This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed.Find sources: "Los Angeles Metro bus fleet" – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (January 2015) (Learn how and when to remove this message)
Metro buses and a Foothill Transit bus at El Monte Station (2012)

The Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (also known as "Metro", "MTA", or "LACMTA") operates a vast fleet of buses for its Metro Bus and Metro Busway services. As of September 2019, Metro has the third largest bus fleet in North America with 2,320 buses.

Overview

Metro and its predecessor agencies (LAMTA, 1951–64; RTD, 1964–93) have ordered buses from many manufacturers, including GM, Flxible, Grumman, AM General, Transportation Manufacturing Corporation (TMC), Neoplan USA, New Flyer Industries, ElDorado National, Orion Bus Industries, Thomas Built Buses, Blue Bird Corporation, and North American Bus Industries (NABI).

Emissions reduction

Metro has purchased buses using alternative fuels to diesel, generally consuming compressed natural gas (CNG), since the mid-1990s. The CNG fleet reduces emissions of particulates by 90%, carbon monoxide by 80%, and greenhouse gases by 20%. Alternative fuel buses have logged more than 450,000,000 mi (720,000,000 km) of operation since 1993, an industry record.

In 2015, a battery electric BYD K11M demonstrator was used on the G Line. Metro has committed to move the entire fleet to zero emissions by 2030, ahead of the California Air Resources Board's Innovative Clean Transit requirement for California transit operators to transition by 2040. Since then, the deadline has been pushed back to 2032. Metro board members subsequently rejected a move to delay fleet electrification until 2035. As a first step, the G (formerly Orange) Line will move to full zero-emissions operation by 2020, followed by the J (formerly Silver) Line as soon as possible after that.[1]: 28  The G/Orange Line transitioned to all-electric operation by October 2021, using a fleet of 40 New Flyer Xcelsior XE60 Charge NG buses. Each bus has a range of approximately 150 mi (240 km), and rapid overhead charging stations were installed at the North Hollywood, Canoga, and Chatsworth stations.[2]

As of the end of June 2024, due to heat stress and reliability issues with on route charging equipment, Metro has begun using 40-foot (12 m) CNG powered buses to supplement the G Line's dedicated battery-electric fleet.[3] This undoes the G Line's electrification achievement, a long-standing Metro-touted victory[4] in its troubled history of attempting to electrify its bus fleet.[5][6][7] The de-electrification of the G Line is despite the board's recent direction to devise a new plan for electrification as soon as possible.[8] Though many of Metro's previous failures have been attributed to its dealings with BYD, the problematic charging equipment on the G Line is manufactured by Siemens, and the buses on the G Line are manufactured by New Flyer.

Vehicle technology

Interior of NABI 31-LFW (2016), looking forward. A screen is still installed over the front curb-side wheel, but is not being used.

Metro has also increased its use of on-board vehicle technology. Many buses were equipped with monitors to display real-time bus maps to show the location through GPS navigation starting in 2004; this the first of its kind in the United States. Later, the screens began showing Transit TV broadcasts,[9] including local news programs, starting in August 2006.[10][11]

The screens were shut off and Transit TV service was discontinued in early 2015, as more passengers were relying on their personal mobile devices, such as cell phones, smartphones, and electronic tablets, for entertainment while riding the buses.[12] The increased use of personal mobile devices by passengers led to the implementation of WiFi on all buses by April 2017. Also, as part of Metro's Advanced Transportation Management System (ATMS) project, most buses include a marquee displaying the date and time, Automatic Voice Annunciation (AVA) for audio and visual announcements of each stop,[13] and an audio and visual "Stop Requested" announcement was added to all buses in 2008. A supplemental audio announcement of "For your safety, watch your step when exiting the bus" was added to all buses on February 28, 2013, and changed voice in March 2015.

Bus fleet

Timeline

When it was formed in 1993, Metro inherited a large fleet of GM/TMC RTS diesel buses; these were initially replaced by Neoplan USA Transliner buses as they aged and retired. Starting in the early 2000s, the primary supplier to the Metro bus fleet was NABI, over a period of approximately 15 years. As one of its largest clients, Metro had considerable influence on NABI designs, including its bus rapid transit vehicles, the 60-BRT designed for the G Line[14]: 13  and the composite-bodied Metro 45C, which was named after the agency and shared with Valley Metro.[15]: 20 

After NABI’s closure in 2015, several variants of the New Flyer Xcelsior and the ENC Axess were purchased to replace the NABI fleet.

