (18.3 m) motor vessel was wrecked without loss of life during a gale on Little Island (58°32′25″N 135°02′35″W / 58.54028°N 135.04306°W / 58.54028; -135.04306 (Little Island)) in Lynn Canal in Southeast Alaska. On 13 October, the Alaska Game Commission motor vessel Bear rescued all six people who had been aboard Princeton.[31]

13 October

List of shipwrecks: 13 October 1939
Ship Country Description
Gressholm  Norway World War II: The coaster (619 GRT, 1921) struck a mine and sank in the North Sea 90 nautical miles (170 km) north west of Texel, North Holland, Netherlands (53°55′N 2°55′E / 53.917°N 2.917°E / 53.917; 2.917) with the loss of three of her 11 crew. The survivors were rescued by Emmi ( Finland).[4][32]
Heronspool  United Kingdom World War II: Convoy OB 17S: The cargo ship (5,202 GRT, 1929) straggled behind the convoy. She was torpedoed and sunk in the Atlantic Ocean 260 nautical miles (480 km) south west of the Fastnet Rock (50°13′N 14°48′W / 50.217°N 14.800°W / 50.217; -14.800) by U-48 ( Kriegsmarine). All crew were rescued by President Harding ( United States).[3][4][33]
Louisiane  France World War II: Convoy OA 17: The cargo ship (6,903 GRT, 1921) straggled behind the convoy. She was shelled and sunk in the Atlantic Ocean 240 nautical miles (440 km) south west of the Fastnet Rock (50°14′N 15°05′W / 50.233°N 15.083°W / 50.233; -15.083) by U-48 ( Kriegsmarine) with the loss of one crew member. Survivors were rescued by HMS Imogen ( Royal Navy).[3][4][34][35]
U-40  Kriegsmarine World War II: The Type IXA submarine (1,016/1,134 t, 1939) struck a mine in the English Channel (50°42′N 0°15′E / 50.700°N 0.250°E / 50.700; 0.250) and sank with the loss of 45 of her 48 crew. Survivors were rescued by HMS Boreas and HMS Brazen (both  Royal Navy).[4]
U-42  Kriegsmarine World War II: The Type IXA submarine (1,016/1,134 t, 1939) was depth charged and sunk at 49°12′00″N 16°00′00″W / 49.20000°N 16.00000°W / 49.20000; -16.00000 by HMS Imogen and HMS Ilex (both  Royal Navy) with the loss of 26 of her 46 crew.

14 October

List of shipwrecks: 14 October 1939
Ship Country Description
Bretagne  France World War II: Convoy KJF 3: The cargo ship (10,108 GRT, 1922) was torpedoed and sunk in the Atlantic Ocean 130 nautical miles (240 km) south west of the Fastnet Rock (50°20′N 12°45′W / 50.333°N 12.750°W / 50.333; -12.750) by U-45 ( Kriegsmarine) with the loss of 5 crew and 2 passengers. The 341 survivors were rescued by HMS Ilex and HMS Imogen (both  Royal Navy).[3][4][36][37]
Lochavon  United Kingdom World War II: Convoy KJF 3: The cargo liner (9,205 GRT, 1938) was torpedoed and damaged in the Atlantic Ocean 230 nautical miles (430 km) south west of the Fastnet Rock by U-45 ( Kriegsmarine) with the loss of seven crew. Survivors were rescued by HMS Isis ( Royal Navy) and Lochavon sank on 16 October.[3][4]
Lorentz W Hansen  Norway World War II: The cargo ship (1,918 GRT, 1920) was shelled and sunk in the Atlantic Ocean 420 nautical miles (780 km) east of Newfoundland (49°05′N 43°44′W / 49.083°N 43.733°W / 49.083; -43.733) by Deutschland ( Kriegsmarine) with the loss of three of her 21 crew.[3][4][38][39]
Marion Traber  Germany The cargo ship (2,434 GRT, 1923) ran aground in the Baltic Sea off Nyköping, Sweden and was wrecked.[3]
HMS Royal Oak  Royal Navy World War II: The Revenge-class battleship (27,790/31,130 t, 1916) was torpedoed and sunk in Scapa Flow, Orkney Islands by U-47 ( Kriegsmarine) with the loss of 833 of her 1,219 crew.
Sneaton  United Kingdom World War II: The cargo ship (3,677 GRT, 1925) was torpedoed, shelled and sunk in the Atlantic Ocean 150 nautical miles (280 km) south west of the Fastnet Rock (49°05′N 13°05′W / 49.083°N 13.083°W / 49.083; -13.083) by U-48 ( Kriegsmarine) with the loss of one crew member. Survivors were rescued by Alexandre Andre ( Belgium).[3][4][40]
U-45  Kriegsmarine World War II: The Type VIIB submarine (741/843 t, 1938) was depth charged and sunk in the Atlantic Ocean south west of Ireland (50°58′N 12°57′W / 50.967°N 12.950°W / 50.967; -12.950) by HMS Icarus, HMS Inglefield, HMS Intrepid and HMS Ivanhoe (all  Royal Navy) with the loss of all 38 crew.

