NBC Montana
TypeBroadcast television network
BrandingNBC Montana
MeTV Montana (DT2)
Country
AvailabilityRegional
Founded1954
HeadquartersMissoula, Montana
Broadcast area
Western Montana
OwnerSinclair Broadcast Group
Launch date
July 1, 1954 (67 years ago) (1954-07-01)
(see article)
Picture format
1080i (HDTV)
480i (SDTV)
Affiliation(s)x.1: NBC
x.2: MeTV
x.3: Charge!
AffiliatesSee list
Primary:
CBS (1954–1965)
Secondary:
ABC (1954–1976, 1984–1990)
DuMont (1954–1956)
CBS (1965–1966, 1976–1984)
PBS (per program, 1976–1984)
DT3:
This TV (until 2013)
Movies! (2013–20??)
Official website
www.nbcmontana.com
Map all coordinates using: OpenStreetMap  Download coordinates as: KML

NBC Montana is a regional network of three television stations in western Montana, all affiliated with NBC.

The flagship station is KECI-TV in Missoula, broadcasting on virtual and VHF digital channel 13. It includes two semi-satellites: KCFW-TV (channel 9) in Kalispell and KTVM-TV (channel 6) in Butte. It also serves Bozeman via Class A translator KDBZ-CD (channel 29), which directly repeats KTVM. All stations are owned and operated by the Sinclair Broadcast Group.

The stations air the same programming most of the time, but KCFW and KTVM air their own commercials and legal identifications, as well as partially separate local newscasts.

The combined signal of the three full-power stations and numerous low-power transmitters provides at least Grade B coverage of approximately 45 percent of the state. The stations reach an estimated 200,000 households. The coverage area stretches from Salmon, Idaho, through Helena to Bozeman in the east. It also includes parts of southern Alberta, Canada near the U.S.–Canada border.

KECI's studios, which house master control and internal operations for all three stations, are located on West Main Street in downtown Missoula. KCFW is based on 1st Avenue in downtown Kalispell, while KTVM is based on Dewey Avenue in Butte.

History

On March 11, 1953, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) granted Mosby's, Incorporated, owner of KGVO (1290 AM), a construction permit for a new television station on channel 13 in Missoula.[1] Construction began in November 1953 on the road to the mountaintop facility, the first of its kind in the state and at the highest elevation of any television transmitter of the period in the northwestern United States; while two stations had gone on the air in Butte and a third in Billings, neither was located atop a mountain.[2]

KGVO-TV began telecasting July 1, 1954.[1] Originally, the station was a primary CBS affiliate, owing to its radio sister's long affiliation with CBS radio, but also carried programming from ABC and DuMont;[3] it would lose DuMont when the network shut down in 1956. While the studios were originally at the transmitter site, owner Arthur Mosby purchased an American Legion hall in downtown Missoula that had been gutted by fire and renovated it to serve as new studios.[4] On December 1, 1956, the station's studios moved from its transmitter location to its radio sister's studios on West Main Street in downtown Missoula and concurrently changed its call letters to KMSO-TV, representing Missoula's airport code.[5] By 1957, KMSO had added a secondary affiliation with NBC.[6] Mosby sold KGVO radio to Dale Moore in 1959[7] but held on to KMSO-TV until 1964, when Moore bought channel 13 as well;[8] upon taking over, he changed its call letters back to KGVO-TV.[1]

Under Moore's ownership, KGVO-TV switched its primary affiliation to NBC in 1965, though it still carried some CBS and ABC programming.[9] The transmitter was destroyed by fire in November 1966;[10] the FCC permitted the installation of two interim translators to get the station back on air until the TV Mountain facility could be reconstructed.[1]

