Lucy Turnbull
79th Lord Mayor of Sydney
In office
7 April 2003 – 6 February 2004
DeputyDixie Coulton
Preceded byFrank Sartor
Succeeded byClover Moore
21st Deputy Lord Mayor of Sydney
In office
18 September 1999 – 7 April 2003
Lord MayorFrank Sartor
Preceded byHenry Tsang
Succeeded byDixie Coulton
Councillor of the City of Sydney
In office
September 1999 – 6 February 2004
Spouse of the Prime Minister of Australia
In role
15 September 2015 – 24 August 2018
Preceded byMargie Abbott
Succeeded byJenny Morrison
Personal details
Born
Lucinda Mary Hughes

(1958-03-30) 30 March 1958 (age 63)
Mittagong, New South Wales, Australia
CitizenshipAustralian
Political partyLiving Sydney Independents (1999–2004)
Liberal Party[citation needed]
Spouse(s)
(m. 1980)
Children2
Parent(s)Tom Hughes (father)
RelativesRobert Hughes (uncle)
Geoffrey Forrest Hughes (grandfather)
Thomas Hughes (great-grandfather)
Alma materUniversity of Sydney
University of New South Wales

Lucinda Mary Turnbull AO (née Hughes; born 30 March 1958) is an Australian businesswoman, philanthropist, and former local government politician. She served on the Sydney City Council from 1999 to 2004, including as Lord Mayor of Sydney from 2003 to 2004 – the first woman to hold the position. She has since held positions on a number of urban planning bodies, including as chief commissioner of the Greater Sydney Commission from 2015 to 2020. Her husband Malcolm Turnbull was prime minister of Australia from 2015 to 2018.

Early life and education

Born Lucinda Mary Hughes, Turnbull is the daughter of Tom Hughes, a former Attorney-General of Australia.[1] Her great-grandfather was Sir Thomas Hughes, the first Lord Mayor of Sydney. She was educated at Kincoppal-Rose Bay, Frensham School in Mittagong,[2] Sydney Girls High School[3] and the University of Sydney, where she graduated with a Bachelor of Laws in 1982.[4] Turnbull also holds a Master of Business Administration from the Australian Graduate School of Management of the University of New South Wales. In September 2017, Turnbull received an honorary Doctorate of Letters for her substantial and sustained service and contribution to the University and to the Greater Western Sydney region.[5]

Political career

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Turnbull was elected to Council in 1999 on the Living Sydney independent platform and was immediately elevated to the position of Deputy Lord Mayor, serving under Lord Mayor Frank Sartor. When Sartor resigned as Lord Mayor to enter NSW politics, Turnbull was elected as his replacement.[6] In early 2004, the Carr Labor government dismissed the City of Sydney and South Sydney Councils and forced their amalgamation.[7][8] Turnbull was subsequently appointed as one of three Commissioners assigned with the responsibility of establishing a new governance structure for the merged council entity. Turnbull later recalled, feeling the pressure of the Carr Labor government, approached Clover Moore and encouraged her to run as Lord Mayor in the hope that Labor would not gain control of the City of Sydney.[9]

As Lord Mayor, Turnbull awarded Nobel Peace Prize laureate Aung San Suu Kyi the keys to the city of Sydney in 2003.[10]

Business and community involvement

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With a background in commercial law and investment banking, Turnbull is a Director of Turnbull & Partners Pty Ltd, a private investment company. She also chairs ASX listed biotechnology company Prima Biomed Limited.

Turnbull has a long-standing interest in cities and their planning, governance and management, as well as the importance of technological innovation to the national economy. In 1999, she published a book called Sydney: Biography of a City. She was an independent member of the Sydney Metropolitan Development Authority, which was charged with the urban renewal and revitalisation of several precincts in Sydney, including RedfernWaterloo. She was an independent member of the Redfern–Waterloo Authority from its establishment in 2004 until its repeal in December 2011. She is a former board member of the Australian Technology Park, Redfern. From 2004 until 2011, Turnbull served as Deputy Chair of the Committee for Sydney, a think tank for Greater Sydney representing public, private and not-for-profit sectors and focused on the future of the metropolitan city,[11] and chaired it from 2011 until 2015.

Turnbull is a former deputy chair of the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) City Expert Advisory Panel (appointed July 2010), which reported to the COAG Reform Council. The Expert Panel was charged with preparing a report published on 1 March 2012, advising COAG Reform Council on whether metropolitan planning systems were consistent with agreed COAG criteria.

