Lothar Lutze
Born(1927-09-07)7 September 1927
Wroclaw, Poland
Died4 March 2015(2015-03-04) (aged 87)
Berlin, Germany
Occupation
  • Scholar
  • writer
  • translator
  • Indologist
Known forHeidleberg Indology
AwardsPadma Shri
Tagore Award
Dr. George Grierson Award

Lothar Lutze (7 September 1927 – 4 March 2015) was a German scholar, writer, translator, Indologist and the Emeritus Professor of the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures at the Heidelberg University. He is known for his research on Hindi literature and Indian culture, which prompted many to classify him under Heidelberg Indologists.[1] He is a recipient of the Tagore Award and the Dr. George Grierson Award of the Central Hindi Directorate of the Government of India.[2] The Government of India honored him again the fourth highest civilian award of the Padma Shri, in 2006, for his contributions to Indian literature.[3]

Biography

Lothar Lutze was born in Breslau/Silesia (since 1945 Wrocław, a city in Western Poland) on 7 September 1927.[4] He was a professor at the South Asia Institute of the University of Heidelberg from 1965 to 1992[5] after which he served as the Emeritus Professor of the institute. He also headed the Delhi office of the institute during three separate periods.[2] He is credited with several publications on South Asian literature,[6] is regarded by many as a scholar on the South Asia culture.[7] The Other Tagore (co-written by Alokeranjan Dasgupta),[8] Hindi Writing in Post-colonial India,[9] Zwölf Lektionen Hindi: Arbeitsheft Für Anfänger,[10] Linguistic Prospects of the Emergence of an Internal Contact Language for India,[11] Hindi as a Second Language: Patterns and Grammatical Notes,[12] Zur Lyrik Alokeranjan Dasguptas,[13] and Feldarbeit[14] are some of his works. He also had several translations of Hindi works into German language to his credit.[1]

Lutze was honored by the South Asia Institute at Goethe-Institut, New Delhi on 7 September 2007 on his 80th birthday where a symposium, A Tribute to Lothar Lutze - Beyond lived Literature, was organized. His life and work has been documented in a book, Tender Ironies: A Tribute to Lothar Lutze, published in 1994.[15] The Government of India honored Lutze with the Tagore Award and the Central Hindi Directorate awarded him the Dr. George Grierson Award in 1994. In 2006, the government included him in the Republic Day Honours list for the civilian award of the Padma Shri for his contributions to Hindi literature.[3]

Lutze died on 4 March 2015 at Berlin, at the age of 88.[2]

Selected bibliography

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "Lothar Lutze - Author Profile". Muse India archives. 2015. Retrieved December 8, 2015.
  2. ^ a b c "Lothar Lutze passes away". University of Heidelberg. 16 March 2015. Retrieved December 8, 2015.
  3. ^ a b "Padma Awards" (PDF). Ministry of Home Affairs, Government of India. 2015. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 15, 2015. Retrieved July 21, 2015.
  4. ^ "Prof. Dr. Lothar Lutze". Here Now 4U. 2015. Retrieved December 8, 2015.
  5. ^ "Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg". South Asia Institute. 19 March 2015. Retrieved December 8, 2015.
  6. ^ "Lutze, Lothar - WorldCat identities". WorldCat. 2015. Retrieved December 8, 2015.
  7. ^ "A Hercules among indologists our time is gone". German Indian Society. 16 March 2015. Retrieved December 8, 2015.
  8. ^ Tagore-At Home in the World. SAGE Publications. 2013. ISBN 9788132110842. Retrieved December 8, 2015.
  9. ^ Lothar Lutze (1985). Hindi Writing in Post-colonial India. Manohar Publications. p. 227. ISBN 9780836414226.
  10. ^ Lothar Lutze (1966). Zwölf Lektionen Hindi: Arbeitsheft Für Anfänger. Südasien-Inst. p. 44.
  11. ^ Lothar Lutze (1968). Linguistic Prospects of the Emergence of an Internal Contact Language for India. Südasien-Institut der Universität Heidelberg. p. 18.
  12. ^ Lothar Lutze; Bahadur Singh (1970). Hindi as a Second Language: Patterns and Grammatical Notes. Rādhā Krishna Prakashan. p. 92.
  13. ^ Lothar Lutze (1971). Zur Lyrik Alokeranjan Dasguptas. Südasien-Inst. d. Univ. Heidelberg. p. 6.
  14. ^ Lothar Lutze (1967). Feldarbeit. Fietkau. p. 34.
  15. ^ Dilip Chitre; Gunther-Dietz Sontheimer; Heidrun Bruckner; Anne Feldhaus; Rainer Kimming (1994). Tender Ironies: A Tribute to Lothar Lutze. South Asia Books. ISBN 9788173040887.