Additionally, the station pursued a policy of regional expansion. It built a translator on channel 9 in Kalispell—which had been without a local broadcast service for six years since the folding of KGEZ-TV/KULR in 1959—that was the first authorized for 100 watts on the VHF band.[9] That December, the FCC simultaneously approved a channel 6 translator for KGVO-TV in Butte and a translator for Butte's local station, CBS affiliate KXLF-TV, in Missoula.[11] Both of these services were replaced with high-power, full-service repeaters of KGVO-TV. KCFW-TV began broadcasting on June 10, 1968,[12][13] while the Butte translator was replaced with KTVM in May 1970. In 1976, primary coverage of ABC programs shifted from KECI to KXLF and its Missoula satellite, KPAX-TV.[14]

Dale Moore's Western Broadcasting Company reached a deal to sell KECI, KCFW, and KTVM to Eagle Communications, Inc.—a company formed by former The Ed Sullivan Show producer Robert Precht and Advance Communications, owner of KFBB-TV in Great Falls—in 1977.[15] Despite a protest from a citizens' group, Montanans for Quality Television, the deal received FCC approval in September 1978,[16] and on November 1, KGVO-TV became KECI-TV. The new owners pledged to improve news coverage, in part under a pact with the citizens' group,[17] The Eagle stations also aired Sesame Street for three years from 1978 to 1981, dropping the program due to a lack of underwriters.[18]

Eagle demonstrated an increased commitment to the Butte area, which from the launch of KTVM in 1970 was not being served by any specific local programming. After expressing interest in establishing a Butte office in 1978,[19] the station did so in 1982 and began producing local news reports for inclusion in KECI's newscasts.[20] Precht Communications, a sister company to Sullivan Productions, acquired full control of Eagle Communications by 1981.[21]

In 1984, KXLF and the other Montana Television Network stations became full-time CBS outlets. As a result, most ABC programs moved to the Eagle network.[22] Between 1984 and 1989, KECI aired an 11 p.m. late local newscast—highly unusual in the Mountain Time Zone—which gave it more time to air ABC programs but created further scheduling headaches and put its late news at a disadvantage.[23] Viewers cited confusion over the availability of programs, and returning the late news to 10 p.m. allowed Eagle to restore The Tonight Show and Saturday Night Live to its lineup en route to becoming a sole NBC affiliate.[24] A full-time ABC outlet, KTMF (channel 23), was established in 1990.

The 1980s also saw Eagle seek to increase its presence in Bozeman. It first attempted to buy the construction permit for KCTZ, a channel 7 station that had sought an ABC affiliation only to have its hopes dashed by Eagle's June 1984 acquisition of the ABC rights in the Missoula–Butte market.[25][26] The opposition of two local residents and radio station owners caused the deal to languish for 16 months at the FCC until the green light was given in January 1986,[27] and the deal fell apart. In 1989, Eagle purchased the construction permit for low-power K42BZ, which took to the air in 1993 as a separate station.[28]

In 1997, Precht sold the Eagle system to Lamco Communications,[29] which in turn sold its stations to Bluestone Television in 2004.[30] Bonten Media Group acquired the BlueStone stations in 2007.[31] Under Bonten, K42BZ was upgraded to Class A status as KDBZ-CD.

On April 21, 2017, Sinclair Broadcast Group announced its intent to purchase the Bonten stations for $240 million.[32] The sale was completed September 1.[33]

News operations

Historically, the stations aired a mix of local and regional news programming. From the outset in 1968, KCFW produced its own early evening newscast; it was not until the mid-1980s that one was established at KTVM in Butte. By 1993, the three Eagle network stations aired regional newscasts from Missoula at 5 and 10 p.m. and local news programs for their specific areas at 6 p.m. That year, the company underwent a major restructuring of its news operations, untangling the stations from each other to produce local 6 and 10 p.m. programs, and it announced the addition of a fourth local news service for Bozeman.[34] The weekend newscasts for Bozeman were that city's first; the only other news operation in the city, at KCTZ, aired five days a week.[28]

The Bozeman newscast debuted October 4, 1993. Just 25 days later, citing costs, Eagle opted to shutter the Butte operation and originate news for both areas from Bozeman, firing the 15 news and production staffers it had in the Mining City.[35] At the same time, KECI anchor Jill Valley defected to crosstown competitor KPAX, causing the station to plunge in the ratings—especially in Missoula itself.[36]