Turnbull has also been active in the not-for-profit sector. She serves on boards of the Biennale of Sydney, the Redfern Foundation Limited and the Turnbull Foundation. She is the Patron of DICE Kids, an organisation created at Policy Hack in 2015 and Patron of the United States Studies Centre at the University of Sydney. She is also a board member of the NSW Cancer Institute. She has previously chaired the Sydney Children's Hospital Foundation, the Sydney Cancer Centre and the Sydney Festival Limited. From 2006–2010, she was a board member of Melbourne IT and before that a board member of WebCentral Limited.

On 26 January 2011, Turnbull was appointed an Officer of the Order of Australia (AO) for her distinguished service to the community, particularly through philanthropic contributions to, and fundraising support for, a range of medical, social welfare, educational, youth and cultural organisations, to local government, and to business.[12]

In 2012, Turnbull was awarded an honorary Doctorate of Business by the University of NSW,[13] and in 2016 was appointed Adjunct Professor at the Faculty of Built Environment, University of NSW.[14] In 2017, she was awarded an honorary Doctorate of Letters from Western Sydney University which she received for her substantial and sustained service and contribution to the University and the Greater Western Sydney region.[15]

Turnbull chaired the Committee for Sydney from 2012 to 2015. In 2015 she was appointed Chief Commissioner of the Greater Sydney Commission,[16][17] a role she fulfilled until March 2020 when she resigned to work with her husband in their family business.[18]

Turnbull was appointed chair of the Sydney Opera House Trust, commencing 1 January 2021.[19]

Personal life

Turnbull and her husband, Malcolm Turnbull, in January 2012
Turnbull and her husband, Malcolm Turnbull, in January 2012

Lucy Hughes was aged 19 when she met Malcolm Turnbull, who was aged 23.[20][21][22] Their first date was a dinner with Bob Carr and his wife Helena.[23] Hughes and Turnbull were married on 22 March 1980[24][25] in Cumnor, Oxfordshire, England, United Kingdom by a Church of England priest, despite Turnbull then being Presbyterian and Hughes Roman Catholic.[24] After two miscarriages, Lucy and Malcolm Turnbull had two children, Alex (b. 1982) and Daisy (b. 1985).[1] Malcolm Turnbull was a member of the House of Representatives for Wentworth between 2004 and 2018, representing the Liberal Party. He had two stints as the party's leader, and in that capacity, in his second term served as the 29th Prime Minister of Australia, in the Turnbull Government.[26]

During her husband's term as prime minister, the couple resided at The Lodge.[27] They own properties in Sydney, the Hunter Valley and an apartment in Canberra.[28][29] They also own an apartment in New York City.[29]