15 October

List of shipwrecks: 15 October 1939
Ship Country Description
Vermont  France World War II: The cargo ship (5,186 GRT, 1919) was torpedoed and sunk in the Atlantic Ocean 360 nautical miles (670 km) south west of the Fastnet Rock (48°01′N 17°22′W / 48.017°N 17.367°W / 48.017; -17.367) by U-37 ( Kriegsmarine) with the loss of two of her 45 crew. Survivors were rescued by HMS Inglefield ( Royal Navy).[41][42][43]
Wanja  Norway The cargo ship (2,618 GRT, 1919) ran aground off North Ronaldsay, Orkney Islands, United Kingdom and was wrecked. All 26 crew were saved.[44][45]

16 October

List of shipwrecks: 16 October 1939
Ship Country Description
Halle  Germany World War II: The blockade running cargo ship (5,889 GRT, 1921) was intercepted in the Atlantic Ocean south west of Dakar, Senegal by Duguay-Trouin ( French Navy) and was scuttled by her crew.[41]
Ionic Star  United Kingdom The cargo ship (5,594 GRT, 1917) ran aground in Liverpool Bay off Southport, Lancashire. No lives were lost and her cargo was later salvaged but the ship was a total loss.[46]

17 October

List of shipwrecks: 17 October 1939
Ship Country Description
City of Mandalay  United Kingdom World War II: Convoy HG 3: The cargo ship (7,028 GRT, 1925) was torpedoed and sunk in the Atlantic Ocean 360 nautical miles (670 km) west north west of Cape Finisterre, Spain (44°57′N 13°36′W / 44.950°N 13.600°W / 44.950; -13.600) by U-46 ( Kriegsmarine) with the loss of two of the 80 people on board. Survivors were rescued by Independence Hall ( United States) and Skudd IV ( Norway)[3][41][47]
Clan Chisholm  United Kingdom World War II: The cargo ship (7,256 GRT, 1937) was torpedoed and sunk in the Atlantic Ocean 150 nautical miles (280 km) north north west of Cape Finisterre (approximately 44°57′N 13°40′W / 44.950°N 13.667°W / 44.950; -13.667) by U-48 ( Kriegsmarine) with the loss of four of her 78 crew. Survivors were rescued by Independence Hall ( United States).[41][48]
Huntsman  United Kingdom World War II: The cargo ship (8,196 GRT, 1921) was sunk with demolition charges in the South Atlantic (16°00′S 17°00′W / 16.000°S 17.000°W / -16.000; -17.000) by Admiral Graf Spee ( Kriegsmarine) that had captured her on the 10th. The whole crew survived.[3][49]
HMS Iron Duke  Royal Navy World War II: The Iron Duke-class battleship (21,000/24,000 t, 1914) was attacked by four Junkers Ju 88 aircraft of 1 Staffeln, Kampfgeschwader 30, Luftwaffe at Scapa Flow and was beached to prevent her sinking.[50] Twenty-five crew were killed. She was later repaired and returned to service.
V 804 Skolpenbank  Kriegsmarine World War II: The vorpostenboot (381 GRT, 1930) struck a mine and sank in the North Sea off Schiermonnikoog, Friesland, Netherlands.[51][52]
Yorkshire  United Kingdom World War II: Convoy HG 3: The passenger ship (10,184 GRT, 1919) was torpedoed and sunk in the Atlantic Ocean 700 nautical miles (1,300 km) west of Bordeaux, Gironde, France (44°52′N 12°40′W / 44.867°N 12.667°W / 44.867; -12.667) by U-37 ( Kriegsmarine) with the loss of 58 of the 281 people on board. Survivors were rescued by Independence Hall ( United States).[3][41][53]

