Matt White
Personal information
Full nameMatthew Edward White
NationalityAmerican
Born (1978-08-13) August 13, 1978 (age 43)
Years active1996–2006
Height6 ft 5 in (196 cm)
Weight237 lb (108 kg; 16 st 13 lb)
Sport
SportBaseball
PositionPitcher
Turned pro1996

Matthew Edward White (born August 13, 1978) is a retired professional baseball pitcher. He attended Waynesboro Area High School from 1993 to 1996[1] where he had a 0.79 ERA.[2] During his senior year he posted a 10–1 record with an 0.63 ERA, allowing 21 hits and 37 baserunners.[3] Following the season he was named USA Today's Baseball Player of the Year[4] and the Gatorade's High School Player of the Year.[5][6][7]

After initially planning to attend Georgia Tech University,[8] White was drafted by the San Francisco Giants in the 1996 amateur draft,[9] but his agent Scott Boras found a loophole that allowed White to become a free agent after the Giants failed to offer him a contract in the required 10-day time allotted.[2] He received a $10.2 million signing bonus in 1996 with the Tampa Bay Devil Rays.[10][11] Shoulder and back injuries limited White to 122 minor league games during his career. He never played in the major leagues and retired in 2006 with a career mark of 35–47 and a 4.64 earned run average.[8][12][13][14]

White competed in the trials for the 1996 Olympics team but was the last high school pitcher cut from the team.[15] He was selected to the 2000 Sydney Olympic team but suffered an injury prior to the games and was forced to return without participating.[8]

References

  1. ^ Eric Reed (16 August 1997). "Period of adjustment". Public Opinion. pp. 1B, 6A. Retrieved 26 April 2022 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  2. ^ a b John Steadman (5 January 1997). "One of baseball's youngest stars keeping his feet on the ground". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved 26 April 2022.
  3. ^ Parry Shaw (26 November 1996). "Devil Rays turn opponents White with envy". The Bradenton Herald. pp. 1, 3. Retrieved 26 April 2022 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  4. ^ Mike DiGiovanna (26 November 1996). "Prep Pitcher Nets $10.2 Million". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 26 April 2022.
  5. ^ Bill Chastain (26 December 1996). "One in a million for Rays". The Tampa Tribune. p. 1. Retrieved 26 April 2022 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  6. ^ Bill Chastain (26 December 1996). "White / Devil Rays banking on small-town hero". The Tampa Tribune. p. 8. Retrieved 26 April 2022 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  7. ^ Rod Shetler (23 July 1996). "Matt White lone veteran trials player". Joplin Globe. pp. 4B–5B. Retrieved 26 April 2022 – via Newspaperarchive.com. open access
  8. ^ a b c Jeff Arnold (1 July 2010). "New Michigan pitching coach Matt White brings wealth of experience and perspective to Wolverines". The Ann Arbor News. Retrieved 26 April 2022.
  9. ^ Eric Reed (5 June 1996). "Matt White takes a Giant step". Public Opinion. pp. 1A, 12A. Retrieved 26 April 2022 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  10. ^ Kevin Wells (26 February 1998). "Wild to wow". The Tampa Tribune. pp. 1, 6. Retrieved 26 April 2022 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  11. ^ Rodney Page (10 June 1998). "Matt White feels at home". Tampa Bay Times. Retrieved 26 April 2022.
  12. ^ Roger Mooney (25 June 2006). "I want to get to the 'Big Leagues'". The Bradenton Herald. pp. 1D, 7D. Retrieved 26 April 2022 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  13. ^ John Romano (26 July 2006). "Arm, not heart, failed bonus baby". Tampa Bay Times. pp. 1C, 3C. Retrieved 26 April 2022 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  14. ^ Bill Chastain; Jesse Rogers; Ben Zobrist (2018). Try not to suck : the exceptional, extraordinary baseball life of Joe Maddon. Chicago, Illinois: Triumph Books. ISBN 9781633198579. Retrieved 26 April 2022.
  15. ^ "Devil Rays put White in the black". The News Journal. 26 November 1996. p. C2. Retrieved 26 April 2022 – via Newspapers.com. open access