Justice
Mathilda Twomey
Mathilda Twomey portrait.jpg
7th Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Seychelles
In office
18 August 2015 (2015-08-18) – September 2020 (2020-09)
Appointed byConstitutional Appointments Authority of Seychelles
PresidentJames Michel
Preceded byFrederick Egonda-Ntende
Succeeded byRony Goviden
Personal details
Born
Mathilda Butler-Payette[1]

Mahé, Seychelles
SpouseBrian Twomey
Children4
Alma mater
ProfessionLawyer

Mathilda Twomey (née Butler-Payette)[2] is a Seychellois lawyer and academic.[3] She is the first female judge in the history of Seychelles and also the first woman to be appointed Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Seychelles.[4][5]

Early life and education

Twomey was born in Mahé, Seychelles.[6] She holds a degree in French law from the University of Paris-Sud, France;[7] and also a Bachelors of Arts degree in English and French Law which she obtained from the University of Kent, Canterbury, U.K.[6] She was admitted as a Member of the Bar at Middle Temple, London and as an attorney-at-law in Seychelles in 1987. She holds a master's degree programme in Public Law from the National University of Ireland; and in 2015, she completed her Ph.D from the same institution.[8]

Career

In 1987, Twomey started her career as a legal practitioner by first serving as a barrister in the Ocean Gate Law Centre. She has also worked in the Attorney General’s Chambers and as an attorney-at-law in private chambers. She was one of the selected members of the Constitutional Commission who were instrumental in drafting the Constitution of the Third Republic between 1992-1993.[4][9] In 1996, she also worked as regional coordinator for Multiple Sclerosis Ireland, upon moving to Ireland in 1995.[10]

On 13 April 2011, she became the first female judge in Seychelles after she was sworn in as a non-resident judge;[10] and on 18 August 2015, she also became the first woman to be appointed Chief Judge of the Supreme Court of Seychelles after she was sworn in at the State House, Victoria, succeeding Frederick Egonda-Ntende.[11][12] Her mandate as Chief Justice ended in September 2020.[13]

Published books

See also

References

  1. ^ "Mathilda Twomey becomes country's first female judge". Seychelles-eNews. Retrieved 4 August 2016.
  2. ^ "JUSTICE MATHILDA TWOMEY SWORN INTO OFFICE". Seychelles Government. 12 April 2011. Retrieved 6 August 2016.
  3. ^ "Interview with Chief Justice Mathilda Twomey". Seychelles Ministry of Tourism and Culture. 19 August 2015. Retrieved 4 August 2016.
  4. ^ a b Uranie, Sharon (7 August 2015). "First woman Chief Justice appointed in Seychelles". Seychelles News Agency. Retrieved 4 August 2016.
  5. ^ "President of the Seychelles Appoints Mathilda Twomey as the First Female Judge". Seychelles Legal Information Institute. Retrieved 4 August 2016.
  6. ^ a b "Chief Justice Mathilda Twomey". NUI Galway. Archived from the original on 13 September 2016. Retrieved 4 August 2016.
  7. ^ Charles O'Mahony (22 March 2011). "PRESIDENT OF THE SEYCHELLS APPOINTS MATHILDA TWOMEY AS THE FIRST FEMALE JUDGE". Human Rights in Ireland. Retrieved 6 August 2016.
  8. ^ "Seychelles: Justice Mathilda Twomey Appointed Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Seychelles". Government of Seychelles. 7 August 2016. Retrieved 4 August 2016.
  9. ^ "Seychelles gets first female judge". seychelles.hu. 13 April 2011. Retrieved 4 August 2016.
  10. ^ a b "Justice Mathilda Twomey Sworn Into Office". Seychelles State House. 13 April 2011. Retrieved 4 August 2016.
  11. ^ Corless, Nicholas. "Kinvara woman new Chief Justice in Seychelles". The Clare Champion. Retrieved 4 August 2016.
  12. ^ Vannier, Rassin; Ponzo, Celia; Amla, Hajira (18 August 2015). ""I will make my judgements impartially", says Seychelles new Supreme Court Chief Justice Mathilda Twomey". Seychelles News Agency. Retrieved 4 August 2016.
  13. ^ Bonnelame, Betymie (9 November 2020). "Seychelles' new Chief Justice sworn in, pledges, vows to keep justice at forefront". Seychelles News Agency.
  14. ^ "Dr Mathilda Twomey dedicates book to daughter, her 'little light' - Ministry of Youth Sports & Culture". www.pfsr.org. Retrieved 15 September 2017.