Notable former on-air staff

Stations

Main stations

Station City of license Channels
(VC / RF)
First air date Call letters’
meaning
ERP HAAT Transmitter coordinates Facility ID Public license information
KECI-TV1 Missoula 13
13 (VHF)
July 1, 1954 (67 years ago) (1954-07-01) Former owner Eagle Communications, Incorporated 41.3 kW 610 m (2,001 ft) 47°1′4″N 114°0′50″W / 47.01778°N 114.01389°W / 47.01778; -114.01389 (KECI-TV) 18084 Profile
LMS
KCFW-TV Kalispell 9
9 (VHF)
June 10, 1968 (53 years ago) (1968-06-10) Kalispell, Columbia Falls and Whitefish, the three largest towns in its broadcast area 2.5 kW
17 kW (CP)
850 m (2,789 ft)
67 m (220 ft) (CP)
48°0′48″N 114°21′58″W / 48.01333°N 114.36611°W / 48.01333; -114.36611 (KCFW-TV) 18079 Profile
LMS
KTVM-TV2 Butte 6
6 (VHF)
May 12, 1970 (51 years ago) (1970-05-12) "Television Montana" 19.2 kW 591.3 m (1,940 ft) 46°0′27″N 112°26′33″W / 46.00750°N 112.44250°W / 46.00750; -112.44250 (KTVM-TV) 18066 Profile
LMS
KDBZ-CD3 Bozeman 6
29 (UHF)
1992 (30 years ago) (1992) From former K42BZ translator call sign 15 kW 235 m (771 ft)
206.7 m (678 ft) (CP)
45°40′24″N 110°52′5″W / 45.67333°N 110.86806°W / 45.67333; -110.86806 (KDBZ-CD) 18083 Profile
LMS

Notes:

