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MTV Global
MTV logo
Broadcast areaEurope
HeadquartersMain office
London (since 1987)
Broadcasting Center
Prague (since 2010)
Editorial office
Amsterdam (since 2020)
Programming
Language(s)English
Picture format1080i HDTV
(downscaled to 576i for the SD feed)
Ownership
OwnerParamount Networks EMEAA[1]
Sister channelsMTV 80s
MTV 90s
MTV 00s
MTV Live
MTV Hits
Club MTV
History
Launched1 August 1987; 35 years ago (1987-08-01)
FounderParamount Global
Robert Maxwell Group
British Telecom[2]
Former namesMTV Europe
Links
Websitemtve.com
mtv.tv
mtveurope.com

MTV Global (formerly as MTV Europe) is the international version of the American TV channel MTV, a 24—hour music and entertainment TV channel that began broadcasting on August 1, 1987 as part of the worldwide MTV network.

Over the years, MTV Global has been divided into many different channels for certain countries. Many countries in Europe and Asia now have their own versions of the channel, while MTV Global is available in European countries where there is no localized version of MTV.

History

On August 1, 1987, at 00:01 Western European time, MTV Europe began broadcasting with an Elton John concert in Amsterdam. The first video clip shown on the air was Money for Nothing by Dire Straits. Moreover, the beginning and end of the clip were supplemented with the slogan "I want my MTV", voiced by Sting[3]. MTV Europe was created in collaboration between Viacom, British Telecom and Robert Maxwell Group[4]. The office was located in London at 40 Conduit St[5][6].

The channel was launched in the UK, Denmark, Germany, Finland, the Netherlands and Sweden, a year later MTV Europe expanded to Germany, Belgium, Switzerland, Greece and Norway[3]. The channel was immediately accepted into 1.6 million households[3].

The original line-up of VJs included presenters from Belgium, Denmark and France, as well as Ray Cox and Steve Blame from the UK. Since that time, MTV has popularized such a profession as VJ[3].

At that time, such programs as MTV's Greatest Hits, Headbanger's Ball, MTV's Most Wanted, The Big Picture (a program about cinema), The Pulse (about fashion and style), 120 Minutes and MTV Coca Cola Report (music news, interviews and tour dates of musicians) were produced.

In February 1988, MTV Europe moved to the Camden Town area at 20-23 Mandela St[3][7].

In December of the same year, the management of MTV Europe visited the USSR for preliminary negotiations on the start of work[8].

In 1989, MTV Europe covered the Moscow Music Festival live from the Lenin Stadium. At the same time, the TV channel starts in East Berlin[3]. Soviet artists officially debuted on MTV in the summer of 1989. The Moscow group "Cruise" released the Hit for MTV manifesto song at the same time. In 1990, Viacom bought the remaining 25% of the shares from British Telecom[4].

In early 1991, Metromedia International Group together with Lencentel signed a contract with MTV Europe for 5 years, this is the first contract for broadcasting a foreign channel signed in the USSR. On March 8, 1991, the channel began broadcasting in Leningrad, and later in other major cities, which made it possible to become the first Western 24-hour channel that could be received in the USSR[9][10][11][12][13][14].

Nirvana led the rapid transition to the rise of alternative rock and grunge on MTV in 1991, releasing a video clip for the song "Smells Like Teen Spirit". In the early-mid-1990s, MTV added gangsta rappers with a less pop sound to its rotation, such as Tupac Shakur, The Notorious B.I.G., Wu-Tang Clan, Ice Cube, Warren G, Ice-T, Dr. Dre, Us and Snoop Dogg.

In August 1991, Viacom bought the remaining 50.1% of the shares from Robert Maxwell Group, because the London-based company was short of cash, and sold its assets as part of efforts to reduce debts accumulated during aggressive acquisitions in the 1980s[4].

By 1992, MTV Networks Europe had become the largest pan-European broadcasting company[3]. MTV Europe was hosted by 38 million households in 28 countries[15].

In 1993, MTV Europe moved to the Breakfast Television Center at 17-29 Hawley Crescent, and a temporary additional office appeared at 180 Oxford Street[16][17].

From 1990 to 1996, MTV programs were rebroadcast on the central TV channels of Russia – "VID", "ORT", "2x2", "TV-6", "Muz-TV" and others. Also from 1992 to 1994 on the Polish TV channel TVP1.

The channel launched the premieres of the following programs: Beavis and Butthead, Æon Flux, The Brothers Grunt, etc.

In 1994, the channel began holding the MTV Europe Music Awards ceremony. Every year the ceremony takes place in one of the major European cities. On July 1, 1995, MTV Europe switched to pay TV broadcasting, and was also one of the first channels in Europe to start digital broadcasting[3].

In September, the channel was fined by the Independent Commission on Television Programs of Great Britain for a total of 60,000 pounds for showing obscenities, scenes of sadomasochism and similar things at a time of day when children could still be at the TV[18]. In November of the same year, MTV Europe was hosted by 51.3 million households in 36 countries[19]. At the end of 1995, Chello Zone became the distributor of the channel in Russia[20][21]

In 1996-1997, two websites were launched – mtve.com and mtveurope.com [22][23].

