Action Paddling The Moosup River
Action Paddling The Moosup River

The Moosup River is a river in the U.S. states of Rhode Island and Connecticut. It flows approximately 23.7 miles (38.1 km).[1] The river is named after the Native American sachem Maussup.[2]

View north of the Moosup River's Brunswick Dam and the North Main Street (CT Route 14) bridge from the Moosup Valley State Park Trail in Plainfield, Connecticut.
View north of the Moosup River's Brunswick Dam and the North Main Street (CT Route 14) bridge from the Moosup Valley State Park Trail in Plainfield, Connecticut.

Course

The river rises from Clark Pond in Foster, Rhode Island. From there, it flows south through Foster and Coventry, then turns west and heads into Connecticut, flowing through Sterling and Plainfield to its mouth at the Quinebaug River.

Dam Removal

The American Rivers organization has targeted the Moosup River for dam removal to help fish to swim upstream to spawn. In late June 2014 Moosup Dam #1 in Connecticut was removed [3] and on September 29, 2015, the Griswold Rubber dam in Connecticut was removed.[4]

Crossings

Below is a list all crossings over the Moosup River. The list starts at the headwaters and goes downstream.

State County Town Carrying
RI Providence Foster Harrington Road
Moosup Valley Road
Kent Coventry Barbs Hill Road
Rhode Island 14.svg
RI 14
CT Windham Sterling Deerfield Drive
Connecticut Highway 14A.svg
CT 14A
Connecticut Highway 14.svg
CT 14
Plainfield
Connecticut Highway 14.svg
CT 14
Barber Hill Road
River Street
Pond Street
South Main Street
I-395 (CT).svg
I-395
Connecticut Highway 12.svg
CT 12
Water Street
Black Hill Road

Tributaries

In addition to many unnamed tributaries, the following brooks feed the Moosup:

See also

References

  1. ^ U.S. Geological Survey. National Hydrography Dataset high-resolution flowline data. The National Map, accessed April 1, 2011
  2. ^ Gannett, Henry (1902). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States (PDF). Bulletin of the United States Geological Survey. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office. p. 184. Retrieved June 8, 2021.
  3. ^ American Rivers Blog "11 Dam Removal Projects to Watch This Summer." "11 Projects to Watch: Dam Removal Construction Season Kicks off | American Rivers". Archived from the original on 2015-11-27. Retrieved 2015-11-26., accessed November 26, 2015
  4. ^ American Rivers Facebook post on September 29, 2015 with three photos." [1], accessed November 26, 2015

Coordinates: 41°45′58″N 71°46′17″W / 41.765989°N 71.771322°W / 41.765989; -71.771322