18 October

List of shipwrecks: 18 October 1939
Ship Country Description
Gonzenheim  Germany World War II: The cargo ship (4,574 GRT, 1929) was intercepted in the Denmark Strait (63°25′N 12°00′W / 63.417°N 12.000°W / 63.417; -12.000) by HMS Rawalpindi ( Royal Navy) and was scuttled by her crew.[41]

19 October

List of shipwrecks: 19 October 1939
Ship Country Description
City of London  United Kingdom The coaster collided in the River Thames with a Dutch vessel and was beached at World's End, Tilbury, Essex.[54]
Martha  United States The 30-gross register ton, 60.3-foot (18.4 m) fishing vessel was wrecked on either Walrus Island (56°01′40″N 160°50′00″W / 56.02778°N 160.83333°W / 56.02778; -160.83333 (Walrus Island)) or Deer Island (according to different reports) near Nelson Lagoon, Territory of Alaska, after a storm carried away her rudder. Her entire crew of four survived.[55]
ShCh-424  Soviet Navy The Shchuka-class submarine (590/708 t, 1936) collided in Kola Bay with trawler RT-43 ( Soviet Union) and sank. There were 34 dead and 10 survivors.[3][56][57]

20 October

List of shipwrecks: 20 October 1939
Ship Country Description
Azariah  United Kingdom The Thames barge sank in the North Sea off Burnham-on-Crouch, Essex.[58] (Look 29 September 1939)
Gustav Adolf  Sweden World War II: The cargo ship (926 GRT, 1920) was torpedoed, shelled and sunk in the North Sea 50 nautical miles (93 km) north of Sullom Voe, Shetland Islands (61°00′N 0°48′E / 61.000°N 0.800°E / 61.000; 0.800) by U-34 ( Kriegsmarine). Survivors were rescued by Biscaya ( Norway).[41][59][60]
Sea Venture  United Kingdom World War II: The cargo ship (2,327 GRT, 1930) was torpedoed, shelled and sunk in the North Sea east of the Shetland Islands (60°50′N 0°15′E / 60.833°N 0.250°E / 60.833; 0.250) by U-34 ( Kriegsmarine). All 25 crew were rescued by the Lerwick lifeboat.[41][61][62]
V-701 Este  Kriegsmarine (Look 21 October 1939)

21 October

List of shipwrecks: 21 October 1939
Ship Country Description
Capitaine Edmund Laborie  France World War II: The cargo ship (3,087 GRT, 1923) struck a mine and sank in the North Sea 1.5 nautical miles (2.8 km) east of the Inner Dowsing Lightship ( United Kingdom) (53°19′50″N 0°38′20″E / 53.33056°N 0.63889°E / 53.33056; 0.63889). All crew were rescued by the Gorleston Lifeboat Louise Stephens (
Royal National Lifeboat Institution).[41][63][64]
Deodata  Norway World War II: The tanker (3,295 GRT, 1897) struck a mine and sank in the North Sea off Great Yarmouth, Norfolk (53°21′00″N 0°36′09″E / 53.35000°N 0.60250°E / 53.35000; 0.60250). All crew were rescued by the Gorleston Lifeboat Louise Stephens (
Royal National Lifeboat Institution).[64][65]
Lake Neuchatel  Royal Navy World War II: The special service ship (3,859 GRT, 1907) was scuttled as a blockship in Kirk Sound, Scapa Flow, Orkney Islands. Salvaged in 1948.[66]
New Mathilde  United Kingdom The cargo ship (1,559 GRT, 1906) foundered in the South China Sea 3 nautical miles (5.6 km) off Kwangchowan, French Indo-China.[67][68]
Orsa  United Kingdom World War II: The cargo ship (1,478 GRT, 1925) struck a mine and sank in the North Sea 15 nautical miles (28 km) off Flamborough Head, Yorkshire with the loss of 11 of her 15 crew. Survivors were rescued by HMS Woolston ( Royal Navy.[3][41][69][70]
Poseidon  Germany World War II: The cargo ship (5,864 GRT, 1922) was captured in the Denmark Strait (67°08′N 21°18′W / 67.133°N 21.300°W / 67.133; -21.300 by HMS Scotstoun ( Royal Navy). She was taken in tow by HMS Transylvania ( Royal Navy) on 25 October but scuttled by her two days later after the towline parted in a blizzard.[41]
V 701 Este  Kriegsmarine World War II: The vorpostenboot (426 or 449 GRT, 1934) struck a mine and sank in the Baltic Sea off Møn, Denmark with the loss of 70 of her 75 crew.[50][41][71][72]

