Logan County
Original Logan County courthouse in Russellville
Original Logan County courthouse in Russellville
Map of Kentucky highlighting Logan County
Location within the U.S. state of Kentucky
Map of the United States highlighting Kentucky
Kentucky's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 36°52′N 86°53′W / 36.86°N 86.88°W / 36.86; -86.88
Country United States
State Kentucky
FoundedSeptember 1, 1792 (created)
Named forBenjamin Logan
SeatRussellville
Largest cityRussellville
Area
 • Total557 sq mi (1,440 km2)
 • Land552 sq mi (1,430 km2)
 • Water4.9 sq mi (13 km2)  0.9%%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total27,432
 • Estimate 
(2021)
27,771 Increase
 • Density49/sq mi (19/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district1st
Websitelogancounty.ky.gov

Logan County is a county in the southwest Pennyroyal Plateau area of the U.S. Commonwealth of Kentucky. As of the 2020 census, the population was 27,432.[1] Its county seat is Russellville.[2]

History

The county is named for Benjamin Logan, who had been second in command of the Kentucky militia during the American Revolutionary War and was a leader in bringing statehood to the area.[3][4] Created from Lincoln County on September 1, 1792, Logan was the 13th Kentucky county in order of formation.[5] Its original territory stretched from the Mississippi in the west to the Little Barren River in the east, and from the Green and Ohio Rivers in the north to the Tennessee border on the south; since then, 28 other counties have been formed within that area.[6] The settlement of Logan Court House was made the county seat at its incorporation under the name Russellville.

Future President Andrew Jackson fought a pistol duel against Charles Dickinson at Harrison's Mill in Logan County on May 30, 1806. Jackson was seriously wounded and Dickinson was killed.[6]

During the post-Reconstruction period, there was considerable racial violence by white mobs against black citizens in Logan County. Racist mobs lynched 12 African Americans in the county during the years between 1877 and 1908; most were killed around the turn of the 20th century. This is a higher total than in all but one other county in the state.[7] Four men were killed in a mass lynching on August 1, 1908, in Russellville, during the civil unrest associated with the Black Patch Tobacco Wars. Sharecroppers Joseph Riley, and Virgil, Robert, and Thomas Jones,[8] the last three members of the same family, were all hanged from the same cedar tree. They were the last persons lynched in Logan county.[9]

Logan was a major tobacco-growing county, with Dark Fired Tobacco produced by a special smoke processing. From 1906 some of its farmers became involved in the violent Black Patch Tobacco Wars, joining the Dark Tobacco District Planters' Protective Association of Kentucky and Tennessee to mobilize against the monopoly power of the American Tobacco Company, which had driven down prices to where farmers could barely make a living. Paramilitary Night Riders threatened other tobacco planters to "persuade" them to join the PPA. In late 1907 and early 1908, hundreds of Night Riders conducted raids against tobacco warehouses in some Kentucky towns. They struck Russellville on January 3, 1908, taking over the city and dynamiting two tobacco factories.[10]

21st century

In 2009, the Logan County/Russellville Little League Baseball team won the Little League World Series Great Lakes Regional Tournament as the 4th team from Kentucky to do so (as of 2017, Kentucky has had seven teams win the Great Lakes Tournament) to represent the Great Lakes Region in the Little League World Series.[11]

Geography

Logan County is on the south border of Kentucky; its south line abuts the north line of Tennessee. Its low hills are completely devoted to agriculture or urban development.[12] Its highest point (868 feet/265 meters ASL) is Rainbow Rock Knob WSW, located 3.6 miles (5.8 km) ESE from Russellville.[13] The Red River flows northwestward through the central and west part of the county, discharging into Todd County on the west.[12]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 557 square miles (1,440 km2), of which 552 square miles (1,430 km2) is land and 4.9 square miles (13 km2) (0.9%) is water.[14]

Adjacent counties

Lakes

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
18005,807
181012,123108.8%
182014,42319.0%
183013,012−9.8%
184013,6154.6%
185016,58121.8%
186019,02114.7%
187020,4297.4%
188024,35819.2%
189023,812−2.2%
190025,9949.2%
191024,977−3.9%
192023,633−5.4%
193021,875−7.4%
194023,3456.7%
195022,335−4.3%
196020,896−6.4%
197021,7934.3%
198024,13810.8%
199024,4161.2%
200026,5738.8%
201026,8351.0%
202027,4322.2%
2021 (est.)27,771[15]1.2%
U.S. Decennial Census[16]
1790–1960[17] 1900–1990[18]
1990–2000[19] 2010–2020[1]

2000 Census

As of the census, of 2000, there were 26,573 people, 10,506 households, and 7,574 families in the county. The population density was 48 per square mile (19/km2). There were 11,875 housing units at an average density of 21 per square mile (8.1/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 90.70% White, 7.62% Black or African American, 0.21% Native American, 0.17% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.33% from other races, and 0.96% from two or more races. 1.08% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 10,506 households, out of which 33.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.20% were married couples living together, 11.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.90% were non-families. 25.00% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.40% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.50 and the average family size was 2.96.

