Luis Silverio
Luis Silverio on June 12, 2012.jpg
Outfielder / Coach
Born: (1956-10-23) October 23, 1956 (age 65)
Villa González, Dominican Republic
Batted: Right
Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 9, 1978, for the Kansas City Royals
Last MLB appearance
September 30, 1978, for the Kansas City Royals
MLB statistics
Batting average.545
Home runs0
Runs batted in3
Teams
As player

As coach

Luis Pascual (Delmonte) Silverio (born October 23, 1956) is a Dominican former professional baseball player and coach, currently serving as the Senior Advisor to Latin American Operations for the Pittsburgh Pirates of Major League Baseball (MLB).[1] In 2011 and 2012, he was the first-base, outfield and baserunning coach for the Pirates' major league team.

Prior to joining the Pittsburgh organization, Silverio spent thirty-five years in the Kansas City Royals' organization, and was a coach at the Major League level for the Royals from 2003–2008.[2] Silverio has been associated with the Royals since he signed as a non-drafted free agent on November 12, 1973. Though he played in only eight games with the Royals in September 1978, he recorded six hits in his eleven career at bats. His .545 batting average is the highest in baseball history for any player who came to bat ten or more times in their career.[3] Silverio coached in the Royals minor league system from 1983 to 1989. He was the general manager of the Royals' Dominican League entry from 1990 to 1992, the coordinator of Latin American operations from 1993 to 1999, the coordinator of Dominican operation from 2000 to 2002, and player development coordinator in 2009–2010.[4] His daughter, Jennifer, is married to former Royals shortstop Ángel Berroa.

Silverio has two sons and two daughters and lives in Florida.

References

  1. ^ "Pirates Announce Jay Bell As New Hitting Coach". Pirates Prospects. October 31, 2012. Retrieved 19 April 2014.
  2. ^ "Bio at pirates.com".
  3. ^ "Luis Silverio Stats".
  4. ^ Kaegel, Dick (April 21, 2008). "Silverio reflects on path to big leagues Royals' long-serving third-base coach was once prospect". MLB. Retrieved 16 March 2010.