Mason County
The Mason County courthouse in Maysville
The Mason County courthouse in Maysville
Map of Kentucky highlighting Mason County
Location within the U.S. state of Kentucky
Map of the United States highlighting Kentucky
Kentucky's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 38°36′N 83°50′W / 38.6°N 83.83°W / 38.6; -83.83
Country United States
State Kentucky
Founded1788
Named forGeorge Mason
SeatMaysville
Largest cityMaysville
Area
 • Total246 sq mi (640 km2)
 • Land240 sq mi (600 km2)
 • Water6.3 sq mi (16 km2)  2.6%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total17,120 Decrease
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional district4th
Websitemasoncountykentucky.us

Mason County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. Its county seat is Maysville.[1] The county was created from Bourbon County, Virginia in 1788 and named for George Mason, a Virginia delegate to the U.S. Constitutional Convention, known as the "Father of the Bill of Rights".[2][3] Mason County comprises the Maysville, KY Micropolitan Statistical Area, which is included in the Cincinnati-Wilmington-Maysville, OH-KY-IN Combined Statistical Area.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 246 square miles (640 km2), of which 240 square miles (620 km2) is land and 6.3 square miles (16 km2) (2.6%) is water.[4] The county's northern border with Ohio is formed by the Ohio River.

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
17902,729
180012,182346.4%
181012,4592.3%
182013,5889.1%
183016,19919.2%
184015,719−3.0%
185018,34416.7%
186018,222−0.7%
187018,126−0.5%
188020,46912.9%
189020,7731.5%
190020,446−1.6%
191018,611−9.0%
192017,760−4.6%
193018,8626.2%
194019,0661.1%
195018,486−3.0%
196018,454−0.2%
197017,273−6.4%
198017,7652.8%
199016,666−6.2%
200016,8000.8%
201017,4904.1%
202017,120−2.1%
2021 (est.)16,931−1.1%
U.S. Decennial Census[5]
1790-1960[6] 1900-1990[7]
1990-2000[8] 2010-2021[9]

As of the census[10] of 2000, there were 16,800 people, 6,847 households, and 4,697 families residing in the county. The population density was 70 per square mile (27/km2). There were 7,754 housing units at an average density of 32 per square mile (12/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 90.88% White, 7.16% Black or African American, 0.15% Native American, 0.37% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.57% from other races, and 0.85% from two or more races. 0.95% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 6,847 households, out of which 31.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.20% were married couples living together, 11.10% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.40% were non-families. 27.60% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.80% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.41 and the average family size was 2.92.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 24.10% under the age of 18, 8.00% from 18 to 24, 28.50% from 25 to 44, 23.90% from 45 to 64, and 15.50% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 93.70 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.50 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $30,195, and the median income for a family was $37,257. Males had a median income of $30,718 versus $21,216 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,589. About 12.90% of families and 16.80% of the population were below the poverty line, including 23.60% of those under age 18 and 13.70% of those age 65 or over.

Communities

Cities

Census-designated place

Other unincorporated places

Politics

Mason County was at the time of the Civil War the easternmost of the strongly secessionist Bluegrass bloc.[11] Mason was in fact the most easterly Kentucky county to be represented at the Russellville Convention of 1861 to discuss the secession of Kentucky from the Union.

Mason County's secessionist sentiment meant that it voted Democratic consistently up until the 1950s, with the exception of the 1928 election when strong local anti-Catholic sentiment against Al Smith allowed Herbert Hoover to carry the county. Since 1996 the county has shifted more strongly Republican in US presidential elections.

United States presidential election results for Mason County, Kentucky[12]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 5,477 68.82% 2,362 29.68% 119 1.50%
2016 4,944 68.49% 1,970 27.29% 305 4.22%
2012 4,197 60.99% 2,592 37.67% 92 1.34%
2008 4,102 57.60% 2,891 40.60% 128 1.80%
2004 4,381 61.89% 2,644 37.35% 54 0.76%
2000 3,572 60.82% 2,178 37.08% 123 2.09%
1996 2,588 46.72% 2,444 44.12% 507 9.15%
1992 2,432 40.34% 2,657 44.07% 940 15.59%
1988 3,158 53.57% 2,721 46.16% 16 0.27%
1984 3,751 58.19% 2,663 41.31% 32 0.50%
1980 2,926 46.54% 3,181 50.60% 180 2.86%
1976 2,529 42.12% 3,397 56.58% 78 1.30%
1972 3,529 58.46% 2,459 40.73% 49 0.81%
1968 2,661 40.50% 2,772 42.19% 1,137 17.31%
1964 2,437 35.05% 4,502 64.76% 13 0.19%
1960 4,334 57.89% 3,153 42.11% 0 0.00%
1956 3,880 51.80% 3,572 47.69% 38 0.51%
1952 3,606 49.89% 3,614 50.00% 8 0.11%
1948 2,519 40.13% 3,620 57.67% 138 2.20%
1944 3,256 45.83% 3,810 53.62% 39 0.55%
1940 3,704 45.63% 4,386 54.03% 27 0.33%
1936 3,317 41.63% 4,503 56.52% 147 1.85%
1932 3,213 38.55% 5,065 60.78% 56 0.67%
1928 5,012 59.79% 3,364 40.13% 6 0.07%
1924 3,406 48.28% 3,525 49.96% 124 1.76%
1920 3,743 44.16% 4,691 55.34% 42 0.50%
1916 2,127 42.54% 2,820 56.40% 53 1.06%
1912 1,558 33.83% 2,475 53.75% 572 12.42%


Education

Mason County Schools operates public schools.

Schools:

In 1990 the Maysville Independent School District merged into the Mason County school district.[13]

Notable residents

See also

References

  1. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  2. ^ "Mason County". The Kentucky Encyclopedia. 2000. Retrieved August 23, 2014.
  3. ^ Collins, Lewis (1882). Collins' Historical Sketches of Kentucky: History of Kentucky, Volume 2. Collins & Company. p. 26.
  4. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on August 12, 2014. Retrieved August 17, 2014.
  5. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 17, 2014.
  6. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved August 17, 2014.
  7. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 17, 2014.
  8. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 17, 2014.
  9. ^ "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 7, 2011. Retrieved March 6, 2014.
  10. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  11. ^ Copeland, James E.; 'Where Were the Kentucky Unionists and Secessionists'; The Register of the Kentucky Historical Society, volume 71, no. 4 (October, 1973), pp. 344-363
  12. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved July 4, 2018.
  13. ^ Ellis, Ronnie (January 15, 2007). "The ups and downs of merging school districts". Richmond Register. Retrieved May 21, 2018.

Coordinates: 38°36′N 83°50′W / 38.60°N 83.83°W / 38.60; -83.83