Starting from the end of 1997, MTV gradually reduced the screening of video clips of rock music representatives, which led to the slogan among skeptics: "Rock is dead." The fact that at that time rock music fans were less materialistic and bought less music based on TV offers were cited as the reasons that the channel was breaking away from its once mainstream music. Instead, MTV began to devote its musical airtime mainly to pop and hip-hop/R&B music. All rock shows were eliminated, and the rock-related categories at the Video Music Awards were reduced to one.

At the dawn of the new millennium, in the period from 1997 to 2001, the animated series Daria in the genre of comedy drama, everyday life was released on the MTV channel.

MTV Networks Europe has rapidly begun to open local divisions of the MTV channel in some countries. So in March 1997, MTV Germany was launched. MTV UK & Ireland opened on July 1, then MTV Italy was launched in September. MTV Nordic for Scandinavia was launched in June 1998, MTV Russia appeared on September 25[24]. In 2000, other regional channels were launched – MTV France in June, followed by MTV Poland in July and MTV Spain and MTV Nederland in September[25]. MTV Networks Europe continued to open local branches in other European countries. In the same year, another website appeared – mtv.tv[26]

On April 1, 2002, the channel was legally renamed MTV European. At the same time, the channel began to abandon some of its programs in favor of American MTV shows. The channel significantly reduced the overall rotation of music videos during the first decade of the 2000s. Similar trends were observed on other European MTV channels.

In 2004 and 2008, MTV continued to focus on reality shows, releasing projects 8th & Ocean, Laguna Beach, Next, The Hills, Two-A-Days, My Super Sweet 16, Parental Control and Viva la Bam featuring Bam Margera.

In 2007, MTV broadcast the reality show "A Shot at Love with Tila Tequila", which told about the sensational journey of Tila Tequila in search of her sex partner. Her bisexuality played a role in the concept of the show: both men and women competed for love.

In 2006-2007, MTV Turkey and MTV Ukraine were launched. In August 2007, the editorial department moved to Warsaw, but broadcasting continued from the London office. MTV European also expanded to South Africa and the Middle East[27].

On July 1, 2009, during the unified standardization of the design of the global MTV network, a new corporate identity was introduced, as well as a new design[28].

Since January 2010, MTV Networks Europe has started rebranding localized websites, creating standards for each country. In August, music programs disappeared from the air, and reality shows from the American branch of MTV began to be shown instead[29][30].

The broadcasting center moved to Prague from London, but the editorial department remained in Warsaw[31]. MTV European began to focus on viewers from 16 to 35 years old, the audience was more than 100 million people in 43 countries.

On July 1, 2011, the logo and design of the channel changed, the inscription "Music Television" disappeared from the logo[32]. The former name MTV Europe has also returned.

In August 2012, all music charts disappeared from the channel[33]. At the beginning of 2013, three charts returned to the air of MTV Europe — Hitlist UK, Base Chart and Dance Floor Chart[34]. At the same time, the channel covered 101 countries[35].

In the fall of 2014, the channel's website was transferred to the organizers of the MTV Europe Music Awards, now when switching to the website mtv.tv , redirects to the site tv.mtvema.com.

In the summer of 2015, MTV Europe reissued the inter-program screensavers of TV channels, focusing on the initiative MTVBump.com , and provided more social screensavers created by MTV viewers[36][37][38][39][40][41].

On March 1 , 2016 , MTV Europe switched to widescreen broadcasting (16:9)[42][43].

In December 2017, MTV received a new design, similar to Latin American and Brazilian MTV. Other local MTV channels across Europe have also started using similar on-air branding.

Since June 2019, all music videos are broadcast only until 8:00 Central European time, with the exception of the Euro Top chart on Friday from 9 to 11:00.

In 2020, the editorial department moved from Warsaw to Amsterdam, but London is engaged in licensing and controlling the channel[44][45].

Since January 26, 2021, the channel "MTV Europe" has been renamed "MTV Global", now the channel is accepted in 111 countries of the world[46]. On September 14 of the same year, a rebranding was carried out, which included an updated version of the logo and a new design[47].

Distribution

As of 2021, MTV Global broadcasts in the following territories:[1]

Free-to-air satellite transmissions

MTV Germany was available FTA on Astra 19,2E, but it became encrypted on 1 January 2011. Until August 2015 the Italian MTV-station was free to air available on Eutelsat 12 West A. However, with the take-over of Sky Italia of this channel, it has been rebranded TV8. MTV Italia has become an exclusive Sky-channel only for subscribers. On 23 December 2017, MTV Germany turned itself into a free-to-air channel.

Programming

Current Local Music Shows

Former Local Shows

Award Shows and Live Music Specials

Pan-International

Former shows

Past VJs

See also

References

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