Translators

City of license Callsign Translating Channel ERP HAAT Facility ID Transmitter coordinates Owner
Basin K11LA-D KTVM 11 0.015 kW −316 m (−1,037 ft) 4044 46°16′31.2″N 112°16′8.9″W / 46.275333°N 112.269139°W / 46.275333; -112.269139 (K11LA-D) Basin TV Association
Boulder K13KP-D 13 0.019 kW −149 m (−489 ft) 6522 46°15′20.7″N 112°8′56″W / 46.255750°N 112.14889°W / 46.255750; -112.14889 (K13KP-D)
Dillon K25OA-D 25 0.159 kW 145 m (476 ft) 18086 45°14′20.8″N 112°40′8.1″W / 45.239111°N 112.668917°W / 45.239111; -112.668917 (K25OA-D) Sinclair Broadcast Group
Drummond K26KA-D KECI 26 0.167 kW −137 m (−449 ft) 183078 46°37′2.2″N 113°10′55.5″W / 46.617278°N 113.182083°W / 46.617278; -113.182083 (K26KA-D) Granite County TV District
Eureka K02AO-D KCFW 2 0.018 kW 188 m (617 ft) 18071 48°51′52.8″N 115°7′30.6″W / 48.864667°N 115.125167°W / 48.864667; -115.125167 (K02AO-D) Sinclair Broadcast Group
Ferndale K24ID-D 24 0.108 kW 85 m (279 ft) 64282 48°4′4.3″N 114°2′19.3″W / 48.067861°N 114.038694°W / 48.067861; -114.038694 (K24ID-D) Swan Hill TV District
Frenchtown K14IU-D KECI 14 0.351 kW 461 m (1,512 ft) 18067 46°51′11.7″N 113°55′44.3″W / 46.853250°N 113.928972°W / 46.853250; -113.928972 (K14IU-D) Sinclair Broadcast Group
Hot Springs K05AH-D 5 0.005 kW 9 m (30 ft) 27685 47°37′56.7″N 114°39′51″W / 47.632417°N 114.66417°W / 47.632417; -114.66417 (K05AH-D) Hot Springs TV District
Lake McDonald K05FC-D KCFW 628 m (2,060 ft) 16754 48°25′59.1″N 113°57′58.4″W / 48.433083°N 113.966222°W / 48.433083; -113.966222 (K05FC-D) Sinclair Broadcast Group
Libby K18KD-D 18 0.431 kW 84 m (276 ft) 37220 48°26′19.8″N 115°31′40.5″W / 48.438833°N 115.527917°W / 48.438833; -115.527917 (K18KD-D) Libby Video Club, Inc.
Philipsburg K25LF-D KECI 25 0.015 kW 475 m (1,558 ft) 183064 46°15′48.8″N 113°15′2.9″W / 46.263556°N 113.250806°W / 46.263556; -113.250806 (K25LF-D) Granite County TV District
Plains
Paradise
K11JP-D 11 0.042 kW 36 m (118 ft) 52778 47°31′14.7″N 114°57′31.4″W / 47.520750°N 114.958722°W / 47.520750; -114.958722 (K11JP-D) Plains-Paradise TV District
Polaris K09MY-D KTVM 9 0.026 kW −3 m (−10 ft) 24904 45°25′59.7″N 113°9′3.1″W / 45.433250°N 113.150861°W / 45.433250; -113.150861 (K09MY-D) Grasshopper TV Association
Polson K16GJ-D KECI 16 0.061 kW 11 m (36 ft) 52912 47°40′38.8″N 114°8′33.2″W / 47.677444°N 114.142556°W / 47.677444; -114.142556 (K16GJ-D) Blacktail TV Tax District
Sula K05ML-D 5 0.006 kW 114 m (374 ft) 181578 45°49′17.5″N 113°59′41″W / 45.821528°N 113.99472°W / 45.821528; -113.99472 (K05ML-D) Sula TV District
Superior K03DT-D 3 0.005 kW −99 m (−325 ft) 64031 47°10′30″N 114°55′3.7″W / 47.17500°N 114.917694°W / 47.17500; -114.917694 (K03DT-D) Superior TV Translator District
Thompson Falls K11FQ-D 11 0.033 kW 309 m (1,014 ft) 66962 47°32′27″N 115°19′5″W / 47.54083°N 115.31806°W / 47.54083; -115.31806 (K11FQ-D) Thompson Falls TV District
K25OS-D 25 0.053 kW −270 m (−886 ft) 181907 47°35′45″N 115°16′51″W / 47.59583°N 115.28083°W / 47.59583; -115.28083 (K25OS-D)
Trout Creek K12QT-D KECI 12 0.019 kW 239 m (784 ft) 181548 47°57′17.9″N 115°40′14.9″W / 47.954972°N 115.670806°W / 47.954972; -115.670806 (K12QT-D) Trout Creek-Heron-Noxon TV District
Virginia City K10HL-D KTVM 10 0.012 kW 154 m (505 ft) 18075 45°16′29.7″N 111°57′17.9″W / 45.274917°N 111.954972°W / 45.274917; -111.954972 (K10HL-D) Sinclair Broadcast Group
Weeksville K29ID-D KCFW 29 0.914 kW 884 m (2,900 ft) 52775 47°22′19.7″N 114°51′32.4″W / 47.372139°N 114.859000°W / 47.372139; -114.859000 (K29ID-D) Paradise-Plains TV District
Leadore, ID K16KO-D KECI 16 0.154 kW −245 m (−804 ft) 186646 44°40′1.7″N 113°21′3.1″W / 44.667139°N 113.350861°W / 44.667139; -113.350861 (K16KO-D) Salmon TV Translator District
Salmon, ID K11TY-D 11 0.018 kW −294 m (−965 ft) 58704 45°4′4.7″N 113°52′33.2″W / 45.067972°N 113.875889°W / 45.067972; -113.875889 (K11TY-D)
K30PW-D 30 0.11 kW 846 m (2,776 ft) 58698 45°8′44.7″N 114°0′33.2″W / 45.145750°N 114.009222°W / 45.145750; -114.009222 (K30PW-D)
Tendoy, ID
Leadore, ID
K27MM-D 27 0.386 kW 531 m (1,742 ft) 58709 44°55′29.7″N 113°34′43.1″W / 44.924917°N 113.578639°W / 44.924917; -113.578639 (K27MM-D)

