Michelle Heyman
Heyman playing for Australia at the 2016 Rio Olympics
Personal information
Full name Michelle Pearl Heyman
Date of birth (1988-07-04) 4 July 1988 (age 33)
Place of birth Shellharbour, New South Wales, Australia
Height 180 cm (5 ft 11 in)[1]
Position(s) Striker
Club information
Current team
Canberra United
Number 23
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
2008 Illawarra Stingrays
2008–2009 Sydney FC 3 (0)
2009 Central Coast Mariners 11 (11)
2010–2018 Canberra United 93 (56)
2012 Brøndby IF
2015 Western New York Flash 9 (1)
2016–2018 Illawarra Stingrays 11 (5)
2018–2019 Adelaide United 12 (1)
2020– Canberra United 11 (10)
National team
2010–2018 Australia 61 (20)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 12 November 2018
‡ National team caps and goals correct as of 10 November 2018

Michelle Pearl Heyman (born 4 July 1988) is an Australian soccer player and commentator who currently plays for Canberra United in the W-League in Australia. She has previously played for W-League teams Central Coast Mariners, Sydney FC, and Adelaide United as well as the Western New York Flash in the American National Women's Soccer League. Heyman has represented Australia since 2010, playing at the 2014 AFC Women's Asian Cup, the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup and the 2016 Summer Olympics. In May 2019 she retired from international football.

Club career

Heyman playing for Canberra United in 2010
Heyman playing for Canberra United in 2010

Heyman began playing at the age of 11 with the Warilla Wanderers.[2] She later played for Port Kembla FC and Shellharbour City before signing with Illawarra Stingrays in the New South Wales Women's Super League (now NPL NSW Women's). She has returned to play for the Stingrays several times between W-League seasons.[3][4]

Prior to the beginning of the 2008–09 W-League season, Heyman trialled for Sydney FC. Out of 120 triallists, she was one of only ten to be signed by the club.[2]

Heyman signed from Sydney FC in the off-season to join Central Coast Mariners.[5] On her debut for the Mariners, Heyman scored a double against her old club, Sydney FC.[6]

In 2009, Heyman won the Golden Boot award for most goals scored during the League season along with the Julie Dolan Medal as the 2009 W-League player of the year.[7][8]

In 2010, Heyman signed with Canberra United.[9] During the 2011–12 W-League season, she was the leading goal-scorer in the league as Canberra United won the W-League premiership/championship double.[10]

Heyman spent five months in 2012 playing in Denmark for Brøndby IF. She returned to Canberra United in time for the start of the 2012–13 W-League season.[11]

On 9 July 2015, Heyman signed with US side Western New York Flash where she played nine matches in the 2015 National Women's Soccer League season.[12]

In 2016, rejoined the Illawarra Stingrays in the NPL NSW Women's competition during the W-League off-season.[13][14]

On 21 July 2018 it was announced that Heyman was leaving Canberra United after eight seasons. She made 93 appearances for Canberra, and scored 56 goals. She won the Golden Boot twice, and won two Championship Titles and three Premierships.[15]

On 24 August 2018 Adelaide United announced they had signed Heyman to a one-year contract for the 2018–19 W-League Season.[16] At the end of the season, Heyman left Adelaide.[17] After a season not playing soccer, Heyman returned to the W-League, signing with Canberra United.[18]

International career

Heyman made her debut for the national team in 2010.[19] She was part of the 2014 AFC Women's Asian Cup squad that finished the tournament as runners-up.[20] Heyman played five matches for Australia at the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup.[1][21] At the 2016 Summer Olympics, Heyman played four matches for the Australian team that was eliminated in the quarter finals.[22]

Heyman was named to the Matildas squad for the 2018 AFC Women's Asian Cup, but she did not appear in any matches. Australia finished Runner-up to Japan and qualified for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup.[23] In May 2019 she announced her retirement from international football.[24]

Career statistics

International goals

Scores and results list Australia's score first.

# Date Venue Opponent Score Result Competition
1 3 September 2011 Jinan Olympic Sports Center Stadium, Jinan, China  Thailand 2–0 5–1 2012 Olympics qualification
2 3–0
3 13 September 2012 Carroll Stadium, Indianapolis, United States  Haiti 4–0 4–0 Friendly
4 13 June 2013 Australian Institute of Sport, Canberra, Australia  New Zealand 1–0 1–0 Friendly
5 5 March 2014 GSZ Stadium, Larnaca, Cyprus  Netherlands 2–2 2–2 2014 Cyprus Cup
6 10 March 2014 GSZ Stadium, Larnaca, Cyprus  Scotland 1–3 2–4 2014 Cyprus Cup
7 2–4
8 9 April 2014 Queensland Sport and Athletics Centre, Brisbane, Australia  Brazil 2–1 2–1 Friendly
9 10 February 2015 Bill McKinlay Park, Auckland, New Zealand  North Korea 2–1 2–1 Friendly
10 12 February 2015 Bill McKinlay Park, Auckland, New Zealand  New Zealand 2–0 3–2 Friendly
11 11 March 2015 Paralimni Stadium, Paralimni, Cyprus  Czech Republic 4–1 6–2 2015 Cyprus Cup
12 19 May 2015 Valentine Sports Park, Sydney, Australia  Vietnam 4–0 4–0 Friendly
13 21 May 2015 Jubilee Oval, Sydney, Australia  Vietnam 2–0 11–0 Friendly
14 6–0
15 8–0
16 29 February 2016 Kincho Stadium, Osaka, Japan  Japan 2–0 3–1 2016 Olympics qualifying
17 2 March 2016 Nagai Stadium, Osaka, Japan  Vietnam 8–0 9–0 2016 Olympics qualifying
18 7 March 2016 Nagai Stadium, Osaka, Japan  North Korea 1–0 2–1 2016 Olympics qualifying
19 9 August 2016 Itaipava Arena Fonte Nova, Salvador, Brazil  Zimbabwe 5–0 6–1 2016 Summer Olympics
20 6–0