The county population contained 25.70% under the age of 18, 8.40% from 18 to 24, 28.50% from 25 to 44, 23.60% from 45 to 64, and 13.80% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 93.10 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.40 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $32,474, and the median income for a family was $39,307. Males had a median income of $29,750 versus $20,265 for females. The per capita income for the county was $15,962. About 10.80% of families and 15.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.50% of those under age 18 and 18.60% of those age 65 or over.

Communities

Cities

Unincorporated places

Attractions

Notable people

Politics

United States presidential election results for Logan County, Kentucky[23]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 9,067 73.42% 3,094 25.05% 189 1.53%
2016 7,778 71.36% 2,755 25.28% 366 3.36%
2012 6,899 65.64% 3,469 33.01% 142 1.35%
2008 6,925 63.59% 3,811 35.00% 154 1.41%
2004 6,815 64.03% 3,768 35.40% 61 0.57%
2000 5,344 57.27% 3,885 41.63% 103 1.10%
1996 3,888 44.15% 4,181 47.47% 738 8.38%
1992 3,710 41.93% 4,064 45.93% 1,075 12.15%
1988 4,295 55.74% 3,379 43.85% 31 0.40%
1984 4,889 58.83% 3,347 40.28% 74 0.89%
1980 3,366 43.26% 4,264 54.80% 151 1.94%
1976 2,430 32.89% 4,850 65.64% 109 1.48%
1972 3,573 57.86% 2,459 39.82% 143 2.32%
1968 3,402 39.16% 3,339 38.44% 1,946 22.40%
1964 2,232 26.28% 6,234 73.39% 28 0.33%
1960 4,117 46.59% 4,719 53.41% 0 0.00%
1956 2,855 34.93% 5,299 64.83% 20 0.24%
1952 2,758 35.86% 4,917 63.94% 15 0.20%
1948 1,352 22.45% 4,355 72.31% 316 5.25%
1944 2,211 30.13% 5,110 69.63% 18 0.25%
1940 2,268 25.46% 6,631 74.44% 9 0.10%
1936 1,812 26.86% 4,912 72.82% 21 0.31%
1932 2,778 28.01% 7,072 71.31% 67 0.68%
1928 4,858 55.79% 3,843 44.13% 7 0.08%
1924 3,705 42.80% 4,772 55.13% 179 2.07%
1920 3,948 38.99% 6,111 60.36% 66 0.65%
1916 2,501 42.05% 3,373 56.71% 74 1.24%
1912 1,632 32.80% 2,697 54.21% 646 12.98%


See also

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 14, 2022.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ The Register of the Kentucky State Historical Society, Vol. 1. Kentucky State Historical Society. 1903. p. 36.
  4. ^ Collins, Lewis (1877). History of Kentucky. p. 479. ISBN 9780722249208.
  5. ^ Collins, Lewis (1882). Collins' Historical Sketches of Kentucky: History of Kentucky, Vol. 2. Collins & Company. p. 26.
  6. ^ a b Richardson, Evelyn B. Kentucky Encyclopedia, p. 568. "Logan County". University Press of Kentucky (Lexington), 1992. Accessed July 27, 2013.
  7. ^ Lynching in America/ Supplement: Lynchings by County[permanent dead link], 3rd Ed. (2015) p. 5
  8. ^ "Lynching in Russellville, Logan County, Kentucky", Photographic postcard, Oshkosh Public Museum
  9. ^ George C. Wright, Racial Violence in Kentucky, 1865--1940: Lynchings, Mob Rule, and "Legal Lynchings", LSU Press (1996) pp. 124-125
  10. ^ Griffin, Mark. Stand There and Tremble: When the Night Riders Came to Russellville . Pumpkin Bomb Press (2008)
  11. ^ "Little League Baseball". www.littleleague.org. Archived from the original on June 11, 2010. Retrieved August 9, 2017.
  12. ^ a b c Logan County KY (Google Maps, accessed August 29, 2020)
  13. ^ Logan (Highest Point) (PeakBagger.com, accessed August 29, 2020)
  14. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". US Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on August 12, 2014. Retrieved August 17, 2014.
  15. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Counties: April 1, 2020 to July 1, 2021". Retrieved August 14, 2022.
  16. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 17, 2014.
  17. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved August 17, 2014.
  18. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 17, 2014.
  19. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 17, 2014.
  20. ^ Richelieu KY (Google Maps, accessed August 29, 2020)
  21. ^ Richelieu (Auburn KY). Accessed August 29, 2020)
  22. ^ Alex C. Finley. 1876, Reprint c. 2000. The History of Russellville and Logan County, Ky. Reprint: Russellville, Ky.: A. B. Willhite. 21–23, 25, 42 (numbering from reprint).
  23. ^ Leip, David. "Atlas of US Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved July 4, 2018.

Coordinates: 36°52′N 86°53′W / 36.86°N 86.88°W / 36.86; -86.88