As of September 2019, Metro has the third largest bus fleet in North America with 2,320 buses, behind New York City's Metropolitan Transportation Authority (5,825) and New Jersey's NJ Transit (3,003).[16] Metro operates the nation's largest fleet of compressed natural gas powered buses.[17][needs update]

757 CNG buses are scheduled to be converted to battery-electric during their midlife refits in 2027 and 2028 as part of Metro's efforts to operate an entirely zero-emission fleet by 2032.[18] This will consist primarily of 2020 and later ENC Axess vehicles but may include what are currently New Flyer XN60s.

Active fleet

Make/Model Fleet Numbers Thumbnail Year Length
ft (m)
Propulsion Divisions Notes
ENC Axess BRT 40’ CNG 1505–2061
2018–2022 40 (12) CNG 1, 3, 8, 9, 15, 18, MV
  • Units 1565, 1568, and 1569 sustained severe damage on May 27, 2020, in a fire inside a bus yard and have been retired
NABI 31-LFW 3100–3149
2009–2010 31 (9.4) CNG MV, ST,
  • Some units sold and others scrapped; soon to retire completely
  • Strictly contractor operated
New Flyer XN40 3850–4199
LACMTA 4139
LACMTA 4139
2015–2016 40 (12) CNG 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 9, 13, 15,
5600–6149 2013–2015 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 9, 13, 15, 18, MV, ST,
  • Some units have begun their mid-life rehab
NABI Metro 45C CNG 8100–8491
Refurbished unit 8346
unit 8603 bound for Santa Monica
2008–2011 45 (14) CNG 1, 3, 7, 8, 13, 15, 18, ST,
  • Some units sold and others scrapped; soon to retire completely
8500–8649 2012–2013 3, 7, 13, 15, 18
New Flyer XN60 8700–8834 2018–2021 60 (18) CNG 1, 7, 13, 15, 18
NABI 60-BRT 9500–9594 2007–2008 60 (18) CNG 1, 5, 7, 13, 15
BYD K9MD 10000–10004
2021 40 (12) Battery electric 9, 18
  • Used on J Line and local service
10005-10099 2024 9, CMF
  • ~40 units to be assigned to the J line, remainder will be used for D9 local service
  • Some units being delivered, others entering service currently or undergoing acceptance testing
  • These units are extended range ER models[19]
BYD K11M 19000–19004 2020 60 (18) Battery electric 8
New Flyer XE60[20] 19500–19539 2019–2020 60 (18) Battery electric 8
  • Replaced all Metro Liner NABI 60-BRT units

Future

Fleet Numbers Status Thumbnail Manufacturer Model Engine Transmission Notes
(100 buses) RFP Released* New Flyer XHE40 Hydrogen Fuel cell buses. Base order of 20 buses and 4 options of 20 FCEBs per option for a total procurement of 100 buses. [1] *Contract will go to New Flyer as NFI is the only OEM in the North American market that produces Hydrogen Fuel Cell buses
(1,060 buses) RFP Released TBD TBD battery electric; base order of 260 buses and 4 options of 200 BEBs for a total of 1,060 [2].

Retired

Make/Model Length Picture Year Numbers
(quantity ordered)
Paint Schemes Propulsion
Gillig Spirit 28 foot 1990 600
(1 bus)
Yellow Jacket Diesel
Gillig Phantom 40 foot 1991 813-817
(4 buses)
None Diesel
ElDorado National Aerolite 21 foot 1998 0005
(1 bus)
Yellow Jacket Propane
Ford Econoline 350 25 foot 1989 0006
(1 bus)
Yellow Jacket Diesel
GMC RTS-04 (T8J-204) 40 foot 1980-81 0023-0025
(3 buses)
Purple Connector Diesel
ElDorado National Aerotech 25 foot 1997 0025
(1 bus)
Yellow Jacket Propane
Gillig Phantom 40 foot 1994 1000-1010
(10 buses)
None Diesel
BYD K9 39 foot 2014 1001-1005
(5 buses)
Metro Local Electric
Neoplan USA AN440A/3 40 foot 1987 1100-1189
(89 buses)
Yellow Jacket Diesel
TMC RTS-06 (T80-206) 40 foot 1992 1200-1502
(302 buses)
Yellow Jacket
Metro Local
Diesel
Flxible Metro B CNG 40 foot 1989 1800-1809
(9 buses)
Tri Stripe CNG
TMC RTS-06 (T80-206) 40 foot 1989 1970-1999
(30 buses)
Yellow Jacket