22 October

List of shipwrecks: 22 October 1939
Ship Country Description
Trevanion  United Kingdom World War II: The cargo ship (5,299 GRT, 1937) was shelled and sunk in the South Atlantic (19°40′S 4°02′W / 19.667°S 4.033°W / -19.667; -4.033) by Admiral Graf Spee ( Kriegsmarine).[3]
Whitemantle  United Kingdom World War II: The cargo ship (1,692 GRT, 1920) struck a mine and sank in the North Sea 5 to 6 nautical miles (9.3–11.1 km) off the Withernsea Lighthouse with the loss of 14 crew.[3][41]

23 October

List of shipwrecks: 23 October 1939
Ship Country Description
Albania  Sweden World War II: The cargo ship (1,241 GRT, 1903) struck a mine and sank in the North Sea 4 nautical miles (7.4 km) off the Humber Lightship ( United Kingdom) with the loss of two crew. Survivors were rescued by Channel Fisher ( United Kingdom).[3][41][73]
Emmy Friederich  Germany World War II: The tanker (4,372 or 4,327 GRT, 1904) was intercepted in the Yucatán Channel, Gulf of Mexico by HMS Caradoc ( Royal Navy) and HMCS Saguenay ( Royal Canadian Navy). She was scuttled by her crew.[74][75][76]

24 October

List of shipwrecks: 24 October 1939
Ship Country Description
Konstantinos Hadjiperatas  Greece World War II: The cargo ship (5,962 GRT, 1913) struck a mine and sank in the North Sea off the Inner Dowsing Lightship ( United Kingdom) (53°20′57″N 0°36′54″E / 53.34917°N 0.61500°E / 53.34917; 0.61500) with the loss of four of her 31 crew. Survivors were rescued by the Gorleston Lifeboat Louise Stephens (
Royal National Lifeboat Institution). The wreck was dispersed in 1947.[41][64][77][78]
Ledbury  United Kingdom World War II: The cargo ship (3,528 GRT, 1912) was shelled and sunk in the Atlantic Ocean 100 nautical miles (190 km) west of Gibraltar (36°01′N 7°22′W / 36.017°N 7.367°W / 36.017; -7.367) by U-37 ( Kriegsmarine), while she was rescuing survivors of Menin Ridge. All 31 crew were rescued by Crown City ( United States).[3][41][79][80]
Menin Ridge  United Kingdom World War II: The cargo ship (2,474 GRT, 1924) was torpedoed and sunk 100 nautical miles (190 km) west of Gibraltar (36°01′N 7°22′W / 36.017°N 7.367°W / 36.017; -7.367) by U-37 ( Kriegsmarine) with the loss of 20 crew. Five survivors were rescued by Crown City ( United States). The first of three ships sunk this day by U-37.[3][41]
Tafna  United Kingdom World War II: The cargo ship (4,413 GRT, 1930) was torpedoed sunk in the Atlantic Ocean 84 nautical miles (156 km) west of Gibraltar (35°44′N 7°23′W / 35.733°N 7.383°W / 35.733; -7.383) by U-37 ( Kriegsmarine) with the loss of two of her 33 crew. Survivors were rescued by HMS Douglas ( Royal Navy). The last of three ships sunk this day by U-37.[3][41][81]

25 October

List of shipwrecks: 25 October 1939
Ship Country Description
Amvrakia  Greece The passenger-cargo ship (286 GRT, 1896) ran aground on Euboea Island and was wrecked. Seven passengers died.[82][83][84]
U-16  Kriegsmarine World War II: The Type IIB submarine (275/323 t, 1936) was depth charged and sunk in the English Channel off Dover, Kent, United Kingdom by HMS Cayton Wyke and HMS Puffin (both  Royal Navy) with the loss of all 28 crew.[85]

27 October

List of shipwrecks: 27 October 1939
Ship Country Description
Bronté  United Kingdom World War II: Convoy OB 25: The cargo ship (5,317 GRT, 1919) was torpedoed and damaged in the Atlantic Ocean west of Ireland (49°30′N 12°15′W / 49.500°N 12.250°W / 49.500; -12.250) by U-34 ( Kriegsmarine) She was taken in tow by Englishman ( United Kingdom) but was scuttled on 30 October by HMS Esk ( Royal Navy) at 50°07′N 10°36′W / 50.117°N 10.600°W / 50.117; -10.600. There were no casualties.[3][41]
USC&GS Mikawe
United States Coast and Geodetic Survey
The hydrographic survey launch was destroyed by fire in a fueling incident at Norfolk, Virginia.