Honours

International

Australia

Rio Summer Olympics 2016

Club

Canberra United

Individual

Personal life

Heyman is openly lesbian.[26][27] She was the only openly gay Australian athlete at the 2016 Olympics.[28]

References

  1. ^ a b "FIFA Women's World Cup Canada 2015™ - List of Players - Australia" (PDF). FIFAdata.com. Retrieved 11 August 2017.
  2. ^ a b Ritchie, Joel (8 October 2008). "Heyman ready to strike for Sydney FC". Illawarra Mercury. Fairfax Regional Media. Archived from the original on 11 August 2017. Retrieved 11 August 2017.
  3. ^ Anderson, Ross. "Player Interview with Illawarra Stingrays' Michelle Heyman". Football NSW. Retrieved 12 August 2017.
  4. ^ Cohen, Mitch (28 July 2017). "Heyman to return for Illawarra". Illawarra Mercury. Fairfax Regional Media. Retrieved 12 August 2017.
  5. ^ Barrow, Tim (29 October 2009). "Heyman focusing on W-League goals". Illawarra Mercury. Fairfax Regional Media. Archived from the original on 11 August 2017. Retrieved 11 August 2017.
  6. ^ Carlucci, Joseph (5 October 2009). "Marvellous Mariners Women win season opener". Central Coast Mariners. Archived from the original on 17 February 2011.
  7. ^ Lucius, Adam (7 December 2009). "Late start no hurdle for Heyman". W-League.com.au. Sportal. Archived from the original on 19 February 2011. Retrieved 9 August 2017.
  8. ^ Ormond, Aidan (7 December 2009). "Mariner Michelle Scoops Awards". Australian FourFourTwo. Haymarket Media. Retrieved 12 August 2017.
  9. ^ "Heyman hat-trick gets United off to winning start". Canberra United FC. 8 October 2010. Retrieved 11 August 2017.
  10. ^ "Canberra Crowned W-League Champions". Australian FourFourTwo. Haymarket Media. 28 January 2012. Retrieved 12 August 2017.
  11. ^ Page, Fleta (14 September 2012). "Heyman back to chase second title with United". The Sydney Morning Herald. Fairfax Media. Retrieved 12 August 2017.
  12. ^ "Matildas striker Michelle Heyman signs with US side Western New York Flash". The Guardian. AAP. 9 July 2015. Retrieved 9 July 2015.
  13. ^ Cohen, Mitch (8 April 2016). "From Stingrays junior to national team star". Illawarra Mercury. Fairfax Regional Media. Retrieved 12 August 2017.
  14. ^ "Michelle Heyman - Player Statistics". PS4 National Premier Leagues. SportsTG. Retrieved 12 August 2017.
  15. ^ "Canberra United lose Michelle Heyman to Sydney". 21 July 2018. Retrieved 30 September 2018.
  16. ^ "Michelle Heyman signs for Adelaide United for 2018/19 season". 24 August 2018. Retrieved 30 September 2018.
  17. ^ Reilly, Ella; Lewis, Samantha (12 November 2019). "W-League 2019-20 season preview: team-by-team guide". The Guardian.
  18. ^ "Michelle Heyman is back". Canberra United. 16 November 2020.
  19. ^ Ritchie, Joel (6 August 2010). "Heyman's in demand". Illawarra Mercury. Fairfax Regional Media. Archived from the original on 11 August 2017. Retrieved 11 August 2017.
  20. ^ "AFC Women's Asian Cup 2014 - Final". The-AFC.com. The Asian Football Confederation. 25 May 2014. Retrieved 12 August 2017.
  21. ^ "FIFA Tournaments - Players & Coaches - Michelle Heyman". FIFA.com. Retrieved 12 August 2017.
  22. ^ "Women's Olympic Football Tournament, Rio 2016 - Matches". FIFA.com. Retrieved 12 August 2017.
  23. ^ "M.Heyman". Retrieved 30 September 2018.
  24. ^ "MICHELLE HEYMAN: I QUIT". thewomensgame.com. Retrieved 30 May 2019.
  25. ^ "Dolan Warren Awards: Michelle Heyman awarded Julie Dolan Medal". w-league.com.au. W-league. 23 June 2021. Retrieved 26 June 2021.
  26. ^ Heyman, Michelle; Warby, Danielle (29 February 2016). "Get out and stay out: Michelle Heyman". Zela. Special Broadcasting Service. Retrieved 11 August 2016.
  27. ^ Helmers, Caden (4 March 2017). "Michelle Heyman wins LGBTI sports personality of the year gong". The Canberra Times. Fairfax Media. Retrieved 11 August 2017.
  28. ^ Moran, Jonathan (8 April 2017). "In love and ready to rock the red carpet". Daily Telegraph. Sydney: News Corp Australia. Retrieved 11 August 2017.