Metro Local

Diesel
1988 2000-2266
(266 buses)
Yellow Jacket

Metro Local

Diesel
1993 2006
(1 bus)
None Diesel
1989 2300-2402
(102 buses)
Yellow Jacket Diesel
Flxible Metro B 40 foot 1988 2500-2649
(149 buses)
Yellow Jacket Diesel
1989 2700-2764
(64 buses)
Yellow Jacket Diesel
1990 2800-2870
(70 buses)
Yellow Jacket Diesel
1992 2900-2932
(32 buses)
Yellow Jacket Diesel
New Flyer D40LF 40 foot 1998 3000-3019
(19 buses)
Metro Local Diesel
Neoplan USA AN440A 40 foot 1983-84 3300-3714
(314 buses)
Yellow Jacket Diesel
NABI 42-BRT 42 foot 2008-09 4200-4205
(5 buses)
Metro Local Gasoline-Electric
GMC RTS-04 (T7J-604) 35 foot 1982 4400-4434
(34 buses)
Yellow Jacket

Metro Local

Diesel
GMC RTS-04 (T8J-604) 40 foot 1983 4452-4471
(20 buses)
Blank Diesel
Neoplan USA AN440 40 foot 1995-96 4500-4695
(195 buses)
Metro Local CNG
1996-97 4696-4793
(97 buses)
Metro Local CNG
New Flyer C40HF 40 foot 1999-2000 5000-5222
(122 buses)
Metro Local CNG
New Flyer C40LF 40 foot 2000-01 5300-5522
(223 buses)
Yellow Jacket

Metro Local Metro Rapid Metro Express

CNG
Neoplan USA AN440 40 foot 1997-98 6301-6600
(299 buses)
Metro Local CNG
1999 6700-6799
(100 buses)
Metro Local CNG
NABI 40-LFW 40 foot 1999-2000 7000-7214
(215 buses)
Metro Local

Metro Rapid Metro Express

CNG
2000-01 7300-7514
(215 buses)
Metro Local

Metro Rapid

CNG
2005 7525-7599
(75 buses)
Metro Local

Metro Rapid

CNG
Grumman Flxible 870 40 foot 1980 7500-7729
(229 buses)
RTD Tri-Shape

Yellow Jacket

Diesel
NABI 40-LFW 40 foot 2001-02 7600-7949
(350 buses)
Metro Local

Metro Rapid

CNG
NABI 40C-LFW 40 foot 2002-03 7980-7999
(20 buses)
Metro Local

Metro Rapid

CNG
NABI 45C-LFW 2003-2004 8000-8099
Metro Local

Metro Rapid Metro Liner

CNG
GMC RTS-04 (T8J-204) 40 foot 1980-81 8200-9139
(939 buses)
ATE Ryder

RTD Tri-Stripe

Yellow Jacket

Diesel
MAN-AMG SG-220-18-2A 60 foot 1978 9250-9259
(9 buses)
RTD Tri-Stripe Diesel
NABI 60-BRT 60 foot 2004-06 9200-9399
(200 buses)
Metro Local

Metro Rapid Metro Liner

CNG
2006-07 9400-9495
(96 buses)
Metro Local

Metro Rapid Metro Liner

CNG
Neoplan USA AN122/3 Skyliner 40 foot 1981 9902-9921
(19 buses)
RTD Tri-Stripe Diesel
Thomas TL960 40 foot 2001 9950-9969
(19 buses)
Metro Local Diesel
Blue Bird CSRE 3703 37 foot 2001 9970-9975
(5 buses)
Metro Local Diesel
Gillig Phantom 40 foot 1994 9976
(1 bus)
Metro Local Diesel
1989 9977
(1 bus)
Metro Local Diesel
1993-94 9978-9980
(3 buses)
Metro Local Diesel
New Flyer D30LF 30 foot 1997-98 9981-9983
(3 buses)
Metro Local Diesel
Orion VI 40 foot 2000-01 11001-11067
(67 buses)
Metro Local Diesel
ElDorado National MST II 32 foot 2002 12501-12536
(35 buses)
Yellow Jacket Diesel
ElDorado National E-Z Rider II 30 foot 2003 12556-12570
(14 buses)
Metro Local Propane
Gillig Phantom 40 foot 1988 19088, 19097,
19098, 19101,
19102, 19115,
19126, 19127
(8 buses)
Yellow Jacket Diesel
35 foot 1983 805213
(1 bus)
Yellow Jacket Diesel