Published works

References

  1. ^ a b Hawkins, Belinda (3 August 2009). "Lucy Turnbull interview". Australian Story. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Archived from the original (transcript) on 29 September 2015. Retrieved 31 October 2010.
  2. ^ Lucy Turnbull: Malcolm's right-hand woman Archived 9 January 2016 at the Wayback Machine
  3. ^ https://www.afr.com/life-and-luxury/theres-something-about-lucy-20151008-gk3xq2[bare URL]
  4. ^ Wade, Kirsten. "Lucy Turnbull shares her vision of Sydney at Graduate Connections Breakfast". University of Sydney. Archived from the original on 30 December 2013.
  5. ^ "Western Sydney University recognises outstanding Australians with honorary awards in September". Western Sydney University. Archived from the original on 12 December 2017.
  6. ^ "Lucy Turnbull". Sydney's Aldermen. City of Sydney. Retrieved 17 June 2018.
  7. ^ "Lord Mayor Launches Broadside Against Forced Council Merger Plan" (Press release). City of Sydney. 27 January 2004. Archived from the original on 31 July 2017. Retrieved 31 July 2017.
  8. ^ "Turnbull, Lucy". Trove. National Library of Australia. 2014. Archived from the original on 31 July 2017. Retrieved 31 July 2017.
  9. ^ Davies, Anne (29 September 2015). "Prime Minister's wife Lucy Turnbull assessing board roles to ensure no conflicts of interest". The Sydney Morning Herald. Archived from the original on 1 August 2017. Retrieved 31 July 2017.
  10. ^ Turnbull, Lucy (8 March 2010). "UN must step up for the women of Burma". The Sydney Morning Herald. Archived from the original on 5 June 2010. Retrieved 31 October 2010.
  11. ^ "The Committee for Sydney | Board". www.sydney.org.au. Archived from the original on 8 May 2015. Retrieved 15 September 2015.
  12. ^ "Turnbull, Lucy Hughes". Search Australian Honours. Commonwealth of Australia. 26 January 2011. Archived from the original on 29 June 2011. Retrieved 26 January 2011.
  13. ^ "Honorary Doctorate for Lucy Turnbull". University of New South Wales. 31 May 2012. Retrieved 27 July 2018.
  14. ^ "Lucy Turnbull appointed Adjunct Professor at UNSW". UNSW Faculty of Built Environment. 21 October 2016. Retrieved 27 July 2018.
  15. ^ "Western Sydney University recognises outstanding Australians with honorary awards in September". Western Sydney University. 8 September 2017. Retrieved 27 July 2018.
  16. ^ Saulwick, Jacob (3 December 2015). "Lucy Turnbull to run Greater Sydney Commission". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 6 December 2017.
  17. ^ "Commissioners - Chief Commissioner - Lucy Hughes Turnbull AO". Greater Sydney Commission. Retrieved 17 June 2018.
  18. ^ Gorrey, Megan (24 March 2020). "Lucy Turnbull steps down from the Greater Sydney Commission". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 14 June 2020.
  19. ^ Morris, Linda (2 December 2020). "Lucy Turnbull named chair of Sydney Opera House". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 2 December 2020.
  20. ^ "First Speech". University of Sydney: Malcolm Turnbull MP. Archived from the original on 14 January 2014.
  21. ^ Hall, Eleanor (30 November 2004). "Malcolm Turnbull's maiden parliamentary speech". ABC. Archived from the original on 2 January 2014.
  22. ^ "The rise and rise of Malcolm Turnbull". The Sydney Morning Herald. Fairfax Media. 16 September 2008. Archived from the original on 12 July 2016.
  23. ^ Hewett, Jennifer (25 October 2008). "The opportunist". The Australian. Retrieved 27 July 2018.
  24. ^ a b Hawkins, Belinda (3 August 2009). "Malcolm Turnbull interview". Australian Story. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Archived from the original (transcript) on 11 August 2016.
  25. ^ "About Malcolm". Malcolm Turnbull – Member for Wentworth. Malcolm Turnbull – Federal Member for Wentworth. 2010. Archived from the original on 17 October 2010. Retrieved 31 October 2010.
  26. ^ "Malcolm Turnbull topples Tony Abbott in Liberal leadership ballot". ABC News. Australia. 14 September 2015. Archived from the original on 15 September 2015. Retrieved 14 September 2015.
  27. ^ Ireland, Judith (25 January 2016). "The Turnbulls take The Lodge". The Sydney Morning Herald. Archived from the original on 13 November 2016. Retrieved 25 March 2016.
  28. ^ "How Malcolm Turnbull invests". Australian Financial Review. 18 August 2015. Archived from the original on 18 September 2015. Retrieved 16 September 2015.
  29. ^ a b "Inside Malcolm Turnbull's Point Piper mansion". The Sydney Morning Herald. 15 September 2015. Archived from the original on 16 September 2015. Retrieved 16 September 2015.
Civic offices Preceded byHenry Tsang Deputy Lord Mayor of Sydney 1999–2003 Succeeded byDixie Coulton Preceded byFrank Sartor Lord Mayor of Sydney 2003–2004 Succeeded byClover Moore Preceded byHerselfas Lord Mayor of Sydney Commissioner of the City of Sydney 2004 Served alongside: Pooley, Payne Succeeded byClover Mooreas Lord Mayor of Sydney Preceded byWarren Polglaseas Mayor of Tweed Shire Administrator of Tweed Shire Council 2005 – 2007 Served alongside: Boyd, Payne/Willan Succeeded byGarry Payne Honorary titles Preceded byMargie Abbott Spouse of the Prime Minister of Australia 2015–2018 Succeeded byJenny Morrison Government offices New title Chief Commissioner of the Greater Sydney Commission 2015–2020 Succeeded byGeoff Roberts Preceded byNicholas Moore Chairperson of the Sydney Opera House Trust 2021–date Incumbent