28 October

List of shipwrecks: 28 October 1939
Ship Country Description
Lynx II  United Kingdom World War II: The trawler (250 GRT, 1906) was shelled and sunk in the Atlantic Ocean north west of the Orkney Islands (59°50′N 4°20′W / 59.833°N 4.333°W / 59.833; -4.333) by U-59 ( Kriegsmarine). There were no casualties. The crew, along with all survivors from St. Nidan ( United Kingdom) were rescued by Lady Hogarth ( United Kingdom).[41][86][87][88]
St Nidan  United Kingdom World War II: The trawler (565 GRT, 1937) was torpedoed and sunk in the Atlantic Ocean north west of the Orkeny Islands (59°50′N 4°20′W / 59.833°N 4.333°W / 59.833; -4.333) by U-59 ( Kriegsmarine). The whole crew were rescued by Lynx II ( United Kingdom).[3][41][87][89]

29 October

List of shipwrecks: 29 October 1939
Ship Country Description
Malabar  United Kingdom World War II: Convoy HX 5A: The cargo ship (7,976 GRT, 1938) was torpedoed and sunk in the Atlantic Ocean 60 miles (97 km) west north west of Bishop Rock (49°57′N 7°37′W / 49.950°N 7.617°W / 49.950; -7.617) by U-34 ( Kriegsmarine) with the loss of five of her 75 crew. Survivors were rescued by HMS Grafton ( Royal Navy).[3][41][90]
Varangmalm  Norway World War II: The cargo ship (3,618 GRT, 1919) struck a mine and sank in the North Sea (53°50′N 0°17′E / 53.833°N 0.283°E / 53.833; 0.283) with the loss of one crew member. Survivors were rescued by the trawler Conida ( United Kingdom).[41][91]

30 October

List of shipwrecks: 30 October 1939
Ship Country Description
Cairnmona  United Kingdom World War II: Convoy HX 5B: The cargo ship (4,666 GRT, 1918) was torpedoed and damaged in the North Sea off Rattray Head, Aberdeenshire (57°38′N 1°45′W / 57.633°N 1.750°W / 57.633; -1.750) by U-13 ( Kriegsmarine) with the loss of three of her 44 crew. She was taken in tow by Englishman ( United Kingdom) but sank later that day. Survivors were rescued by HMT River Lossie ( Royal Navy).[3][41][92][93]
Juno  Finland World War II: The cargo ship (1,241 GRT, 1920) struck a mine and sank in the North Sea off Withernsea, Yorkshire (53°40′N 0°17′E / 53.667°N 0.283°E / 53.667; 0.283) with the loss of all six crew.[41][94]
HMS Northern Rover  Royal Navy World War II: The armed boarding vessel (655 GRT, 1936) was torpedoed and sunk in the Atlantic Ocean north west of the Orkney Islands by U-59 ( Kriegsmarine) with the loss of 27 crew.[3][41][95]
Thrasyvoulos  Greece World War II: The cargo ship (3,693 GRT, 1912) was torpedoed and sunk in the Atlantic Ocean 160 nautical miles (300 km) west of Ireland (49°25′N 11°18′W / 49.417°N 11.300°W / 49.417; -11.300) by U-37 ( Kriegsmarine) with the loss of 22 of her 28 crew. Survivors were rescued by Havmøy ( Norway).[3]

31 October

List of shipwrecks: 31 October 1939
Ship Country Description
Baoulé  France World War II: Convoy 20K: The cargo ship (5,874 GRT, 1921) was shelled and sunk in the Atlantic Ocean 45 nautical miles (83 km) west north west of A Coruña, Spain (43°48′N 9°08′W / 43.800°N 9.133°W / 43.800; -9.133) by U-25 ( Kriegsmarine) with the loss of 13 of her 46 crew.[3][41][96]

Unknown date

List of shipwrecks: Unknown date 1939
Ship Country Description
Safe  Netherlands World War II: The coaster (376 GRT, 1939) left Antwerp, Belgium on the 7th for Riga but never arrived and was lost without a trace with all 7 hands. She probably struck a mine in the North Sea around the 10th.[20][97]

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Ship events in 1939
Ship launches: 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944
Ship commissionings: 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944
Ship decommissionings: 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944
Shipwrecks: 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944