Liveries

Predecessors

In 1971, RTD took delivery of the first units of its Flxible New Look fleet, painted in a "Copperhead" livery which RTD described as "orange and champagne".[21] The livery, as implemented on its GM and Flxible "New Look" fleet, had the window area painted in ochre yellow and the lower body and front painted in champagne/copper, separated by a broad silver or white stripe down the sides. When RTD introduced a 25 cent flat-fare program in 1974, some of the reserve buses pressed into service were painted a plain white instead of "Copperhead".[22] In 1976, the existing GM Old Look bus fleet were repainted in the new "Copperhead" livery.[23] RTD introduced an "Express" livery in 1977, colored yellow, white, and black, with a broad wedge-shaped stripe down the side.[24]

RTD introduced the "Tri-Stripe" livery in March 1980, designed by Saul Bass and Herb Yager, starting with the existing Grumman/Flxible 870 fleet and continuing with the Rapid Transit Series scheduled for delivery in October 1980. Under this scheme, the window area was painted black and the base was painted white, separated by red, orange, and yellow stripes.[25] The Bass/Yager firm was engaged to rebrand the agency, including a new logo, in June 1979 after the increase in ridership driven by the 1979 oil crisis proved that many residents were unfamiliar with RTD.[26] The oldest "Old Look", which was also the first diesel bus to operate in Los Angeles starting from 1950, was retired with the delivery of the last RTS in June 1981.[27] Most of the existing "New Look" fleet was repainted in the Bass/Yager "Tri-Stripe" livery by August 1984.[28] "Tri-Stripe" was simplified in the early 1990s to facilitate graffiti removal.[29]

Initial stripe schemes

Buses inherited from RTD generally carried over a simplified "RTD Tri-Stripe" livery; the base color of the bus was white (including the window area) with a triple-stacked stripe of red, orange, and yellow extending from the base of the windshield down the sides of the bus, carried below the side windows. This was simplified to "Red Stripe", white with a double-stacked stripe of red and yellow in the same position, and "Yellow Jacket" in 1997, white with a double-stacked gold stripe in the same position, featuring a stylized text logo "Metro Bus" prominently on the front and sides of the bus.[30]

Service livery

Starting in the early 2000s, the "Metro Service" livery was implemented under the leadership of creative director Michael Lejeune and lead designer Neil Sadler.[31] The base color of buses, visible on the lower edge and the extended roof cap for CNG storage, was Silver / Pantone 877 C metallic, supplemented by a broad stripe starting just below the side windows and extending to the top of the bus, denoting the service type:[32]

The colors are supplemented by text restating the service type in the FF Scala Sans typeface, bold weight.[32][33] This branding scheme won an honor award from the Society for Experiential Graphic Design in 2007.[34] Since then, the Express services have been scaled back and the colors have been modified.[35]

Simplification

Typically, the supplemental text agree with the livery, such as Metro Local used with the Poppy Orange color. However as of late 2020, Metro dropped the text specification for newer buses and those undergoing their midlife refit. Since then, beginning with the second batch of New Flyer XN60s delivered in 2020-2021 and newer (buses 8765 and newer), buses are now simply labeled "Metro Bus" echoing the "Yellow Jacket" livery while buses still retain the "Service" color distinctions for local, rapid, and liner liveries. New Flyer XE60s used to replace the G Line fleet and convert it to zero-emissions operation were delivered before this change in late 2020, and as such, use a "Go Metro" label not found on other buses. Other buses feature a large text "Go Metro" on their roof rails, however not as a bus label such as "Metro Rapid", "Metro Local", or "Metro Bus". Since then, BYD K-series vehicles on the J line and newer buses have adopted the "Metro Bus" labels, defining that label as the preferred option moving forward.

The XE60s that replaced the NABI Metro Liners on the G (Orange) line dropped the orange accents and text colors so they could be used elsewhere without too much confusion. Although there are currently no other divisions or lines that are equipped with the required supporting infrastructure, Metro may need to conduct early replacement of the XE60s in favor of larger, potentially double-articulated vehicles for the G line, as the line is at capacity and needs an upgrade before its eventual conversion to light rail. Thus, the flexible branding enables Metro to reassign the XE60s currently belonging to the G line without needing to take them out of service for re-brands.

