Tyson vs. Frazier
DateJuly 26, 1986
VenueCivic Center in Glens Falls, New York
Title(s) on the lineNone
Tale of the tape
Boxer United States Mike Tyson United States Marvis Frazier
Nickname "Iron"
Hometown Catskill, New York Wyncote, Pennsylvania
Pre-fight record 24–0 16–1
Weight 217 lb (98 kg) 210 lb (95 kg)
Style Orthodox Orthodox
Recognition WBC
No. 2 Ranked Heavyweight
IBF
No. 4 Ranked Heavyweight
WBC
No. 9 Ranked Heavyweight

Mike Tyson vs. Marvis Frazier was a professional boxing match contested on July 26, 1986. The fight is notable for being the quickest knockout victory of Tyson's professional career, lasting only 30 seconds.

Background

The undefeated Mike Tyson had built his record up to 24–0, including 9 wins in 1986 alone. With Tyson now ranked at number two on the WBC heavyweight rankings, his next opponent became Marvis Frazier, son of former heavyweight champion Joe Frazier.[1] Frazier had been an up-and-coming prospect, but in his first high-profile fight, had been knocked out in the first round by then-WBC Heavyweight champion Larry Holmes in 1983.[2] Following his loss to Holmes, Frazier rebounded to win his next six fights, including unanimous decision victories over former contender James "Quick" Tillis and future WBA heavyweight champion James "Bonecrusher" Smith, to get back into contention. Frazier, however, came into his fight with Tyson as an overwhelming underdog, leading some to criticize his father, manager and trainer Joe for overmatching him.[3]

The fight

Tyson quickly had Frazier on the defensive, using his left jab to back Frazier into the ropes. Frazier then retreated to the corner where Tyson continued to use his left jab before unleashing two consecutive uppercuts, the second of which knocked Frazier unconscious. Tyson then landed several more blows before Frazier fell to the canvas, slumped against the ropes. Referee Joe Cortez began to count to ten, but as Frazier was clearly unresponsive, stopped the count at five and ended the fight. The fight lasted only 30 seconds, and was the quickest victory of Tyson's professional career.[4]

References

  1. ^ Son of Frazier, N.Y. Times article, 1986-06-20, Retrieved on 2013-09-11
  2. ^ Holmes Stops Frazier in First, N.Y. Times article, 1983-11-26, Retrieved on 2013-09-11
  3. ^ For Marvis Frazier, Does Father Know Best?, N.Y. Times article, 1986-07-21, Retrieved on 2013-09-11
  4. ^ Tyson Says Hello, Goodbye to Frazier in Round 1, L.A. Times article, 1986-07-27, Retrieved on 2013-09-11