Methylatropine
Methylatropine.png
Clinical data
ATC code
Identifiers
  • (1R,5R)-3-[(3-hydroxy-2-phenylpropanoyl)oxy]-8,8-dimethyl-8-azoniabicyclo[3.2.1]octane
CAS Number
PubChem CID
DrugBank
ChemSpider
UNII
ChEMBL
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC18H26NO3
Molar mass304.410 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)
  • C[N+]1(C2CCC1CC(C2)OC(=O)C(CO)C3=CC=CC=C3)C
  • InChI=1S/C18H26NO3/c1-19(2)14-8-9-15(19)11-16(10-14)22-18(21)17(12-20)13-6-4-3-5-7-13/h3-7,14-17,20H,8-12H2,1-2H3/q+1/t14-,15+,16?,17-/m0/s1
  • Key:PIPAJLPNWZMYQA-WFVVYAPDSA-N
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Methylatropine (trade name Eumydrin) is a belladonna derivative.

In 1902, the Bayer Company introduced methylatropine, a quaternary ammonium salt of atropine, as a mydriatic for dilation of the pupil during ophthalmic examination under the brand name of Eumydrin. Because of its highly polar nature it penetrated less readily into the central nervous system than did atropine; hence it was introduced for relieving pyloric spasm in infants.[1]

The blocking potency of methylatropine is approximately 10-20 times higher than that of atropine at neuromuscular and ganglionic synapses.[2]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Methylatropine Bromide". Inxight: Drugs. National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), National Institutes of Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
  2. ^ Gyermek L (1998). "Semisynthetic Derivatives of Tropane Alkaloids and of other Tropane Esters". Pharmacology of Antimuscarinic Agents. Boca Raton: CRC Press. p. 162. ISBN 978-0-8493-8559-9.


Public Domain This article incorporates public domain material from the National Institutes of Health document: "Methylatropine Bromide".