With the same logic, new J line buses are no longer branded with the tagline "A faster way to downtown" as old J line buses are entering service on other routes such as the 2 with the addition of BYD K9Ms to electrify the J line and the fact that new electric busway-designated buses are also sometimes used on innagural runs of new routes such as the 33 in addition to local service and thus don't feature exclusive branding to the busway line the bus is normally usually assigned to.

Metro Bus & Rail divisions

Map
About OpenStreetMaps
Maps: terms of use
8km
5miles
24
23
22
21
20
19
El Monte Station
18
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
  
Operating divisions of Los Angeles Metro
  •  Bus 
  •  Non-revenue / closed 
  •  Rail (A) 
  •  Rail (B/D) 
  •  Rail (C) 
  •  Rail (E) 
  •  Rail (K) 

1
Downtown LA / Central City
2
Downtown LA / Crossroads Depot
3
Cypress Park
4
Non-revenue (Downey)
5
Arthur Winston
6
Venice
7
West Hollywood
8
Chatsworth / West Valley
9
El Monte
10
Los Angeles
11
Metro A Line (Long Beach)
12
Inactive vehicles (Long Beach)
13
Downtown LA
14
Metro E Line (Santa Monica)
15
Sun Valley
16
Metro C/K Line (Westchester)
17
Maple Terminal
18
South Bay
19
El Monte Station
20
Metro B/D Line (Los Angeles River)
21
Metro E Line (Elysian Park)
22
Metro C Line (Hawthorne)
23
La Veranda Apartments
24
Metro A Line (Monrovia)

Under the Metro governance structure, the routes operating out of each division are supervised by an integrated/centralized operations division with oversight provided by one of five Service Councils covering a distinct geographical region of Los Angeles County. Each Service Council has a three-letter abbreviation.[36]

Service Councils[36][37]
Council Abbv Region Cities († council meeting site)
Gateway Cities[38] GWC southeast Artesia, Avalon, Bell, Bellflower, Bell Gardens, Cerritos, Commerce, Compton, Cudahy, Downey, Hawaiian Gardens, †Huntington Park, La Habra Heights, Lakewood, La Mirada, Long Beach, Lynwood, Maywood, Norwalk, Paramount, Pico Rivera, Santa Fe Springs, Signal Hill, South Gate, Vernon, Walnut Park, Whittier
San Fernando Valley[39] SFV northwest Agoura Hills, Burbank, Calabasas, Glendale, Hidden Hills, Los Angeles (valley area incl. †Van Nuys), San Fernando Westlake Village
San Gabriel Valley[40] SGV northeast Alhambra, Altadena, Arcadia, Baldwin Park, Covina, Diamond Bar, Duarte, East Los Angeles, †El Monte, Industry, Irwindale, La Cañada Flintridge, La Puente, Monrovia, Montebello, Monterey Park, Pasadena, Pomona, Rosemead, San Gabriel, San Marino, Sierra Madre, South El Monte, South Pasadena, Temple City, Walnut, West Covina
South Bay[41] SBC (SBA) southwest Carson, El Segundo, Gardena, Hawthorne, Hermosa Beach, Inglewood, Lawndale, †Lennox, Lomita, Los Angeles (Harbor City, Harbor Gateway, San Pedro and Wilmington), Manhattan Beach, Palos Verdes Estates, Rancho Palos Verdes, Redondo Beach, Rolling Hills, Rolling Hills Estates, Torrance, Westchester
Westside/Central[42] WSC (WES) west & central Beverly Hills, Culver City, †Los Angeles, Malibu, Santa Monica, West Hollywood

Each Service Council is composed of elected officials, appointed representatives, and transit users from a given area served by each division. While the Councils have geographical boundaries, in practice they only define where the members come from, as most of Los Angeles is served by routes operating out of multiple sectors. For instance, the former Olympic Boulevard Rapid bus was operated by buses from the San Gabriel Valley sector, despite its entire route being in the Westside or Central Los Angeles areas.

Detail at the base of the driver's-side windshield, declaring the bus fleet number (9321), service council ('WSC' for Westside/Central), and operating division (10)

Decals with service sector abbreviations and division numbers are affixed to the windows of Metro buses. A list of routes operating from each sector can be found in the Service Council Bylaws.[37]

Division 3 in Cypress Park is the oldest bus yard owned by Metro, operating since 1907. About 200 buses currently operate out of the yard.