Digital television

Digital channels

The stations' digital signals are multiplexed:

Subchannels[39][40][41]
Channel Video Short name Programming
KECI-TV KCFW-TV
  • KTVM-TV
  • KDBZ-CD
KECI-TV KCFW-TV
  • KTVM-TV
  • KDBZ-CD
13.1 9.1 6.1 1080i KECI-DT KCFW-DT KTVM-DT NBC
13.2 9.2 6.2 480i MeTV-SD MeTV
13.3 9.3 6.3 CHARGE! Charge!

Analog-to-digital conversion

All stations shut down their analog signals on June 12, 2009, the official date in which full-power television stations in the United States transitioned from analog to digital broadcasts under federal mandate. The station's digital channel allocations post-transition are as follows:[42][43]

References

  1. ^ a b c d FCC History Cards for KECI
  2. ^ "Work Is Started On Road to Television Site". The Daily Missoulian. November 3, 1953. p. 1.
  3. ^ 1955–56 Telecasting Yearbook-Marketbook (PDF). 1955. p. 170. Retrieved October 4, 2015.
  4. ^ "Legion Post Sells Building". The Daily Missoulian. July 17, 1956. p. 12.
  5. ^ "KGVO-TV Changed to KMSO-TV; Station Moves Into New Studios" (PDF). Broadcasting-Telecasting. December 3, 1956. p. 94. Archived (PDF) from the original on September 27, 2015. Retrieved October 4, 2015.
  6. ^ 1957–58 Telecasting Yearbook-Marketbook (PDF). 1957. p. 164. Retrieved October 4, 2015.
  7. ^ "Changing hands" (PDF). Broadcasting. September 28, 1959. p. 98. Archived (PDF) from the original on September 27, 2015. Retrieved October 4, 2015.
  8. ^ "Sale of KMSO-TV approved by commission" (PDF). Broadcasting. September 14, 1964. p. 10. Archived (PDF) from the original on September 27, 2015. Retrieved October 4, 2015.
  9. ^ a b "First high power VHF TV translator is state station". The Montana Standard-Post. October 9, 1965. p. 11. Archived from the original on December 14, 2021. Retrieved November 1, 2021.
  10. ^ "KGVO-TV Returns To Direct Broadcast". The Daily Missoulian. November 26, 1966. p. 7.
  11. ^ "New television translator at Butte okayed". Montana Standard-Post. December 3, 1965. p. 8. Archived from the original on October 30, 2021. Retrieved October 30, 2021.
  12. ^ Eggert, Richard (June 4, 1968). "KCFW Preparing to Roll". The Missoulian. p. 10. Archived from the original on December 14, 2021. Retrieved November 1, 2021.
  13. ^ "Television Station Goes On Air". The Daily Inter Lake. June 11, 1968. p. 2.
  14. ^ "KPAX, KXLF Are ABC Affiliates". The Missoulian. June 19, 1976. p. 2-A. Archived from the original on November 1, 2021. Retrieved November 1, 2021.
  15. ^ "Western Broadcasting Sells Three TV Stations". The Missoulian. October 20, 1977. p. 16. Archived from the original on December 14, 2021. Retrieved November 1, 2021.
  16. ^ "Missoula TV fetches bundle". The Missoulian. September 17, 1978. p. 24.
  17. ^ Shirley, Steve (November 2, 1978). "New TV station owner vows to improve programs". The Missoulian. p. 14. Archived from the original on December 14, 2021. Retrieved November 1, 2021.
  18. ^ "Local station cancels 'Sesame Street' show". The Missoulian. December 3, 1981. p. 9.
  19. ^ "KTVM pledges more coverage". The Montana Standard. November 11, 1978. p. Time Out 3. Archived from the original on December 14, 2021. Retrieved November 1, 2021.
  20. ^ "Eagle TV lands in Butte". The Montana Standard. August 14, 1982. p. Time Out 4.
  21. ^ Broadcasting/Cablecasting Yearbook 1982 (PDF). 1982. p. A-38. Retrieved October 4, 2015.
  22. ^ Broadcasting/Cablecasting Yearbook 1985 (PDF). 1985. p. C-36. Retrieved October 4, 2015.
