Martino in 2019

Mauro Martino is an Italian artist, designer and researcher.[1] He is the founder and director of the Visual Artificial Intelligence Lab at IBM Research, and Professor of Practice at Northeastern University.[2]

Career

He graduated from Polytechnic University of Milan, and was a research affiliate with the Senseable City Lab at MIT. Mauro was formerly an Assistant Research Professor at Northeastern University working with Albert-Laszlo Barabasi at Center for Complex Network Research and with David Lazer and Fellows at The Institute for Quantitative Social Science (IQSS) at Harvard University.[3]

Mauro Martino in 2018

His works have been published in "The Best American Infographics" in the 2015[4] and 2016 editions[5] and have been shown at international festivals and exhibitions including Ars Electronica,[6] RIXC Art Science Festival,[7] Global Exchange at Lincoln Center,[8] TEDx Cambridge THRIVE, TEDx Riga,[9] and the Serpentine Gallery.[10] His work is in the permanent collection at Ars Electronica Center.[11] In 2017, Martino and his team received the National Science Foundation's award for Best Scientific Video for the project Network Earth.[12] In 2019, Martino and Luca Stornaiuolo won the 2019 Webby People's Voice Award in the category NetArt for the project AI Portraits.[13]

The project 150 Years of Nature won multiple awards such as Fast Company - Innovation by Design Awards Best Data Design 2020,[14] Webby Award 2020, Webby People's Voice Award 2020.[15] This project, along with other works created in collaboration with Barabási Lab (e.g., Wonder Net, A Century of Physics, Data Sculpture in Bronze, Control, Resilience, Success in Science, Fake News), was shown at the "Barabási Lab. Hidden Patterns" exhibitions at ZKM Center for Art and Media[16] and Ludwig Museum - Museum of Contemporary Art, Budapest.[17]

Mauro Martino is a pioneer in the use of the artificial neural network in sculpture.[18][19]

Notable works

Awards

References

  1. ^ "Mauro Martino. About". Retrieved 18 March 2019.
  2. ^ "Northeastern University, CAMD Art&Design". Retrieved 17 March 2019.
  3. ^ Martino, Mauro. "Mauro Martino". Mauro Martino Lab. Retrieved 2020-11-15.
  4. ^ a b Cook, Gareth (2015). The Best American Infographics 2015. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. pp. 150–151. ISBN 978-0544542709.
  5. ^ a b Cook, Gareth (2016). The Best American Infographics 2016. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. pp. 36–37. ISBN 978-0544556386.
  6. ^ "Ars Electronica 2011. Sensing Place / Placing Sense – Symposium". Retrieved 18 March 2019.
  7. ^ "OPEN FIELDS. RIXC Art Science Festival 2016 Exhibition". Retrieved 18 March 2019.
  8. ^ "Lincoln Center Global Exchange 2015". Retrieved 18 March 2019.
  9. ^ "TEDxRiga. Mauro Martino". Retrieved 18 March 2019.
  10. ^ "Edge-Serpentine Gallery-MAPS FOR THE 21ST CENTURY". Retrieved 18 March 2019.
  11. ^ "Ars Electronica. Understanding AI". Retrieved June 20, 2019.
  12. ^ a b "Vizzies Visualization Challenge". Retrieved 17 March 2019.
  13. ^ a b "Webby People's Voice Award 2019 - NetArt". Retrieved June 20, 2019.
  14. ^ a b c "Innovation by Design Awards - Best Data Design". Retrieved September 21, 2021.
  15. ^ a b c "The Webby Awards. 150 years of Nature". Retrieved September 21, 2021.
  16. ^ a b "ZKM. BarabásiLab. Hidden Patterns". Retrieved September 23, 2021.
  17. ^ a b "Ludwig Museum. BARABÁSILAB: HIDDEN PATTERNS. THE LANGUAGE OF NETWORK THINKING". Retrieved September 23, 2021.
  18. ^ "NeurIPS Workshop on Machine Learning for Creativity and Design". 10 December 2018. Retrieved 17 March 2019.
  19. ^ "Fuorisalone.it Magazine. People". Retrieved 31 March 2019.
  20. ^ "Fast Company: These locations may look eerily familiar, but none actually exist". Retrieved September 21, 2021.
  21. ^ a b "Interni. Strolling Cities: AI, with poetry". 9 June 2021. Retrieved September 21, 2021.
  22. ^ "Mashable.com: 2 million real-life photos were turned into AI cities...but the cities don't exist". Mashable. 4 June 2021. Retrieved September 22, 2021.
  23. ^ a b c d "Strolling Cities". Retrieved September 22, 2021.
  24. ^ "Nature.com. 150 Years of Nature". Retrieved September 22, 2021.
  25. ^ "AI Portraits". Retrieved 18 March 2019.
  26. ^ "Mashable.com. AI Portraits uses code to turn you into a celebrity". Mashable. 15 November 2018. Retrieved 18 March 2019.
  27. ^ "WonderNet". Retrieved 18 March 2019.
  28. ^ "Center for Complex Network Research (CCNR)". Retrieved 17 March 2019.
  29. ^ "IEEE VIS 2018 Arts Program". Retrieved 18 March 2019.
  30. ^ "Forma Fluens". Retrieved 18 March 2019.
  31. ^ "Flowing Data. Looking for cultural expression in 50 million doodles". 16 June 2017. Retrieved 17 March 2019.
  32. ^ "123 DATA". Retrieved 17 March 2019.
  33. ^ "Flowing Data. Cultural history via where notable people died". 4 August 2014. Retrieved 17 March 2019.
  34. ^ Abbott, Alison (31 July 2014). "Nature.com. Humanity's cultural history captured in 5-minute film". Nature. doi:10.1038/nature.2014.15650. S2CID 163277505. Retrieved 17 March 2019.
  35. ^ "Places & Spaces: Mapping Science". Retrieved 17 March 2019.
  36. ^ "Visual Complexity. Watson News Explorer". Retrieved 18 March 2019.
  37. ^ "Fast Company. We're Pushing Nature's Network Architecture To A Catastrophic Crash". Retrieved 18 March 2019.
  38. ^ "Nature. Universal resilience patterns in complex networks". Retrieved 18 March 2019.
  39. ^ "The Washington Post. A stunning visualization of our divided Congress". The Washington Post. Retrieved 18 March 2019.
  40. ^ "Business Insider. This 60-second animation shows how divided Congress has become over the last 60 years". Business Insider. Retrieved 18 March 2019.
  41. ^ "Senseable City Lab MIT". Retrieved 18 March 2019.
  42. ^ "Kantar Information is Beautiful awards 2017". Retrieved 17 March 2019.
  43. ^ "Fast Company. Watson News Explorer". Retrieved 17 March 2019.
  44. ^ "Kantar Information is Beautiful awards 2016". Retrieved 17 March 2019.
  45. ^ "Information is Beautiful awards 2015". Retrieved 17 March 2019.
  46. ^ "Information is Beautiful award 2015". Retrieved 17 March 2019.