The following table lists all current bus divisions (rail divisions are not included):[43][44]

Number Name Sector
1 Central City Gateway Cities
2 Crossroads Depot Gateway Cities
3 North Los Angeles, Cypress Park San Gabriel Valley
4 (non-revenue vehicles) Gateway Cities
5 Arthur Winston/Mid-Cities South Bay
7 West Hollywood Westside/Central
8 West Valley San Fernando Valley
9 El Monte, San Gabriel Valley San Gabriel Valley
10 East Los Angeles (all retiring vehicles, construction staging for other divisions) Gateway Cities
13 Downtown Los Angeles Central Maintenance Facility (CMF)
15 East Valley San Fernando Valley
18 South Bay South Bay

Division 10 was closed for revenue service during the COVID-19 pandemic in September 2020. Vehicles were re-assigned, however Metro has kept the property. It will be used to store other buses when their respective divisions are being equipped for zero-emissions revenue service. Due to the nature of the upgrades required at each division, some divisions may need to temporarily relocate their current CNG buses to have enough space for construction.[45]

Closed divisions

The following table lists all former divisions.

Number Name
6 Venice
12 Long Beach
14 South Los Angeles[46]
16 Pomona

See also

References

  1. ^ Metro Countywide Sustainability Annual Report (PDF) (Report). Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transit Authority. March 2019. Archived (PDF) from the original on August 16, 2021. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  2. ^ Honor, Joni; Sotero, Dave (October 13, 2021). "L.A. Metro Now Running all Zero-Emission Electric Buses on the G (Orange) Line in the San Fernando Valley" (Press release). Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transit Authority. Archived from the original on December 30, 2021. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  3. ^ "G Line - Pantograph App". Retrieved June 27, 2024.
  4. ^ "This is 30: On electrifying the G Line". Retrieved June 27, 2024.
  5. ^ "L.A. Times Investigation Tells Sad Story of Attempts to Electrify the City's Bus Fleet". Retrieved June 27, 2024.
  6. ^ "Stalls, stops and breakdowns: Problems plague push for electric buses". Retrieved June 27, 2024.
  7. ^ "BYD's confidential Metro evaluations". Retrieved June 27, 2024.
  8. ^ "LA Metro Board Report". Retrieved July 2, 2024.
  9. ^ "Transit TV". Archived from the original on November 2, 2008.
  10. ^ "Metro's Transit TV to Carry Local News in English, Spanish" (PDF). NBC Los Angeles. February 22, 2007. Archived (PDF) from the original on December 30, 2021. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  11. ^ James, Meg (October 29, 2013). "KNBC-TV playing to viewers on L.A. County buses". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on December 30, 2021. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  12. ^ Hymon, Steve (February 10, 2015). "Metro statement on Transit TV monitors on buses". The Source [blog]. Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Archived from the original on October 27, 2021. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  13. ^ "Advanced Transportation Management System (ATMS)". Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Archived from the original on February 7, 2005.
  14. ^ Flynn, Jennifer; Thole, Cheryl; Perk, Victoria; Samus, Joseph; Van Nostrand, Caleb (October 2011). Metro Orange Line BRT Project Evaluation (PDF) (Report). Federal Transit Administration. Archived (PDF) from the original on January 6, 2020. Retrieved October 1, 2020.
  15. ^ Peak, Matt; Henke, Cliff; Wnuk, Lawrence (June 2005). Bus Rapid Transit Ridership Analysis (PDF) (Report). Federal Transportation Administration. Archived (PDF) from the original on December 30, 2021. Retrieved October 1, 2020.
  16. ^ Roman, Alex (September 17, 2019). "Top 100 Bus Fleets Survey". Metro Magazine. Archived from the original on July 28, 2020. Retrieved July 28, 2020.
  17. ^ "Next Stop: Fresh Air". www.metro.net. Archived from the original on March 8, 2018. Retrieved July 28, 2020.
  18. ^ "LA Metro Rollout Plan" (PDF).
  19. ^ "Metro Board Report: EXECUTE CONTRACT MODIFICATION WITH BYD FOR VEHICLE TELEMATICS AND CHARGE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM, AND K9MD-ER EXTENDED RANGE BUSES".
  20. ^ "LA Metro awards a contract to New Flyer for up to 100 Xcelsior Battery-electric 60-foot transit buses to advance its Clean Transit Agenda". New Flyer Industries. October 10, 2017. Archived from the original on October 6, 2020. Retrieved September 26, 2020.
