Millennial Woes
Robertson in 2018
Personal information
BornColin Robertson[1]
NationalityScottish
OccupationSocial media personality
Websitemillennialwoes.com
YouTube information
Years active2013[2]-present

Colin Robertson, known as Millennial Woes or simply Woes,[3][4] is a Scottish former YouTuber, white supremacist, and antisemitic conspiracy theorist.[5][6][7]

According to anti-racism and anti-fascism research group Hope Not Hate, Robertson is known for supporting slavery, and has called for the bombing of refugees crossing the Mediterranean.[8]

Robertson stepped away from political activism after various accusations of sexual harassment and assault were levelled against him.[9] Other leaders in the far-right movement, such as Mark Collett and Jason Köhne, have stated that compelling evidence corroborates the allegations.[9] In response to the controversy, Robertson released a statement stating that "A few of [the allegations] are true, [but] many are not", apologized for "letting people down," and stated that he intended to "take some time away to actively work on my personal failings."

Career

Robertson attended an art college in London in the mid-2000s. He launched his YouTube channel at the end of 2013.[10]

In January 2017, Robertson began receiving coverage from BBC News[11] and national newspapers,[12] after Scottish tabloid the Daily Record claimed to have doxxed Millennial Woes, "expos[ing]" his birth name, family's home address and sending reporters and photographers to his parent's home to try to find him.[13] Robertson was reported to have "left Britain", posting a video to his YouTube channel named "Fugitive Woes".[14] BNP-affiliated group Civil Liberty publicly defended him, claiming his outing by media was a "hate campaign fomented by Daily Mirror".[15]

In August 2017, Salon claimed that Millennial Woes was one of only a few alt-right platforms to rapidly grow, alongside Red Ice, VDARE and The Rebel Media.[16][17]

On 10 December 2017, he began an interview series named Millenniyule 2017, inviting various internet personalities from the alt-right movement,[18] including an appearance from Faith Goldy.[19]

Speeches

Robertson delivered a speech at the National Policy Institute Conference in November 2016, in Washington DC. On 4 February 2017, Robertson gave a speech entitled "Withnail and I as Viewed From the Right" at The London Forum in Kensington,[20] which The Independent described as "a meeting of prominent far-right voices".[21] On 25 February 2017, Robertson gave a speech in Stockholm organised by Motpol, which had been promoted as "the most important alt-right conference in Europe". According to IBTimes, the event took place in a "secret location" in Södermalm.[22] On 1 July 2017, he appeared at the Scandza Forum in Oslo, a far-right conference[23] known for promoting racism and antisemitism.[24] Searchlight covered his appearance, reporting the title of the conference as "Globalism v the Ethnostate" and Robertson as a "scheduled speaker".[13]

Accusations

In May 2020, Robertson stepped away from political activism after various accusations of sexual harassment and assault were levelled against him by far-right communities online.[25] Other leaders in the far-right movement, such as Mark Collett and Jason Köhne, have stated that compelling evidence corroborates the allegations.[9]

Views

Robertson is a proponent of the white genocide conspiracy theory.[4] He has claimed in interviews that "there are problems with the Jewish people".[5]

References

  1. ^ "Fallout from modern protests: naming and shaming online". The Christian Science Monitor. 17 August 2017.
  2. ^ "Are these the faces of London's young 'alt-right'?". The Standard. 2 March 2017.
  3. ^ "I Love Hans Hoppe!". LewRockwell.com. 23 October 2017.
  4. ^ a b "Exposed racist vlogger flees home and faces police probe". Sunday Herald. 15 January 2017.
  5. ^ a b "WATCH: 'Alt-Right' Owns up to Anti-Semitism". The Forward. 16 December 2016.
  6. ^ "Warwick student's leading role in Facebook hate group exposed". The Boar. 27 November 2017.
  7. ^ Townsend, Mark (August 24, 2019). "Far-right activist posted to serve on Trident submarine". The Guardian. Retrieved 23 September 2019.
  8. ^ "PATRIOTIC ALTERNATIVE: UNITING THE FASCIST RIGHT?" (PDF). Hopenothate.org.uk. Retrieved 3 November 2021.
  9. ^ a b c "White Nationalist YouTuber Goes Dark After Allegations of Sexual Misconduct". 5 May 2020.
  10. ^ "Government suspends its YouTube advertising, amid concerns about where revenue goes". The Sydney Morning Herald. 1 April 2017.
  11. ^ "Scotland's papers: Crime figures 'fiddle' and Brexit warning". BBC News. 9 January 2017.
  12. ^ "Racist vlogger who became global YouTube sensation unmasked as jobless ex-student who lives with dad". Daily Mirror. 9 January 2017.
  13. ^ a b "International Nazi movement meets again in Norway". Searchlight. 4 July 2017.
  14. ^ "Vile YouTube racist flees to US and puts out the begging bowl after Record exposes him". Daily Record (Scotland). 11 January 2017.
  15. ^ "You Tube vlogger faces hate campaign fomented by Daily Mirror". Civil Liberty (UK). 16 January 2017.
  16. ^ "Trump and the Nazis: Our troll-in-chief has a deep affinity with the alt-right — and with their ancestors". Salon. 20 August 2017.
  17. ^ As it was then known.
  18. ^ "'Sargon Of Akkad' Cites White Nationalist Propaganda, Reveals His Alt-Right Sympathies". Right Wing Watch. 11 January 2017.
  19. ^ "Faith Goldy Recites The '14 Words'". Right Wing Watch. 20 December 2017.
  20. ^ Poulter, James (12 March 2018). "The Neo-Nazi Home of the UK Alt-Right". Vice.
  21. ^ "Activists blockade London meeting of 'secret Neo Nazi society'". The Independent. 6 February 2017.
  22. ^ "Inside the alt-right: Stockholm conference brings together US and European white nationalists". International Business Times. 3 March 2017.
  23. ^ "US white supremacist arrested hours before far-right conference in Norway". The Independent. 2019-11-03. Retrieved 2019-12-12.
  24. ^ Cotovio, Vasco. "Norway arrests US white supremacist ahead of far-right conference". CNN. Retrieved 2019-12-12.
  25. ^ Holt, Jared Holt (2020-05-05). "White Nationalist YouTuber Goes Dark After Allegations of Sexual Misconduct". Right Wing Watch. Retrieved 2021-05-14.