  23. ^ McInally, Mike (August 4, 1989). "KECI plans to shuffle time for late news". The Missoulian. p. E-21. Archived from the original on December 14, 2021. Retrieved November 25, 2020.
  24. ^ Ragsdale, Anne (September 25, 1989). "Eagle changes TV lineup". The Missoulian. p. A-5. Archived from the original on December 14, 2021. Retrieved November 1, 2021.
  25. ^ Nell, William (June 15, 1984). "ABC deal could delay TV station in Bozeman". The Billings Gazette. p. 3A, 14A. Archived from the original on November 2, 2021. Retrieved November 2, 2021.
  26. ^ "Network buys station permit in Bozeman". Great Falls Tribune. Associated Press. September 13, 1984. p. 7-C. Archived from the original on November 2, 2021. Retrieved November 2, 2021.
  27. ^ "FCC OKs extension to build Bozeman TV station". The Missoulian. Associated Press. p. 15. Archived from the original on November 2, 2021. Retrieved November 2, 2021.
  28. ^ a b "Second local station signs on in Bozeman". The Missoulian. Associated Press. August 22, 1993. p. F-2. Archived from the original on November 2, 2021. Retrieved November 2, 2021.
  29. ^ Ludwick, Jim (December 30, 1997). "Area TV stations to be sold". The Missoulian. p. B2. Archived from the original on November 2, 2021. Retrieved November 2, 2021.
  30. ^ Holien, Mick (January 15, 2004). "Missoula's KECI among 12 stations sold in Lamco acquisition". The Missoulian. Archived from the original on October 26, 2018. Retrieved October 4, 2015.
  31. ^ "Bonten Closes on $230M BlueStone Buy". TVNewsCheck. June 5, 2007. Archived from the original on September 26, 2018. Retrieved October 4, 2015.
  32. ^ "Sinclair Buying Bonten Stations For $240M". TVNewsCheck. Archived from the original on August 9, 2018. Retrieved April 21, 2017.
  33. ^ "Consummation Notice". Federal Communications Commission. Archived from the original on September 6, 2017. Retrieved September 6, 2017.
  34. ^ "KTVM will add 10 p.m. newscast". The Montana Standard. March 13, 1993. p. Time Out 9. Archived from the original on November 2, 2021. Retrieved November 2, 2021.
  35. ^ Kirkpatrick, Dave (October 30, 1993). "KTVM-TV office closes; staff fired". The Montana Standard. pp. 1, 10. Archived from the original on November 2, 2021. Retrieved November 2, 2021.
  36. ^ McInally, Mike (January 5, 1994). "KPAX ratings surge past KECI". The Missoulian. p. D-2. Archived from the original on December 14, 2021. Retrieved November 2, 2021.
  37. ^ Haisten, Bill (April 26, 2011). "Tulsa native Dari Nowkhah rises from KOTV to ESPN". Tulsa World. Archived from the original on November 2, 2021. Retrieved November 2, 2021.
  38. ^ "Oliver Named to Anchor Position on CBS's 'Up to the Minute'". TVWeek. March 20, 2006. Archived from the original on November 2, 2021. Retrieved November 2, 2021.
  39. ^ "RabbitEars TV Query for KECI". Archived from the original on March 3, 2016. Retrieved June 24, 2014.
  40. ^ "RabbitEars TV Query for KCFW". Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved June 24, 2014.
  41. ^ "RabbitEars TV Query for KTVM". Archived from the original on March 3, 2016. Retrieved June 24, 2014.
  42. ^ "DTV Tentative Channel Designations for the First and the Second Rounds" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on August 29, 2013. Retrieved March 24, 2012.
  43. ^ "FCC-07-90A1" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on October 19, 2011. Retrieved May 26, 2008.