  21. ^ "First Contingent of 200 New Air-Conditioned Buses Arrives at South Park Shops" (PDF). RTD Flyer. Vol. 1, no. 1. Southern California Rapid Transit District. June 1, 1971. p. 5. Archived (PDF) from the original on February 18, 2022. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  22. ^ "Great start for 25c flat fare" (PDF). Headway. Vol. 1, no. 8. Southern California Rapid Transit District. April 16, 1974. pp. 1–2. Archived (PDF) from the original on September 18, 2021. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  23. ^ "Getting a New Look" (PDF). Headway. Vol. 3, no. 1. Southern California Rapid Transit District. January 1976. p. 4. Archived (PDF) from the original on April 5, 2023. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  24. ^ "RTD Begins Full-Scale Airport Service" (PDF). Headway. Vol. 4, no. 3. Southern California Rapid Transit District. March 1977. p. 1. Archived (PDF) from the original on November 17, 2019. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  25. ^ "RTD unveils system-wide visual identification program featuring new logo, bus paint scheme" (PDF). Headway. Vol. 7, no. 3. Southern California Rapid Transit District. March 1980. p. 1. Archived (PDF) from the original on December 30, 2021. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  26. ^ "Firm developing 'new look' for District" (PDF). Headway. Vol. 6, no. 9. Southern California Rapid Transit District. September 1979. p. 1. Archived (PDF) from the original on December 30, 2021. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  27. ^ "Old 6500 heads for the pasture" (PDF). Headway. Vol. 8, no. 7. Southern California Rapid Transit District. July 1981. p. 4. Archived (PDF) from the original on October 29, 2020. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  28. ^ "South Park operation gives RTD a new look" (PDF). Headway. Vol. 9, no. 2. Southern California Rapid Transit District. February 1982. p. 7. Archived (PDF) from the original on June 2, 2022. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  29. ^ "Back in Business" (PDF). Headway. Vol. 20, no. 10. Southern California Rapid Transit District. October 1992. p. 20. Archived (PDF) from the original on December 30, 2021. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  30. ^ "MTA Goes for the Gold" (PDF). MTA Review. March 1997. Archived (PDF) from the original on December 30, 2021. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  31. ^ Jaffe, Eric (August 26, 2015). "The Making of the L.A. Metro 'M'". Bloomberg CityLab. Archived from the original on December 30, 2021. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  32. ^ a b "Metro Signage Standards" (PDF). Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority. January 14, 2013. Archived (PDF) from the original on December 30, 2021. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  33. ^ Shapiro, Ellen (September 2006). "Metro Design Studio". CommArts. Archived from the original on December 30, 2021. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  34. ^ "Los Angeles Metro: Honor Award". Society for Experiential Graphic Design. October 28, 2013. Archived from the original on December 30, 2021. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  35. ^ "Making Metro: Color". Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Archived from the original on December 30, 2021. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  36. ^ a b "Local Service Councils". Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Archived from the original on January 14, 2022. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  37. ^ a b "Scheduled Metro Bus Service Hours and Miles". Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority. June 26, 2011. Archived from the original on March 8, 2013.
  38. ^ "Gateway Cities". Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Archived from the original on January 14, 2022. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  39. ^ "San Fernando Valley". Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Archived from the original on January 14, 2022. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  40. ^ "San Gabriel Valley". Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Archived from the original on January 14, 2022. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  41. ^ "South Bay Cities". Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Archived from the original on June 9, 2022. Retrieved June 9, 2022.
  42. ^ "Westside/Central". Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Archived from the original on June 3, 2022. Retrieved June 9, 2022.
  43. ^ "Metro Operating Divisions and Other Major Facilities" (PDF). Metro. 2016. Archived (PDF) from the original on January 19, 2022. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  44. ^ "Metro Divisions, Locations, Terminals" (PDF). Metro Trip Planner. Archived (PDF) from the original on January 14, 2022. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  45. ^ "LA Metro Rollout Plan" (PDF).
  46. ^ Reclaimed bus yard begins life as urban wetland Archived February 11, 2012, at the Wayback Machine Los Angeles Times February 10, 2012

Liveries